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We interviewed Linux OS through an AI bot to discover its secrets

#artificialintelligence

Millions of people use Linux every day, but we rarely stop to think about how the operating system feels about it. Wouldn't it be nice to know what Linux really thinks about open source, Windows, Macs, and the command line? Until now, this has impossible. But thanks to a new AI chat tool, we're able to find out. Two weeks ago, a website called Character.AI opened a public beta that allows visitors to create a chat bot based on any character they can imagine.


Darth Vader's voice will be AI-generated from now on

#artificialintelligence

During the creation of the Obi-Wan Kenobi TV series, James Earl Jones signed off on allowing Disney to replicate his vocal performance as Darth Vader in future projects using an AI voice-modeling tool called Respeecher, according to a Vanity Fair report published Friday. Jones, who is 91, has voiced the iconic Star Wars villain for 45 years, starting with Star Wars: Episode IV--A New Hope in 1977 and concluding with a brief line of dialog in 2019's The Rise of Skywalker. "He had mentioned he was looking into winding down this particular character," said Matthew Wood, a supervising sound editor at Lucasfilm, during an interview with Vanity Fair. "So how do we move forward?" The answer was Respeecher, a voice cloning product from a company in Ukraine that uses deep learning to model and replicate human voices in a way that is nearly indistinguishable from the real thing.


AIhub monthly digest: September 2022 – environmental conservation, retrosynthesis, and RoboCup

AIHub

Welcome to our September 2022 monthly digest, where you can catch up with any AIhub stories you may have missed, get the low-down on recent events, and much more. This month, amongst other things, we find out more about environmental conservation, synthesizing new medicines, the efficiency of large language models, and the RoboCup Humanoid League. A key part of this work focusses on how to strategically allocate limited resources. Her primary application area is poaching prevention, helping rangers in protected areas around the world plan patrols and identify poaching hotspots. In this blog post, Christopher Franz and Kevin Schewior write about how they applied a well-known algorithm for solving two-player games to the problem of synthesizing new molecules.


Why AI will never rule the world

#artificialintelligence

Call it the Skynet hypothesis, Artificial General Intelligence, or the advent of the Singularity -- for years, AI experts and non-experts alike have fretted (and, for a small group, celebrated) the idea that artificial intelligence may one day become smarter than humans. According to the theory, advances in AI -- specifically of the machine learning type that's able to take on new information and rewrite its code accordingly -- will eventually catch up with the wetware of the biological brain. In this interpretation of events, every AI advance from Jeopardy-winning IBM machines to the massive AI language model GPT-3 is taking humanity one step closer to an existential threat. Except that it will never happen. Co-authors University at Buffalo philosophy professor Barry Smith and Jobst Landgrebe, founder of German AI company Cognotekt argue that human intelligence won't be overtaken by "an immortal dictator" any time soon -- or ever.


Meta's AI guru LeCun: Most of today's AI approaches will never lead to true intelligence

#artificialintelligence

"I think AI systems need to be able to reason," says Yann LeCun, Meta's chief AI scientist. Today's popular AI approaches such as Transformers, many of which build upon his own pioneering work in the field, will not be sufficient. "You have to take a step back and say, Okay, we built this ladder, but we want to go to the moon, and there's no way this ladder is going to get us there," says LeCun. Yann LeCun, chief AI scientist of Meta Properties, owner of Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp, is likely to tick off a lot of people in his field. With the posting in June of a think piece on the Open Review server, LeCun offered a broad overview of an approach he thinks holds promise for achieving human-level intelligence in machines. Implied if not articulated in the paper is the contention that most of today's big projects in AI will never be able to reach that human-level goal. In a discussion this month with ZDNet via Zoom, LeCun made clear that he views with great skepticism many of the most successful avenues of research in deep learning at the moment. "I think they're necessary but not sufficient," the Turing Award winner told ZDNet of his peers' pursuits. Those include large language models such as the Transformer-based GPT-3 and their ilk. As LeCun characterizes it, the Transformer devotées believe, "We tokenize everything, and train giganticmodels to make discrete predictions, and somehow AI will emerge out of this." "They're not wrong," he says, "in the sense that that may be a component of a future intelligent system, but I think it's missing essential pieces." It's a startling critique of what appears to work coming from the scholar who perfected the use of convolutional neural networks, a practical technique that has been incredibly productive in deep learning programs. LeCun sees flaws and limitations in plenty of other highly successful areas of the discipline. Reinforcement learning will also never be enough, he maintains. Researchers such as David Silver of DeepMind, who developed the AlphaZero program that mastered Chess, Shogi and Go, are focusing on programs that are "very action-based," observes LeCun, but "most of the learning we do, we don't do it by actually taking actions, we do it by observing." Lecun, 62, from a perspective of decades of achievement, nevertheless expresses an urgency to confront what he thinks are the blind alleys toward which many may be rushing, and to try to coax his field in the direction he thinks things should go. "We see a lot of claims as to what should we do to push forward towards human-level AI," he says.


