Results


Autonomous Cars Loom, but the Detroit Auto Show Goes On

#artificialintelligence

Fiat Chrysler's Ram also got big updates, losing more than 200 pounds and giving it a gas-electric hybrid engine option. Both the Silverado and Ram were given more athletic stances and meaner looks. Ford added a diesel engine to its F-150 and rolled out the midsize Ranger. Automakers turn big profits on large pickups. Sales rose nearly 6 percent last year to almost 2.4 million, even though total U.S. auto sales dropped 2 percent.


Ford plans $11 billion investment, 40 electrified...

Daily Mail

Ford will significantly increase its planned investments in electric vehicles to $11 billion by 2022 and have 40 hybrid and fully electric vehicles in its model lineup, Chairman Bill Ford said at the Detroit auto show. The investment figure is sharply higher than a previously announced target of $4.5 billion by 2020, Ford executives said, and includes the costs of developing dedicated electric vehicle architectures. Ford's engineering, research and development expenses for 2016, the last full year available, were $7.3 billion, up from $6.7 billion in 2015. Of the 40 electrified vehicles Ford plans for its global lineup by 2022, 16 will be fully electric and the rest will be plug-in hybrids, executives said. SUVs figured Ford's electric future The automaker's president of global markets, Jim Farley, said on Sunday that Ford would bring a high-performance electric utility vehicle to market by 2020.


US to 'carefully' review GM request on autonomous car

Daily Mail

Plans for the first mass-production autonomous car without a steering wheel or pedals will be reviewed'carefully and responsibly', US regulators said. Law makers are looking at General Motors' request to test its driverless Cruise AV vehicles on the road sometime next year, with no human backup drivers. The company filed a petition with the US federal government seeking permission to put the vehicles on the road sometime next year. That would let the firm build a fleet of robo-taxis, beating off competition from rivals to launch such a service. The US Transportation Secretary made the comments during a press briefing held yesterday, urging the motor industry to engage with the public over the technology.


Car hacking remains a very real threat as autos become ever more loaded with tech

USATODAY

Should you be worried about a car being hacked? USA TODAY's Jefferson Graham and Chris Woodyard break it down. Model cars run in a city miniature at the Elektrobit booth to show how software for highly automated driving works during CES 2018 in Las Vegas. Automakers and suppliers are making progress in protecting vehicles from cyber attacks, but the car-hacking threat is still real and could get increasingly serious in the future when driverless vehicles begin talking to each other. A worst-case scenario would be hackers infiltrating a vehicle through a minor device, such as an infotainment system, then wreaking havoc by taking control of the vehicle's door locks, brakes, engine or even semi-autonomous driving features.


GM plans to release cars with no steering wheel in 2019

#artificialintelligence

As you can see above, Cruise AV is much different from the self-driving Chevy Bolts GM is testing in California. It has no controls whatsoever, not even buttons you can push -- it 100 percent treats you as a passenger, no matter where you sit. The car can even open and shut doors on its own. Now, autonomous cars like this don't meet the Federal Motor Vehicle's safety standards. Automakers could apply for exemption, but the government can only exempt 2,500 vehicles every year.


GM to build self-driving car fleet without steering wheels

Daily Mail

General Motors says it is making the first mass-production autonomous car without a steering wheel or pedals. The company has filed a petition with the US federal government seeking permission to put the vehicles on the road sometime next year, with no human backup drivers. That would let the firm launch a fleet of robo-taxis, beating off competition from rivals to launch such a service. The location of the service has not yet been revealed, but GM is said to be in talks with representatives of a number of states in the US over the plans. The car will be the fourth generation of its driverless Chevy Bolts, which are currently being tested on public roads in San Francisco and Phoenix.


GM plans to release cars with no steering wheel in 2019

Engadget

If the Department of Transportation grants GM's latest Safety Petition, the automaker will be able to deploy its no-steering-wheel, pedal-less autonomous car next year. GM has not only revealed what its level 4 self-driving vehicle will look like -- in a video you can watch after the break -- but also announced that it filed a Safety Petition to be able to deploy its completely driverless version of Chevy Bolt called Cruise AV in 2019. The company describes it as "the first production-ready vehicle built from the start to operate safely on its own, with no driver, steering wheel, pedals or manual controls." As you can see above, Cruise AV is much different from the self-driving Chevy Bolts GM is testing in California. It has no controls whatsoever, not even buttons you can push -- it 100 percent treats you as a passenger, no matter where you sit.


GM applies to deploy self-driving Cruise AV robo-taxi next year

The Japan Times

DETROIT – General Motors Co. is seeking U.S. government approval to include a fully autonomous car -- one without a steering wheel, brake pedal or accelerator pedal -- in its first commercial ride-sharing fleet in 2019, executives said. For passengers who cannot open doors, the Cruise AV -- a rebranded version of GM's Chevrolet Bolt EV -- has even been designed to perform that task. It will have other accommodations for hearing and visually impaired customers. This will be one of the first self-driving vehicles in commercial passenger service and among the first to do away with manual controls for steering, brakes and throttle. What is the driver's seat in the Bolt EV will become the front left passenger seat in the Cruise AV, GM said.


Ford lays out grand vision for a self-driving car future

USATODAY

Jennifer Jolly's coolest gadgets from CES you'll actually see in your home this year. Ford CEO James Hackett smiles while getting ready for an interview next to a self-driving delivery vehicle at CES International (Photo: Jae C. Hong, AP) LAS VEGAS -- Ford CEO Jim Hackett offered an ambitious vision for the automaker's self-driving vehicle business strategy Tuesday, depicting a future that will be as much as about networks of cars and traffic signals as any particular models. Ford will build these networked systems, he said, as well as the vehicles on the streets of this "City of Tomorrow." "The car and the system will be talking to each other," Hackett said at the CES tech trade show going on here. "The car obviously is going to learn to drive itself, but the city's transportation grid will mutate around what the cars need."


Your Future Smart Car Could Use AI To Help You Drive

TIME

At this year's CES, chipmaker Nvidia is showcasing new technology that could enable automakers to develop AI virtual assistants that are far smarter than the in-car versions of Alexa and Siri we're used to interacting with today. Nvidia announced two new software platforms for self-driving cars during a press conference on Sunday: Drive IX and Drive AR. The former allows carmakers to create artificially intelligent co-pilots that take advantage of sensors both inside and outside of the car to provide assistance. Volkswagen will be one of the first partners to begin experimenting with Drive IX in its I.D. Buzz prototype. Meanwhile, AI co-pilots built on Drive IX would be able to use facial recognition to identify the driver in order to accomplish tasks like starting the car or detecting whether or not the person behind the wheel is too drowsy to drive.