Transportation


cargopod-ocado-oxbotica-driverless-delivery-van

Engadget

Together, these sensors detect and visualise everything around the truck, including cars, pedestrians and lamp posts. The system works with Caesium, a cloud-based platform (also developed by Oxbotica) that can manage and coordinate fleets of autonomous vehicles. The company sells a "smart platform" which gives other companies access to its delivery infrastructure -- the technology behind its apps, its warehouses and delivery vehicles. So it's very important for us to keep innovating and to keep doing exciting technology projects, because that will give us a competitive advantage going forward."


Is It a Car or a Computer?

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Software developers are turning cars into rolling personal computers. Lots of attention is still paid to horsepower, curves in the metal, and giving drivers the ultimate creature comfort behind the wheel: the ability to relax and let the car take over. But even as the industry accelerates toward a self-driving future, it's the touch screen in the dashboard and the slick smartphone app that increasingly sway buyers' decisions in the showroom. Many vehicle models now offer versions of the iPhone or Android interface in the car's touch screen, giving users the familiar look and feel of their smartphones. Meanwhile, app developers are leveraging the car-phone link and improved voice-recognition systems to offer extras such as music streaming and the ability to send or receive text messages with hands on the wheel and eyes on the road.


Self-driving Ubers are now arriving in Pittsburgh

PCWorld

Uber has begun offering customers the chance to ride in one of its autonomous car prototypes. The new service has launched in Pittsburgh, where Uber carries out its high-tech research, and is a sign of confidence by the company in its self-driving car technology. The service is initially being offered to Uber's "most loyal" customers in the city as part of the Uber X service, the company said in a blog post that was short on technical details. The Ford Focus cars being used in the trial will have a human in the driver's seat--someone who should be ready to take over from the computer should it encounter a situation it cannot safely deal with. No U.S. states have legalized self-driving cars without human drivers or steering wheels.


Self-driving Ubers are now arriving in Pittsburgh

PCWorld

Uber has begun offering customers the chance to ride in one of its autonomous car prototypes. The new service has launched in Pittsburgh, where Uber carries out its high-tech research, and is a sign of confidence by the company in its self-driving car technology. The service is initially being offered to Uber's "most loyal" customers in the city as part of the Uber X service, the company said in a blog post that was short on technical details. The Ford Focus cars being used in the trial will have a human in the driver's seat -- someone who should be ready to take over from the computer should it encounter a situation it cannot safely deal with. No U.S. states have legalized self-driving cars without human drivers or steering wheels.


Ford (F) Self-Driving Cars To Be Affordable, Commercially Available By 2025, CEO Says

International Business Times

Until a few years ago, cars that drove themselves seemed like the stuff of science fiction, but with the world's biggest auto manufacturers and technology companies all taking a serious interest, the day doesn't seem far off when we have fully autonomous cars that do not even have a way for their human passengers to take control. How soon such a day will come is anyone's guess, but if you go by what Ford Motor Co. says, at least for itself, it will be in the middle of the next decade. At Ford's headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan, CEO Mark Fields told reporters Monday the company will produce, by 2021, a fleet of self-driving taxis for ride-hailing services and by "around mid-decade we'll make vehicles available for people to purchase for themselves." Arguably the most advanced autonomous cars at present are made by Tesla Motors, owned by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, but they are not cheap. Perhaps referring to them, Fields added: " We're dedicated to putting autonomous vehicles on the road for millions of people, not just those who can afford luxury cars."


Tesla's free Autopilot 8.0 update shifts focus to radar to avoid car crashes

PCWorld

Tesla is rolling out a software update to its Autopilot feature designed to prevent accidents like the one that resulted in the death of Tesla owner Joshua Brown in May. The new update will employ radar as a primary signal processing component in addition to visual image recognition via the car's cameras. Brown died when his car, running on Autopilot, collided with a tractor trailer. In that event, the car's autonomous cruise control systems failed to properly identify the obstacle. This reportedly happened due to the trailer's color blending with the bright sky.


Tesla's Musk says updated Autopilot would likely have prevented Florida fatality

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON – Tesla Motors Co. Chief Executive Elon Musk said Sunday the automaker is updating its semi-autonomous driving system Autopilot with new limits on hands-off driving that likely would have prevented a fatality in May. Musk said the update, which will be available within a week or two through an "over-the-air" software update, will rely foremost on radar to give Tesla's electric luxury cars a better sense of what is around them and when to brake. New restrictions of Autopilot 8.0 are a nod to widespread concerns that autopilot lulled users into a false sense of security through its "hands-off" driving. The updated system now will temporarily prevent drivers from using the system if they fail to respond to audible warnings to take back control of the car. "We're making much more effective use of radar," Musk told journalists on a call.


Tesla says it's improving Autopilot by boosting radar

FOX News

NEW YORK – Tesla CEO Elon Musk says the electric car company is making major improvements to the Autopilot system used by its vehicles, which will dramatically reduce the number and severity of crashes in which they are involved. Sunday's news comes in the wake of a May crash involving a Tesla Model S that was using the semi-autonomous mode at the time. The driver died after crashing into a tractor-trailer. On a conference call with reporters, Musk said he thinks that the improvements, which will roll out globally in the next week or two in the form of a software update, probably would have prevented that crash. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, which is investigating the crash, said Sunday that Tesla has provided it with information about the changes to Autopilot, which it will review.


Elon Musk: Tesla Autopilot Update Could Have Prevented Fatal Crash

Huffington Post

SAN FRANCISCO/WASHINGTON - Tesla Motors Co Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Sunday the automaker was updating its semi-autonomous driving system Autopilot with new limits on hands-off driving and other improvements that likely would have prevented a fatality in May. Musk said the update, which will be available within a week or two through an "over-the-air" software update, would rely foremost on radar to give Tesla's electric luxury cars a better sense of what is around them and when to brake. New restrictions of Autopilot 8.0 are a nod to widespread concerns that the system lulled users into a false sense of security through its "hands-off" driving capability. The updated system now will temporarily prevent drivers from using the system if they do not respond to audible warnings to take back control of the car. "We're making much more effective use of radar," Musk told journalists on a phone call.


Tesla Says New Autopilot Would Likely Have Prevented Fatality

International Business Times

Tesla Motors Co. Chief Executive Elon Musk said on Sunday the automaker was updating its semi-autonomous driving system Autopilot with new limits on hands-off driving that likely would have prevented a fatality in May. Musk said the update, which will be available within a week or two through an "over-the-air" software update, would rely foremost on radar to give Tesla's electric luxury cars a better sense of what is around them and when to brake. New restrictions of Autopilot 8.0 are a nod to widespread concerns that autopilot lulled users into a false sense of security through its "hands-off" driving. The updated system now will temporarily prevent drivers from using the system if they fail to respond to audible warnings to take back control of the car. "We're making much more effective use of radar," Musk told journalists on a call.