Results


Trump abandons 'life saving' plan for car communication

Daily Mail

The Trump administration has quietly set aside plans to require new cars to be able to wirelessly talk to each other, auto industry officials said, jeopardizing one of the most promising technologies for preventing traffic deaths. The Obama administration proposed last December that all new cars and light trucks come equipped with technology known as vehicle-to-vehicle communications, or V2V. The Transportation Department estimates the technology has the potential to prevent or reduce the severity of up to 80 percent of collisions that don't involve alcohol or drugs. A pedestrian crosses in front of a vehicle as part of a demonstration at Mcity on its opening day on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Trump administration has quietly set aside plans to require new cars to be able to wirelessly talk to each other, auto industry officials said, jeopardizing one of the most promising technologies for preventing traffic deaths.


Designing Streets for Self-Driving Cars: Parks Instead of Parking Meters

WIRED

Urban planners talk about two visions of the future city: heaven and hell. Hell, in case it's not clear, is bad--cities built for technologies, big companies, and vehicles instead of the humans who actually live in them. And hell, in some ways, is here. Today's US cities are dominated by highways there were built by razing residential neighborhoods. It's all managed by public policies that incentivize commuting in your car.


Key Applications of the Smart IoT to Transform Transportation

@machinelearnbot

The applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) have been growing dramatically in recent a few years. According to IDC, the transportation sector will be among the first to see a significant growth from the IoT, and the global IoT market in the transportation sector is expected to reach $195 billion by 2020. The smart IoT is dramatically accelerating the pace of innovation and transforming the way of operations in transportation and infrastructure. The ubiquitous deployment of smart, connected sensors and things, combined with artificial intelligence (AI) and big data analytics, can enable us to gather insightful knowledge, make real-time and even predictive computing to help us reaching better decisions and developing better plans to improve the safety, efficiency, and reliability of smart transportation. Here we take a look at some important applications of the IoT in intelligent transportation systems and smart cities.


Waymo is the first company to give a detailed self-driving safety report to federal officials

Los Angeles Times

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has suggested a set of 28 "behavioral competencies," or basic things an autonomous vehicle should be able to do. Some are exceedingly basic ("detect and respond to stopped vehicles," "navigate intersections and perform turns"); others, more intricate ("respond to citizens directing traffic after a crash.) "This overview of our safety program reflects the important lessons learned through the 3.5 million miles Waymo's vehicles have self-driven on public roads, and billions of miles of simulated driving, over the last eight years," Waymo Chief Executive John Krafcik said in a letter Thursday to U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. "You can't expect to program the car for everything you're possibly going to see," said Ron Medford, Waymo's safety director and a former senior National Highway Traffic Safety Administration official.


Michigan's self driving car complex revealed

Daily Mail

The $6.5 million facility has 40 building facades, angled intersections, a traffic circle, a bridge, a tunnel, gravel roads, and plenty of obstructed views The $6.5 million facility has 40 building facades, angled intersections, a traffic circle, a bridge, a tunnel, gravel roads, and plenty of obstructed views. Mcity is a 32-acre simulated urban and suburban environment that includes a network of roads with intersections, traffic signs and signals, streetlights, building facades, sidewalks and construction obstacles. M-City include a network of roads with up to five lanes, intersections, roundabouts, roadway markings, traffic signs and signals, sidewalks, bus facilities, benches, simulated buildings, streetlights, parked cars, pedestrians and obstacles like construction barriers. M-City include a network of roads with up to five lanes, intersections, roundabouts, roadway markings, traffic signs and signals, sidewalks, bus facilities, benches, simulated buildings, streetlights, parked cars, pedestrians and obstacles like construction barriers.


Self-Driving Guidelines Issued: Will Help Make Roads Safer With Fewer Fatalities

International Business Times

It will focus on three categories -- conditional assistance, high assistance and fully automated self-driving. Forward Collision Warning: Sensors will detect and warn the car's systems of a potential collision and help minimize loss of life. Automatic Emergency Braking: In case of an imminent collision, the car's systems will apply brakes automatically. Pedestrian Automatic Emergency Braking: The cars' sensors will especially detect pedestrians and warn the human driver inside, along with the car's systems and brakes will be automatically applied to ensure the pedestrians' safety.


Department Of Transportation Rolls Out New Guidelines For Self-Driving Cars

NPR

A Ford Fusion development vehicle equipped with autonomous controls, seen at a test facility Tuesday in Ann Arbor, Mich. A Ford Fusion development vehicle equipped with autonomous controls, seen at a test facility Tuesday in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Department of Transportation released its revised guidelines on automated driving systems Tuesday, outlining its recommended -- but not mandatory -- best practices for companies developing self-driving cars. On the same day the new plan relaxed guidance on Level 2 vehicles, the National Transportation Safety Board faulted a Tesla automated driving system for playing a "major role" in a collision that killed its test driver last year. "Just as the NTSB says the government and industry should be stepping up its efforts to ensure the safety of Level 2 automated vehicles," he added, "the Department of Transportation and Secretary Chao are rolling back their responsibility in that space."


Driverless cars on public highways? Go for it, Trump administration says

Los Angeles Times

Under those guidelines, automakers and technology companies will be asked to voluntarily submit safety assessments to the U.S. Department of Transportation, but they don't have to do it. Last week, the House of Representatives passed a bill that eventually would let automakers each put as many as even if some features don't meet current safety standards set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The new standards replace guidelines published by the Obama administration in September 2016 that asked automakers to voluntarily submit reports on a 15-point "safety assessment." The new "Vision for Safety" advises state officials to remain technology-neutral and not favor traditional automakers over technology companies; to remove regulatory barriers that keep driverless cars off the roads; and to make the federal Transportation Department's voluntary recommendations into law.


US DOT outlines safe transition to self-driving cars

Engadget

Odds are that we'll see autonomous cars on the road sooner rather than later, thanks to this bill and new voluntary guidance The US Department of Transportation and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The governmental agencies released new guidelines on Tuesday that provide federal guidance for automated driving systems to both individual states and businesses. "The safe deployment of automated vehicle technologies means we can look forward to a future with fewer traffic fatalities and increased mobility for all Americans." Called "A Vision for Safety 2.0," the voluntary guidelines build on the previous policy by focusing on the next three levels of automated driving systems (ADSs): conditional assistance, high assistance, and fully automated systems.


Senate will consider legislation for self-driving trucks

Engadget

The bill does not include legislation regarding autonomous big-rig trucks, however, so the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation is planning a hearing for September 13th to discuss potential implications for self-driving commercial vehicles. According to a Senate press release, "Transportation Innovation: Automated Trucks and our Nation's Highways ... will examine the benefits of automated truck safety technology as well as the potential impacts on jobs and the economy. The hearing is sponsored by Senator John Thune of South Dakota and will include testimony from the chief of the Colorado State Patrol, Colonel Scott G Hernandez, Navistar's CEO Troy Clarke, National Safety Council CEO Deborah Hersman and CEO of the American Trucking Associations, Chris Spear. Colorado's autonomous impact protection vehicle is set to protect road workers, Einride's self-driving elecrtic vehicle can transport 15 pallets and of course Uber and Waymo continue to try and one-up each other with self-driving big rigs.