Meta's AI guru LeCun: Most of today's AI approaches will never lead to true intelligence

ZDNet

"I think AI systems need to be able to reason," says Yann LeCun, Meta's chief AI scientist. Today's popular AI approaches such as Transformers, many of which build upon his own pioneering work in the field, will not be sufficient. "You have to take a step back and say, Okay, we built this ladder, but we want to go to the moon, and there's no way this ladder is going to get us there," says LeCun. Yann LeCun, chief AI scientist of Meta Properties, owner of Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp, is likely to tick off a lot of people in his field. With the posting in June of a think piece on the Open Review server, LeCun offered a broad overview of an approach he thinks holds promise for achieving human-level intelligence in machines. Implied if not articulated in the paper is the contention that most of today's big projects in AI will never be able to reach that human-level goal. In a discussion this month with ZDNet via Zoom, LeCun made clear that he views with great skepticism many of the most successful avenues of research in deep learning at the moment. "I think they're necessary but not sufficient," the Turing Award winner told ZDNet of his peers' pursuits. Those include large language models such as the Transformer-based GPT-3 and their ilk. As LeCun characterizes it, the Transformer devotées believe, "We tokenize everything, and train giganticmodels to make discrete predictions, and somehow AI will emerge out of this." "They're not wrong," he says, "in the sense that that may be a component of a future intelligent system, but I think it's missing essential pieces." It's a startling critique of what appears to work coming from the scholar who perfected the use of convolutional neural networks, a practical technique that has been incredibly productive in deep learning programs. LeCun sees flaws and limitations in plenty of other highly successful areas of the discipline. Reinforcement learning will also never be enough, he maintains. Researchers such as David Silver of DeepMind, who developed the AlphaZero program that mastered Chess, Shogi and Go, are focusing on programs that are "very action-based," observes LeCun, but "most of the learning we do, we don't do it by actually taking actions, we do it by observing." Lecun, 62, from a perspective of decades of achievement, nevertheless expresses an urgency to confront what he thinks are the blind alleys toward which many may be rushing, and to try to coax his field in the direction he thinks things should go. "We see a lot of claims as to what should we do to push forward towards human-level AI," he says.


Beth Goss: Leveling up games for kids

#artificialintelligence

Join gaming executives to discuss emerging parts of the industry this October at GamesBeat Summit Next. Beth Goss was recently appointed as the CEO of kid game company Outright Games. To do that, the former chief brand officer at 20th Century Fox had to relocate her family from the U.S. to London. That tells you the nature of the opportunity. And now she is running a kids' video game publisher behind the likes of Peppa Pig, Paw Patrol and Star Trek titles. Goss has held positions with some of the biggest entertainment companies in the world including Universal Pictures and Cartoon Network. Goss wants to transform the family-operated publisher into a global player in the video games market, which has traditionally operated exclusively in games for young children. Goss is applying lessons and industry practices from her traditional entertainment background into gaming.


How Babies Mess With Everybody's Brains

Slate

Slate has relationships with various online retailers. If you buy something through our links, Slate may earn an affiliate commission. We update links when possible, but note that deals can expire and all prices are subject to change. All prices were up to date at the time of publication. Chelsea Conaboy's new book, Mother Brain: How Neuroscience Is Rewriting the Story of Parenthood, is an ambitious look at new science investigating how caregiving changes everyone who does it. Conaboy draws on research from neuroscience and psychology to make sense of the challenging transitions of early parenthood.


An A.I. Beat Human Artists in a Competition. Will It Come for Their Jobs Next?

Slate

Last month, a piece of art called Théâtre D'opéra Spatial (that's French for "Space Opera Theater") was entered into the Colorado State Fair's fine art competition by a man named Jason Allen. The piece is a gorgeous "painting" that depicts a giant baroque hall containing three women in flowing red and white robes. The image won first place in the digitally manipulated photography category, and the artist judges at the state fair said the work was the best of the best. At the fair, Allen said the piece was made with Midjourney, an artificial intelligence tool that can create art, but no one really understood what that meant. Once they realized an A.I.-generated piece of art had beaten human artist-created images, a debate opened up.


MuZero: the undefeatable player

#artificialintelligence

A look at MuZero, the most advanced reinforcement algorithm ever. You are given this task- learn to play a game, but you won't be told the game's rules or have someone to play against. All you will be told is if a particular move is legal and if the game has ended. Do you think you can learn to play this game? And learn it to a superhuman extent.