Information Technology


Self Driving Cars, The Most Hyped Thing Sinceā€¦The Segway?

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With headlines like these, it's hard not to get excited about autonomy and self driving cars. After all, we've seen the cars in Minority Report, Total Recall, and iRobot, and thought to ourselves: "When can we finally get into those cars?" Truth be told, it may be quite a while before we're actually there. There's a general misalignment between what the public think is "fully autonomous" versus what these executives are actually saying. Elon Musk's 2018 goal is to have a self driving car that's safer than a human driver.


Ola Ties Up With Microsoft For Connected Car Platform - NDTV CarAndBike

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Indian ride-hailing firm Ola said it has tied up with Microsoft to build a connected-car platform and will use the U.S tech giant's Azure cloud-computing service to power its in-car entertainment offering. Microsoft is separately also in talks over a potential investment in Ola, a source told Reuters, declining to be named as the discussions are private. The new connected-vehicle platform, for cars that have internet access, will have features to aid navigation and to flag when vehicle maintenance is required, Ola said in a statement on Tuesday. "Both companies will collaborate to take this platform to car manufacturers globally to integrate with vehicle systems," Ola said, making the announcement during a visit to India by Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Ola, which has been locked in a fierce battle with rival Uber for a bigger piece of India's $12 billion taxi market, has said it would invest in artificial intelligence and machine-learning capabilities, which include technologies like its in-car entertainment platform called Play that allows riders to choose music and stream videos.


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Daily Mail

This futuristic footage shows driverless 4x4s being directed by unseen British soldiers using games console-style controllers in a world first. The Ministry of Defence yesterday announced it has worked with the US to trial an improved method of transporting food, fuel and ammunition to the front line. Over the course of a week, 'hoverbikes' and robotic trucks were tested in Michigan for the first time ever. It is hoped that remote control of vehicles will limit risks to soldiers by making'autonomous resupply' the norm. Footage from an exercise three years in the making shows a robotic convoy of trucks race across the vast landscape led by the six-tonne British Army MAN SV.


The race to own the autonomous super highway: Digging deeper into Broadcom's offer to buy Qualcomm

Robohub

Governor Andrew Cuomo of the State of New York declared last month that New York City will join 13 other states in testing self-driving cars: "Autonomous vehicles have the potential to save time and save lives, and we are proud to be working with GM and Cruise on the future of this exciting new technology." For General Motors, this represents a major milestone in the development of its Cruise software, since the the knowledge gained on Manhattan's busy streets will be invaluable in accelerating its deep learning technology. In the spirit of one-upmanship, Waymo went one step further by declaring this week that it will be the first car company in the world to ferry passengers completely autonomously (without human engineers safeguarding the wheel). As unmanned systems are speeding ahead toward consumer adoption, one challenge that Cruise, Waymo and others may counter within the busy canyons of urban centers is the loss of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite data. Robots require a complex suite of coordinating data systems that bounce between orbiting satellites to provide positioning and communication links to accurately navigate our world.


Microsoft extends AirSim to include autonomous car research - Microsoft Research

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Earlier this year, we open-sourced a research project called AirSim, a high-fidelity system for testing the safety of artificial intelligence systems. AirSim provides realistic environments, vehicle dynamics and sensing for research into how autonomous vehicles that use AI that can operate safely in the open world. Today, we are sharing an update to AirSim: We have extended the system to include car simulation, which will help advance the research and development of self-driving vehicles. The latest version is available now on GitHub as an open-source, cross-platform offering. The updated version of AirSim also includes many other features and enhancements, including additional tools for testing airborne vehicles.


Sexist self-driving car ad says the biggest benefit of AI is keeping women from driving

Mashable

Chinese search giant Baidu has a self-driving car project in development that aims to put its autonomous driving platform into vehicles as early as next year. The company's latest attempt at a viral promotion is far from anything you'd expect to see from one of the world's most advanced autonomous projects, however -- or really any major brand in 2017. Baidu's US Twitter account posted a short video today about how self-driving cars will make the world a better place. The skit opens with two women leaving work talking about makeup, and it quickly goes downhill from there. Imagine a future where in-car arguments over'someone's' bad driving are obsolete!


How to Survive a Robot Apocalypse: Just Close the Door

Wall Street Journal

In the meantime, if one of them goes berserk, here's a useful tactic: Shut the door behind you. One after another, robots in a government-sponsored contest were stumped by an unlocked door that blocked their path at an outdoor obstacle course. One bipedal machine managed to wrap a claw around the door handle and open it but was flummoxed by a breeze that kept blowing the door shut before it could pass through. Robots excel at many tasks, as long as they don't involve too much hand-eye coordination or common sense. Like some gifted children, they can perform impressive feats of mental arithmetic but are profoundly klutzy on the playground.


WATCH: Comedian Lil Duval Smokes Marijuana While Tesla Runs On Autopilot

International Business Times

Comedian Lil Duval aka Roland Powell's latest Instagram video immediately became a sensation as it shows him smoking a hollowed out cigar with the autopilot feature of his Tesla vehicle allowing him to take his hands completely off the steering wheel. The stand-up comedian, MTV2 host and music video star is seen blowing out plumes of smoke while the Maze and Frankie Beverly song, "Silky Soul," can be heard playing over the car's speakers. Lil Duval is casually reclined back smoking as the Tesla autopilot, self-driving computer system has taken full control of the vehicle. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has suggested in the past that by 2019 drivers will be able to sleep in their fully autonomous vehicles. "What y'all fake caring about today," the comedian asks on his lilduval Instagram post from Saturday.


"Scientists are still suspicious of AI" - Globes English

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In March 2016, Google's Alphago artificial intelligence (AI) program stunned the world by beating the human world champion Go player in front of 200 million spectators. This was living proof of the potential in AI technology and the level of maturity reached by neural network and deep learning technologies. Those astounded by the success included quite a few engineers and managers who have been leading the AI revolution in the world in recent years. One of these was Intel VP Naveen Rao, general manager of the company's Artificial Intelligence Products Group, which was founded last year. "When I studied at college in the 1990s, we regarded artificial intelligence as'creative work'," Rao relates.


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Daily Mail

Driverless cars face a'real risk' of being hacked en masse when they are introduced to Britain, an expert has warned. The connected nature of these vehicles could make them a'target' for hackers, according to evidence submitted to Parliament. Matthew Channon, an insurance expert on driverless cars from Exeter University, has written to MPs to warn of the danger of road accidents. The connected nature of these vehicles could make them a'target' for hackers, according to evidence submitted to Parliament (stock image) Technology experts agree that'connected and autonomous vehicles' without drivers are at risk, following two high-profile US hacks of cars. There are concerns terrorists could fool the automated cars into detecting obstacles which are not there and remotely slam on their brakes.