Transportation


I drove my first all-electric car. It reminded me of my distracting smartphone.

Mashable

I was driving a Jaguar -- my first time in the driver's seat of any vehicle from the luxury British car maker -- and there wasn't much to hear save for the slight swish of the car moving along the road and the wheels turning against the pavement. But there was so much going on. I was in the I-Pace, Jaguar's first all-electric car that Waymo plans to use for its self-driving taxi service. It's not the world's first electric car, but it was the first I had taken for a spin. SEE ALSO: Jaguar's classic E-Type is back as an all-electric sports car A quick jaunt around the event center made me realize several things: my next car should definitely be electric and this weirdly felt like the car version of my smartphone.


The UK firm hoping to take on Google's driverless cars

BBC News

This week we speak to Stan Boland, founder and chief executive of UK driverless car company Five AI. As firms around the world race to develop self-driving cars, Stan Boland is betting that British brain power can beat American and Chinese cash. A veteran technology entrepreneur, the 58-year-old launched Five AI in 2016. Since then it has been moving as quickly as possible to design a driverless car that - the hope is - will at some point in the future gain regulatory approval to take to the roads without someone being behind the wheel as a human failsafe. The problem is that, compared with US giants Google, Uber and Tesla, Five AI is a tiny start-up company with only a fraction of the funding that its rivals' driverless car projects are receiving.


Artificial Intelligence-driven machines can be fooled, warn IISc researchers

#artificialintelligence

Machine-learning and artificial intelligence algorithms used in sophisticated applications such as for autonomous cars are not foolproof and can be easily manipulated by introducing errors, Indian Institute of Science (IISc) researchers have warned. Machine-learning and AI software are trained with initial sets of data such as images of cats and it learns to identify feline images as more such data are fed. A common example is Google throwing up better results as more people search for the same information. Use of AI applications is becoming mainstream in areas such as healthcare, payments processing, deploying drones to monitor crowds, and for facial recognition in offices and airports. "If your data input is not clear and vetted, the AI machine could throw up surprising results and that could end up being hazardous.


When it Comes to Autonomous Cars, the Department of Transportation Says 'Drivers' Don't Have to Be Human

WIRED

The Department of Transportation is getting a little more creative about how it defines "driver," Secretary Elaine Chao announced Thursday. The computers have a ticket to drive now--at least where federal regulations are concerned. And while this is good news for everyone working on building, and eventually deploying, self-driving vehicles, it's especially welcome for the automated trucking crowd. Waymo, Daimler, Volvo, Embark Trucks, Kache.ai, Starsky and Kodiak Robotics, TuSimple, Ike: Automated trucking companies have boomed this year, even after Uber got out of the trucking race.


Machine learning and data are fueling a new kind of car, brought to you by Intel

#artificialintelligence

Here's why Intel just offered $15.3 billion for Mobileye, an Israeli company that specializes in machine vision and learning for cars. The automobile is being dismantled, reimagined, and rebuilt in Silicon Valley. Intel's proposed $15.3 billion acquisition of Mobileye, an Israeli company that supplies carmakers with a computer-vision technology and advanced driver assistance systems, offers a chance to measure the scale of this rebuild. In particular, it shows how valuable on-the-road data is likely to be in the evolution of automated driving. While the price tag might seem steep, especially with so many players in the automated driving space today, Mobileye has some key technological strengths and strategic advantages.


The Economics and Benefits of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

We see news about AI everywhere; sometimes, we see the excitement around AI and sometimes we see articles that talk about how AI will replace or destroy our jobs. We also see the occasional article talking about how AI will destroy humanity. In this article, I will not discuss an artificial general intelligence or an evil AI that wants to destroy humanity. I will focus on current AI, which is mostly based on the algorithms that can do predictions, and discuss how the economics of AI works and how it may affect business. I also want to mention that the content of this article is highly affected by (and this author highly recommends for further reading) Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence and Human Machine: Reimagining Work in the Age of AI.


Will 5G be necessary for self-driving cars?

BBC News

Proponents of 5G say it will offer ultra-fast connections, speedier data downloads, and be able to handle millions more connections than 4G mobile networks can cope with today. One use for 5G is self-driving cars, but will they really need it? The telecoms industry envisions autonomous cars equipped with hundreds of sensors collecting and receiving information all at once over a network. It calls this concept "Vehicle-to-everything" (V2X). To achieve this, the car needs to detect blind spots and avoid collisions with people, animals or other vehicles on the road.


The Economics and Benefits of Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

We see news about AI everywhere; sometimes, we see the excitement around AI and sometimes we see articles that talk about how AI will replace or destroy our jobs. We also see the occasional article talking about how AI will destroy humanity. In this article, I will not discuss an artificial general intelligence or an evil AI that wants to destroy humanity. I will focus on current AI, which is mostly based on the algorithms that can do predictions, and discuss how the economics of AI works and how it may affect business. I also want to mention that the content of this article is highly affected by (and this author highly recommends for further reading) Prediction Machines: The Simple Economics of Artificial Intelligence and Human Machine: Reimagining Work in the Age of AI.


Driverless Hype Collides With Merciless Reality

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Hardly a week goes by without fresh signposts that our self-driving future is just around the corner. It will likely take decades to come to fruition. And many of the companies that built their paper fortunes on the idea we'd get there soon are already adjusting their strategies to fit this reality. Uber, for example, recently closed its self-driving truck project, and suspended road testing self-driving cars after one of its vehicles killed a pedestrian. Uber's chief executive even announced he would be open to partnering with its biggest competitor in self-driving tech, Alphabet Inc. subsidiary Waymo.


Elon Musk said a Tesla could drive itself across the country by 2018. One just crashed backing out of a garage.

Washington Post

When Mangesh Gururaj's wife left home to pick up their child from math lessons one Sunday earlier this month, she turned on her Tesla Model S and hit "Summon," a self-parking feature that the electric automaker has promoted as a central step toward driverless cars. But as the family's $65,000 sedan reversed itself out of the garage, Gururaj said, the car abruptly struck the garage's side wall, ripping its front end off with a loud crack. The maimed Tesla looked as if it would have kept driving, Gururaj said, if his wife hadn't hit the brakes. No one was hurt, but Gururaj was rattled: The car had failed disastrously, during the simplest of maneuvers, using one of the most basic features from the self-driving technology he and his family had trusted many times at higher speeds. "This is just a crash in the garage.