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The mystery of the cars abandoned in a robot car park

BBC News

The mystery of why a handful of cars were abandoned in a derelict car park in Edinburgh may have been solved. The £5m Autosafe SkyPark used robots to stack cars and was dubbed the "car park of the future" - but went into receivership in 2003. After lying empty for more than a decade, the building in Morrison Street is now being demolished. And the work has uncovered eight cars which were left behind when the doors were closed. Images of the abandoned vehicles has sparked a number of theories about why they were never removed.


Could a hacker hijack your connected car?

BBC News

As more carmakers adopt "over the air (OTA)" software updates for their increasingly connected and autonomous cars, is the risk of hacker hijack also increasing? And earlier this year, Tesla boss Elon Musk warned about the dangers of hackers potentially taking control of thousands of driverless cars. Meanwhile, Bosch is planning to start offering OTA updates through control units and in-car communication infrastructure developed in-house, distributing the updates via its "internet of things" (IoT) cloud. Tesla unlocked the extra power by sending an OTA update to the cars via wi-fi or 4G.


What will stop these self-driving lorries colliding?

BBC News

Swedish transport company Scania believes lorries could use far less fuel if they drove much closer together, controlled by wirelessly communicating onboard computers. This is because every wi-fi signal has a defined range, whereas 5G will be flexible, enabling mobile devices to switch automatically between the various newly available frequencies. This flexibility will lead to "an ever-expanding array of new business services", Mr Tafazolli believes, and could be critical to the success of autonomous vehicles and the internet of things. Faster wireless connectivity should also give VR and augmented reality (AR) technologies a boost, argues Digital Catapult's Mr Scott.


The one law of robotics: Humans must flourish

BBC News

According to Prof Dame Ottoline Leyser, who co-chairs the Royal Society's science policy advisory group, human flourishing should be the key to how intelligent systems governed. The report calls for a new body to ensure intelligent machines serve people rather than control them. The report calls for safeguards to prioritise the interests of humans over machines. It suggests a "stewardship body" of experts and interested parties should build an ethical framework for the development of artificial intelligence technologies.


Ocado trials driverless delivery van in London

BBC News

"We have chosen it to work specifically in this type of environment, where bigger vehicles are not allowed," said Graeme Smith, chief executive of robotics company Oxbotica, which developed the vehicle. The CargoPod trial was part of a broader £8m research project into driverless technology, using the Greenwich area as a test location. Chief executive Paul Clark said driverless delivery was "a natural stage in the progression of our transport technologies". While Amazon is developing a drone delivery service, Ocado had no immediate plans to follow suit, Mr Clark said.


Petrol stations to go electric

BBC News

The measure forms part of a government push to increase the number of electric vehicles on UK roads. The Automated and Electric Vehicles Bill also contains plans to push driverless car technology. But, he added: "Legislation enabling driverless cars doesn't mean that there will be a universal buy-in overnight. Official government research suggests that the market for automated vehicles in the UK will be worth £28bn by 2035.


General election 2017: Workers' rights v robo jobs - a quandary for all campaigns

BBC News

What are the parties vying for power in the general election saying on the subject? Advances in artificial intelligence (AI) - a field of computer science in which machines are taught to carry out tasks that require human traits of thought or intelligence - have led some to predict a knock-on catastrophe for jobs. Up to 46% of jobs in Scotland could be at risk within the next decade, the Institute for Public Policy Research Scotland recently claimed. This time around machines are coming for our cognitive jobs," said Mr Chace.


Driverless shuttle bus to be tested by public in London

BBC News

Members of the British public are getting their first extended trial of a driverless shuttle bus. Over the next three weeks, about 100 people will travel in a prototype shuttle on a route in Greenwich, London. The vehicle, which travels up to 10mph (16.1kmph), will be controlled by a computer. However, there will be a trained person on board who can stop the shuttle if required. Oxbotica, the firm that developed the shuttle, said 5,000 members of the public had applied to take part in the study.


Uber suspends self-driving cars after Arizona crash

BBC News

Uber has pulled its self-driving cars from the roads after an accident which left one of the vehicles on its side. Pictures posted online showed the car on its right side on an Arizona street, next to another badly damaged vehicle. The car - a Volvo SUV - was in self-driving mode at the time of the crash, on Friday, Uber said. A spokeswoman for the police in Tempe, Arizona said the accident occurred when another vehicle "failed to yield" to the Uber car at a left turn. "There was a person behind the wheel.


Driverless cars 'could lead to complacency'

BBC News

However, the Lords Science and Technology Committee noted that some technology could reduce accidents caused by human error. Level 0 is a vehicle with no automation, while level 5 is fully automated. There is a "very dangerous" problem that lies with vehicles on the midway point of this scale, peers on the Lords Science and Technology Committee said. The risk that the vehicle may need to hand back control to an unprepared driver in an emergency may be "too great to tolerate", the Lords Science and Technology Committee said.