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la-na-pol-self-driving-politics-20171121-story.html

Los Angeles Times

In its race to embrace driverless vehicles, Washington has cleared away regulatory hurdles for auto companies and brushed aside consumer warnings about the risk of crashes and hacking. But at a recent hearing, lawmakers absorbed an economic argument that illustrated how the driverless revolution they are encouraging could backfire politically, particularly in Trump country. It was the tale of a successful, long-distance beer run. A robotic truck coasted driverless 120 miles down Interstate 25 in Colorado on its way to deliver 51,744 cans of Budweiser. Not everyone at the hearing was impressed by the milestone, particularly the secretary-treasurer of the Teamsters, whose nearly 600,000 unionized drivers played no small roll in President Trump's victory last year.


Self Driving Cars, The Most Hyped Thing Since…The Segway?

#artificialintelligence

With headlines like these, it's hard not to get excited about autonomy and self driving cars. After all, we've seen the cars in Minority Report, Total Recall, and iRobot, and thought to ourselves: "When can we finally get into those cars?" Truth be told, it may be quite a while before we're actually there. There's a general misalignment between what the public think is "fully autonomous" versus what these executives are actually saying. Elon Musk's 2018 goal is to have a self driving car that's safer than a human driver.


BMW-FCA autonomous alliance wants third major partner

#artificialintelligence

BMW and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles are seeking one more automaker to join their autonomous driving partnership. If the technology develops fast enough, BMW is open to selling a Level 3-equipped iNEXT to retail consumers and Level 4 or 5 cars to ride-sharing fleets, Frickenstein said. Project partners are driving the vehicles, developing software algorithms and collecting data from cameras, radar and lidar technology. That data are being crunched at a separate autonomous driving data center that opened near Munich.


End of the road: will automation put an end to the American trucker?

The Guardian

Google, Uber, Tesla and the major truck manufacturers are looking to a future in which people like Baxter will be replaced – or at the very least downgraded to co-pilots – by automated vehicles that will save billions but will cost millions of jobs. The family-run Iowa 80 has been serving truckers for 53 years, and is so confident about its future that it is expanding to secure its claim to being the world's biggest truck stop, adding more restaurants and shopping space to the "Disneyland of truckers". In July, the powerful Teamsters union successfully pushed Congress to slow legislation for states looking to broaden the use of autonomous vehicles. But the automation that seems to most concern drivers at Iowa 80 concerns their log books.


Digital Engineering: Convergence of Disruptive Technologies

@machinelearnbot

Due to globalization, design & engineering companies face increasing competition and major disruptions in their core products and business models. The Summit addressed the transformation to Digital Engineering in this constrained environment; explaining how the convergence of disruptive technologies helps companies to fully capture the benefits of digitalization. Engaging an audience of about 700, various topics were discussed: supply chain complexity, the role of robots in powering e-commerce and supply chains, intelligent automation, connected mobility etc. Global companies are investing in operating systems for connected vehicles, opening a range of new consumer services and vehicle management features.


At Toyota, The Automation Is Human-Powered

#artificialintelligence

On the assembly line in Toyota's low-strung, sprawling Georgetown, Kentucky factory, worker ingenuity pops up in the least expected places. Even as the automaker unveils an updated version of its vaunted production system, called the Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA), the company has resisted the very modern allure of automation–a particularly contrarian stance to take in the car industry, which is estimated to be responsible for over half of commercial robot purchases in North America. Despite its dry subject, this book had a radical impact inside and outside of the business community–for the first time, unveiling the mysteries of Japanese industrial expertise and popularizing terms like lean production, continuous improvement, andon assembly lines, seven wastes or mudas and product flow. Codified as the Toyota New Global Architecture, this strategy doesn't primarily target labor to reduce production expenses but instead is weighted toward smarter use of materials; reengineering automobiles so their component parts are lighter and more compact and their weight distribution is maxed out for performance and fuel efficiency; more economical global sharing of engine and vehicle models (trimming back more than 100 different platforms to fewer than ten); and a renewed emphasis on elusive lean concepts, such as processes that allow assembly lines to produce a different car one after another with no downtime.


Automation -- The New Mantra – Why Rusty? Spark!

#artificialintelligence

During the last 5 years, self sufficient vehicles had been a huge speaking aspect among-st engineers, tech professionals, and scientists. Independent cars may make our lives easier in a hundred alternative ways. Countless research have proved that self-driving automobiles have the possible to reduce road collisions by means of up to 90%. So, it's transparent that autonomous vehicles have so much to supply.


Regulating AI – The Road Ahead

@machinelearnbot

Summary: With only slight tongue in cheek about the road ahead we report on the just passed House of Representative's new "Federal Automated Vehicle Policy" as well as similar policy just emerging in Germany. Just today (9/6/17) the US House of Representatives released its 116 page "Federal Automated Vehicles Policy". Equally as interesting is that just two weeks ago the German federal government published its guidelines for Highly Automated Vehicles (HAV being the new name of choice for these vehicles). On the 6 point automation scale in which 0 is no automation and 5 is where the automated system can perform all driving tasks, under all conditions, the new policy applies to level 3 or higher (though the broad standards also apply to the partial automation in levels 1 and 2).


Department Of Transportation Rolls Out New Guidelines For Self-Driving Cars

NPR

A Ford Fusion development vehicle equipped with autonomous controls, seen at a test facility Tuesday in Ann Arbor, Mich. A Ford Fusion development vehicle equipped with autonomous controls, seen at a test facility Tuesday in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Department of Transportation released its revised guidelines on automated driving systems Tuesday, outlining its recommended -- but not mandatory -- best practices for companies developing self-driving cars. On the same day the new plan relaxed guidance on Level 2 vehicles, the National Transportation Safety Board faulted a Tesla automated driving system for playing a "major role" in a collision that killed its test driver last year. "Just as the NTSB says the government and industry should be stepping up its efforts to ensure the safety of Level 2 automated vehicles," he added, "the Department of Transportation and Secretary Chao are rolling back their responsibility in that space."


At Toyota, The Automation Is Human-Powered

#artificialintelligence

On the assembly line in Toyota's low-strung, sprawling Georgetown, Kentucky factory, worker ingenuity pops up in the least expected places. Even as the automaker unveils an updated version of its vaunted production system, called the Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA), the company has resisted the very modern allure of automation–a particularly contrarian stance to take in the car industry, which is estimated to be responsible for over half of commercial robot purchases in North America. Despite its dry subject, this book had a radical impact inside and outside of the business community–for the first time, unveiling the mysteries of Japanese industrial expertise and popularizing terms like lean production, continuous improvement, andon assembly lines, seven wastes or mudas and product flow. Codified as the Toyota New Global Architecture, this strategy doesn't primarily target labor to reduce production expenses but instead is weighted toward smarter use of materials; reengineering automobiles so their component parts are lighter and more compact and their weight distribution is maxed out for performance and fuel efficiency; more economical global sharing of engine and vehicle models (trimming back more than 100 different platforms to fewer than ten); and a renewed emphasis on elusive lean concepts, such as processes that allow assembly lines to produce a different car one after another with no downtime.