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4 industries you probably didn't realize could be impacted by net neutrality

Mashable

With a historic net neutrality vote set to take place tomorrow, people across the United States are rightly concerned about the future of the internet. Visions of price-tiered online spaces dancing in their heads, constituents all over the country are reaching out to their elected officials in a likely doomed effort to forestall what many see as the inevitable destruction of our mostly level digital playing field. But tomorrow's vote is about more than whether Comcast can charge you extra for streaming movies on Netflix. Just as the internet has seeped into many unexpected facets of our lives, abandoning net neutrality could have unexpected consequences in places you might not expect. If Elon Musk is correct, driverless cars could soon be everywhere.


Apple gives rare private demo of driverless car system

Daily Mail

A driverless car system under development at Apple has been showcased to a select group of machine learning experts. The firm's director of AI is reported to have shared secret details of its ongoing automated motoring projects at an industry event. This is believed to included the tech company's self-driving technology that uses laser sensors, called'VoxelNet', to spot cyclists and pedestrians. A driverless car system under development at Apple has been showcased to a select group of machine learning experts. The firm's director of AI is reported to have shared secret details of its ongoing automated driving projects at an industry event'VoxelNet' was first revealed in a paper, submitted on November 17 to independent online journal arXiv, by Yin Zhou and Oncel Tuze.


Autonomous Driving Levels 0–5 Implications

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous driving systems are changing the way we think about the future of personal transportation. How soon will we have access to vehicles that don't require human control? Are driverless cars just around the corner? What will our travel be like if we're spending a lot less time behind the wheel? What technology actually makes autonomous driving possible?


Making Artificial Intelligence compact

#artificialintelligence

Deep learning, an advanced machine-learning technique, uses layered (hence "deep") neural networks (neural nets) that are loosely modelled on the human brain. Machine learning itself is a subset of Artificial Intelligence (AI), and is broadly about teaching a computer how to spot patterns and use mountains of data to make connections without any programming to accomplish the specific task--a recommendation engine being a good example. Neural nets, on their part, enable image recognition, speech recognition, self-driving cars and smarthome automation devices, among other things. However, the success of deep learning is primarily dependent on the availability of huge data sets on which these neural nets can be trained, coupled with a lot of computing power, memory and energy to function. To address this issue, says a 14 November press release, researchers at the University of Waterloo, Canada, took a cue from nature to make this process more efficient, thus making deep-learning software compact enough to fit on mobile computer chips for use in everything from smartphones to industrial robots.


Apple reveals first details of its driverless car system

Daily Mail

While Apple hasn't hid its self-driving car ambitions, until now, little has been known about the mysterious project. But now, computer scientists at the firm have posted a paper online, shedding light on how the self-driving cars could work. The paper reveals that Apple's self-driving cars can better spot cyclists and pedestrians using laser sensors, in a new software approach called'VoxelNet.' While Apple hasn't hid its self-driving car ambitions, until now, little has been known about the mysterious project. Self-driving cars often use a combination of normal two-dimensional cameras and depth-sensing'LiDAR' units to recognize the world around them.


Ray Massey says driverless car technology not yet ready

Daily Mail

The most dangerous part of any car, say the experts, 'is the nut behind the steering wheel'. Human error is to blame for most accidents, so remove that'nut' and let the car drive itself and many lives will be saved, runs the argument now pushed by ministers, manufacturers and supporters of what is known as'autonomous driving'. And it certainly seems as if it's full speed ahead for the driverless car. The Prime Minister Theresa May and Chancellor Philip Hammond yesterday confirmed plans -- widely trailed ahead of the Budget tomorrow -- to invest £900 million to deliver'fully driverless cars' by 2021. But is the Government right to be putting its foot on the accelerator?


Scientists Look at How Humans Drive in Self-Driving Cars

WIRED

But if you were being very precise--if you were a team of Massachusetts of Technology researchers who study human-machine interactions--you wouldn't say that all those Americans are "driving," exactly. The new driver assistance systems on the market--like Tesla's's Autopilot, Volvo's's Pilot Assist, and Jaguar Land Rover's InControl Driver Assistance--mean that some of those travelers are doing an entirely new thing, participating in a novel, fluid dance. The human handles the wheel in some situations, and the machine handles it in others: changing lanes, parking, monitoring blind spots, warning when the car is about to crash. We might need a new word. Fully autonomous cars won't swarm the roads en masse for decades, and in the meantime, we'll have these semiautonomous systems.


Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper

#artificialintelligence

Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy "smart" cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior. The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and "give an extra set of eyes" to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment. "We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs," said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a "dashcam on steroids." The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret "profiling" and misuse of data. US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.


"Scientists are still suspicious of AI" - Globes English

#artificialintelligence

In March 2016, Google's Alphago artificial intelligence (AI) program stunned the world by beating the human world champion Go player in front of 200 million spectators. This was living proof of the potential in AI technology and the level of maturity reached by neural network and deep learning technologies. Those astounded by the success included quite a few engineers and managers who have been leading the AI revolution in the world in recent years. One of these was Intel VP Naveen Rao, general manager of the company's Artificial Intelligence Products Group, which was founded last year. "When I studied at college in the 1990s, we regarded artificial intelligence as'creative work'," Rao relates.


tech-design-autonomous-future-cars-100-percent-augmented-reality-policing.html

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Street signage is the iconography of the automobile age. It's like highly functional pop art: silhouettes of schoolchildren, white arrows, rectangular cries of WRONG WAY and, most central of all, the ubiquitous stoplight. The traffic light might be the first part of that iconographic world to be transformed, or vanish altogether, once we are fully in the age of autonomous cars. Robots, after all, won't need signs to optimize the way they move through urban landscapes. Urban-transportation experts have been busily creating computer simulations to show how this might work.