Results


The 5 biggest questions we still have about the Tesla Semi

Mashable

Tesla finally unveiled its heavy-duty, all-electric Semi truck, and we're impressed. The big rig is the sum of all of the automaker's work in one massive package, featuring design cues from its other vehicles and even borrowing their parts, like the Model 3 motors that power each of its "super single" wheels. Musk claims the Semi will also offer truckers BAMF acceleration and performance specs, up to 500 miles of range per charge, and a cheaper cost to operate than standard diesel trucks. The Semi certainly looks the part of the next big thing for the trucking industry -- but there's still so much about it that we don't know. Elon Musk only showed off certain aspects of the truck during his presentation, leaving some very important features to be shared at a later date, when Tesla is ready to start churning out the rigs for clients.


California may limit liability of self-driving carmakers

Daily Mail

California regulators are embracing a General Motors recommendation that would help makers of self-driving cars avoid paying for accidents and other trouble, raising concerns that the proposal will put an unfair burden on vehicle owners. If adopted, the regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications. That could open a loophole for automakers to skirt responsibility for accidents, injuries and deaths caused by defective autonomous vehicles, said Armand Feliciano, vice president for the Association of California Insurance Companies. The regulations drafted by the California DMV would protect carmakers from lawsuits in cases where their self driving vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications. The regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications.


Trump abandons 'life saving' plan for car communication

Daily Mail

The Trump administration has quietly set aside plans to require new cars to be able to wirelessly talk to each other, auto industry officials said, jeopardizing one of the most promising technologies for preventing traffic deaths. The Obama administration proposed last December that all new cars and light trucks come equipped with technology known as vehicle-to-vehicle communications, or V2V. The Transportation Department estimates the technology has the potential to prevent or reduce the severity of up to 80 percent of collisions that don't involve alcohol or drugs. A pedestrian crosses in front of a vehicle as part of a demonstration at Mcity on its opening day on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. The Trump administration has quietly set aside plans to require new cars to be able to wirelessly talk to each other, auto industry officials said, jeopardizing one of the most promising technologies for preventing traffic deaths.


This image is why self-driving cars need many types of sensors

#artificialintelligence

Autonomous cars often proudly claim to be fitted with a long list of sensors--cameras, ultrasound, radar, lidar, you name it. But if you've ever wondered why so many sensors are required, look no further than this picture. You're looking at what's known in the autonomous-car industry as an "edge case"--a situation where a vehicle might have behaved unpredictably because its software processed an unusual scenario differently from the way a human would. In this example, image-recognition software applied to data from a regular camera has been fooled into thinking that images of cyclists on the back of a van are genuine human cyclists. This particular blind spot was identified by researchers at Cognata, a firm that builds software simulators--essentially, highly detailed and programmable computer games--in which automakers can test autonomous-driving algorithms.


Alphabet looks to snowy Michigan to test self-driving cars

Daily Mail

Alphabet Inc's self-driving car unit Waymo is expanding winter testing as it works to address a potential blind spot for autonomous vehicles: snowy and icy conditions. Waymo said Thursday that Michigan is the sixth state where the self-driving car project will test autonomous vehicles. The company chose the state to see how vehicles will respond in snow, sleet, and ice. Alphabet Inc's self-driving car unit Waymo is expanding winter testing as it works to address a potential blind spot for autonomous vehicles: snowy and icy conditions. Waymo has been testing vehicles in Texas, Arizona, Washington State, Nevada and California and starts in Michigan next week on public roads with a backup safety driver sitting in the driver seat if necessary.


You can't buy a self-driving BMW until 2021 (and that's a good thing)

Engadget

At this point, if you're an automaker and you're not talking about autonomous cars, you might want to take a long hard look at your product roadmap. During a briefing at its Mountain View research campus, BMW talked about how it plans to bring a level 3 (autonomous driving in very specific circumstances where the driver should be ready to take over control) car to consumers in 2021 and deliver level 4 and 5 ride-hail vehicles to urban pilot programs the same year. Right now a lot of that strategy hinges on its partners while the automaker maintains the BMW brand. The varying degrees of autonomous vehicles the automaker is set to drop in 2021 are nothing new. BMW announced those plans way back in March.


Nissan's all-electric, self-driving concept car could be a glimpse into the (near) future

Mashable

Nissan unveiled its latest concept car at the Tokyo Motor Show, and unlike most forward-looking designs trotted out at auto events, the automaker claims that the tech powering the vehicle isn't as far out in the future as you might expect. The IMx concept is an all-electric, fully autonomous crossover vehicle, embracing the two biggest development trends currently sweeping the auto industry. Nissan SVP Daniele Schillaci said the systems in the IMx will be delivered by the automaker "in the next few years." The car is built on "future" versions of Nissan's ProPILOT assisted-driving tech, which makes its debut in the 2018 Rogue this month, and its EV platform, which has already hit the roads with the Nissan Leaf. Nissan says the IMx's dual electric motors enable all-wheel drive, 320 kW of power and 700 Nm of torque, giving the concept more appeal than just its sleek exterior.


Comma AI's dash cams are a stepping stone to autonomous driving

Engadget

I'm never sure what to expect when I walk up the steps of Comma AIs office (which is actually a house in a San Francisco neighborhood). Its founder and all-around rabble-rouser George Hotz (the iPhone and Playstation hacker more commonly known as geohot) has strong opinions about the automotive industry and how he can fix it. The company's "ghost riding for the masses" tagline won't win over regulators, but Comma AI's longterm goal of running your car's operating system seems doable. But first, it's concentrating on dash cams that tap into your car's data. Comma AI's latest piece of hardware is the EON dash cam developer kit.


GM to test self-driving cars in New York in early 2018

Daily Mail

General Motors Co plans to test vehicles in fully autonomous mode in New York state in early 2018, according to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. The self-driving cars will first take to the streets in Manhattan, with hopes the exposure to a densely populated environment will help accelerate improvements. The planned testing by GM and its self-driving unit, Cruise Automation, will be the first by a Level 4 autonomous vehicle in the state, Cuomo said in a statement. General Motors Co plans to test vehicles in fully autonomous mode in New York state in early 2018, according to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. One of the firm's Bolt EV self-driving test vehicles is pictured above A level 3 car still needs a steering wheel and a driver who can take over if the car encounters a problem, while level 4 promises driverless features in dedicated lanes.


The Big Data Boom Automobile Magazine

@machinelearnbot

With the help of Microsoft, last year Toyota created a new data analytics division called Toyota Connected to bring Internet-connected services into the car. Earlier this year, Renault-Nissan inked a deal to leverage Microsoft's Connected Vehicle Platform and its Azure cloud architecture to collect vehicle sensor and usage data in order to develop "connected driving experiences." Ford recently invested $182 million in Pivotal, a cloud-based software company, in part to create analytics tools and a cloud platform to support the automaker's Smart Mobility initiative. Cadillac introduced the first production vehicle-to-vehicle communication system on its 2017 models, and last year, Audi launched a Traffic Light Information vehicle-to-infrastructure system that lets its cars know how long a light will stay red or green to help improve traffic flow.