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Intel-Waymo-team-self-driving-car-computers.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

The chipmaker admitted it had worked with the company during the design of its compute platform to allow autonomous cars to process information in real time. The announcement marked the first time Waymo, formerly Google's autonomous program, has acknowledged a collaboration with a supplier. Intel began supplying chips for then-Google's autonomous program beginning in 2009, but that relationship grew into a deeper collaboration when Google began working with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCHA.MI) to develop and install the company's autonomous driving technology into the automaker's minivans. Intel began supplying chips for then-Google's autonomous program beginning in 2009.


NTSB Says Tesla Bears Some Blame for Deadly Autopilot Crash

WIRED

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the government's vehicle safety watchdog, concluded in January that because Brown was supposed to be monitoring the car's driving, human error--not Tesla tech--caused the crash. Tuesday morning, the National Transportation Safety Board, an independent federal body that investigates plane, train, and vehicle crashes, concluded its investigation into the incident. Systems like Tesla's Autopilot, General Motors' Super Cruise, and Audi's Traffic Jam Pilot already make driving safer, according to preliminary research. NHTSA's investigation of the Brown crash found that Tesla cars with self-driving capabilities crashed 40 percent less frequently than those without.


Trump camp updates U.S. self-driving car guidelines as more hit the road, paring safety assessment points

The Japan Times

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN – The Trump administration on Tuesday unveiled updated safety guidelines for self-driving cars aimed at clearing barriers for automakers and tech companies wanting to get test vehicles on the road. The guidelines also make clear that the federal government -- not states -- determines whether autonomous vehicles are safe. There is nothing to prohibit California, for instance, from requiring human backup drivers on highly automated vehicles, but the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration would discourage that. California, which is the only state that requires automakers to publicly report crashes of autonomous test vehicles, said Tuesday it was reviewing the new guidelines.


Driverless cars on public highways? Go for it, Trump administration says

Los Angeles Times

Under those guidelines, automakers and technology companies will be asked to voluntarily submit safety assessments to the U.S. Department of Transportation, but they don't have to do it. Last week, the House of Representatives passed a bill that eventually would let automakers each put as many as even if some features don't meet current safety standards set by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The new standards replace guidelines published by the Obama administration in September 2016 that asked automakers to voluntarily submit reports on a 15-point "safety assessment." The new "Vision for Safety" advises state officials to remain technology-neutral and not favor traditional automakers over technology companies; to remove regulatory barriers that keep driverless cars off the roads; and to make the federal Transportation Department's voluntary recommendations into law.


A 114-year old Mercedes has more in common with a Tesla than you think

Engadget

It was a trend-setting car for its time and while driving it was complicated (two brake pedals and a brake lever to bring it to a stop, plus you have to double clutch it to switch gears) it was hard not to think about how the world of the Simplex parallels the next big change in transportation: The switch to electric and autonomy. For over 114 years cars have been powered by the internal combustion engine (ICE). Like the first combustion engine automobiles, technology is ready to offer a new way to get around and it's finally a viable alternative to ICE vehicles. The company's goal of selling high-end, fast cars to the well off with a goal to sell an affordable EV to the masses not only put that automaker on the map, it helped jump start an entire revolution.


House passes bill to speed deployment of self-driving cars

Daily Mail

The House voted Wednesday to speed the introduction of self-driving cars by giving the federal government authority to exempt automakers from safety standards not applicable to the technology, and to permit deployment of up to 100,000 of the vehicles annually over the next several years. The House voted Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017, to speed the introduction of self-driving cars by giving the federal government authority to exempt automakers from safety standards not applicable to the technology, and to permit deployment of up to 100,000 of the vehicles annually over the next several years. The House bill is the product of extensive negotiations between Democrats and Republicans, a rare of example of bipartisan agreement in a Congress riven by political and ideological differences. The House bill is the product of extensive negotiations between Democrats and Republicans, a rare of example of bipartisan agreement in a Congress riven by political and ideological differences.


House passes bill to help self-driving cars hit the road sooner

Los Angeles Times

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to speed the introduction of self-driving cars by giving the federal government authority to exempt automakers from safety standards not applicable to the technology, and to permit deployment of up to 100,000 of the vehicles annually over the next several years. State and local officials have raised concern that it limits their ability to protect people's safety by giving the federal government sole authority to regulate the vehicles' design and performance. Generally, the federal government regulates the vehicle, while states regulate the driver. But consumer and safety groups say the bill could let the government exempt self-driving vehicles from occupant protection and crashworthiness standards as well.


Nissan's next Leaf is cheaper and can almost drive itself

Engadget

It's one of the best selling EVs ever and today the company introduced a redesigned $29,990 Leaf with ProPilot, a hands-on semi-autonomous feature for heavy traffic. Nissan unveiled the 2018 Leaf at events in Las Vegas and Tokyo with an aggressive new design for the four-door hatchback. "Competition makes everyone stronger and we welcome the competition," said Brian Maragno, Nissan EV marketing and sales strategy North America at the Las Vegas launch event. Nissan says with the feature enabled, the car will stop and stay put even on a hill.


House to vote on self-driving car legislation next week

#artificialintelligence

Republicans Representatives Greg Walden and Robert Latta said in a joint statement the "vote will pave the way for the safe testing, development, and deployment of self-driving cars across the U.S." The issue has taken on new urgency since U.S. road deaths rose 7.7 percent in 2015, the highest annual jump since 1966. Current federal rules bar self-driving cars without human controls on U.S. roads and automakers think proposed state rules in California are too restrictive. The measure, the first significant federal legislation aimed at speeding self-driving cars to market, would require automakers to submit safety assessment reports to regulators, but would not require pre-market approval of advanced vehicle technologies. Under the House proposal, states could still set rules on registration, licensing, liability, insurance and safety inspections, but could not set self-driving car performance standards.


Apple's next self-driving phase is an employee shuttle

Engadget

Apple famously planned to build an entire self-driving car, but abandoned that idea to focus on autonomous vehicle technology à la Uber and Waymo. It reportedly plans to test the tech by building a self-driving shuttle (called PAIL, for Palo Alto to Infinite Loop) that will take employees between its current campus and the new "Spaceship" HQ. We already know, thanks to many leaks and rumors, that Apple hired "hundreds" of engineers dedicated to building an entire autonomous car in a plan dubbed "Project Titan." As expected, Apple will use another company's vehicle to test its PAIL shuttle, much as Waymo has with Chrysler.