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How Mercedes Is Preparing For The 4th Industrial Revolution: Big Data, Machine Learning And Drones

@machinelearnbot

In an era of great uncertainty and disruption for automotive manufacturers, Mercedes and its parent company Daimler are jumping in full throttle as leaders of the 4th Industrial Revolution. Not only are they designing new vehicles, but their services, influence in the transportation industry and factories are transforming to embrace the new opportunities and demands of their customers. Other companies should follow their lead to thrive in the new industrial revolution. What is the 4th Industrial Revolution? Often referred to as industry 4.0, the 4th Industrial Revolution is the shift to smart factories that use a combination of cyber-physical systems, the Internet of Things and the Internet of Systems to connect the entire production chain and make decisions on its own.


Lyft raises $500m 'war chest' in battle with Uber

Daily Mail

Uber rival Lyft is raising an additional $500 million in funding ion its ongoinjg battle with Uber, according to a U.S. share authorization document filed in Delaware. The additional funding round, led by Alphabet's CapitalG, is an extension of the $1 billion round announced in October. The additional funding round, led by Alphabet's CapitalG, is an extension of a $1 billion round announced in October, and raises the firm's valuation to $11.5 billion Axios was first to report the news. In October Lyft had said that the previous round of funding boosted its valuation to $11 billion from $7.5 billion. The fresh funding would raise its valuation to $11.5 billion.


Tesla sending 'golden tickets' to Model 3 customers

Daily Mail

Elon Musk has frequently admitted to the'production hell' Tesla is going through in trying to make its hugely anticipated Model 3 car. But now, it appears the end may be in sight for the firm - and for owners who put down a $1,000 deposit for the revolutionary car. The firm has begun asking customers to specify exactly what they want in the car, promising those who choose a high end model will get it this year. The'golden ticket' email that allows users to finally specify exactly what features they want in their Model 3 The new ordering site explains that only the high end car with a long range battery, rear wheel drive and premium upgrades, costing $48,000 will be made first. It says the cheaper'base vehicle' will be following in spring next year.


Singapore will use driverless buses on roads from 2022

Daily Mail

Driverless buses will appear on some'quiet' roads in Singapore from 2022 as part of plans to improve mobility in the land-scarce city-state, its transport minister has announced. Singapore has so far avoided the massive traffic jams that choke other Asian cities like Manila and Jakarta by imposing road tolls, spending massively on public transport and becoming one of the world's most expensive places to own a car. It now plans to embrace self-driving technology to further reduce reliance on cars and improve how people get around. Driverless buses will appear on some roads in Singapore from 2022 as part of plans to improve mobility in the land-scarce city-state, its transport minister has announced. The buses will be deployed in three new suburban towns -Punggol, Tengah and the Jurong Innovation District.


Lyft now has permission to test self-driving cars on California's roads

Mashable

Lyft just took a small but essential step forward in the development of its own self-driving car project. The California DMV granted the rapidly growing ride-hailing company permission to test autonomous vehicles on the state's public roads. The registration, which the DMV gives after the submission of an application and an annual $150 fee, has become a rite of passage of sorts for the various AV projects from automakers, tech companies, and startups that are currently racing to develop their own platforms. Registering with the state means that Lyft will now have to submit certain information to the DMV about its operations, most significantly an annual disengagement report detailing the number of times human operators had to take control of test vehicles. Lyft joins the likes of massive companies like Volkswagen, Waymo, Apple, and Ford with the registration, rounding out the full list of testers to 45.


Lyft wins permit to test self-driving cars in California

Daily Mail

U.S. ride-hailing firm Lyft has secured a permit to test autonomous vehicles in California, taking it one step further in the race with several other companies to bring self-driving cars to the masses. Lyft's permit, reflected on the California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) website, comes two months after it announced plans to offer a self-driving car as a ride option in the San Francisco Bay Area. Lyft already has partnerships in place with autonomous car companies to advance its self-driving strategy. Ride-hailing firm Lyft Inc said on Monday it would launch its service in Toronto, marking the first international expansion for the U.S.-based rival of Uber Technologies Inc. Ford self-driving test vehicles will be connected to Lyft's network, but at first, customers will not be able to use them, according to Sherif Marakby, Ford's vice president for autonomous vehicles and electrification.


Apple reveals first details of its driverless car system

Daily Mail

While Apple hasn't hid its self-driving car ambitions, until now, little has been known about the mysterious project. But now, computer scientists at the firm have posted a paper online, shedding light on how the self-driving cars could work. The paper reveals that Apple's self-driving cars can better spot cyclists and pedestrians using laser sensors, in a new software approach called'VoxelNet.' While Apple hasn't hid its self-driving car ambitions, until now, little has been known about the mysterious project. Self-driving cars often use a combination of normal two-dimensional cameras and depth-sensing'LiDAR' units to recognize the world around them.


Budget 2017: Philip Hammond to spend hundreds of millions to make cars drive themselves

The Independent

The Government is to spend hundreds of millions of pounds encouraging people to make electric cars that drive themselves. It will spend huge amounts of money to try and incentivise electric vehicles. Then eventually those cars will start driving themselves around the country – with Chancellor Philip Hammond backing a plan to have them making their own way by 2021. Jeremy Corbyn used the news about driverless vehicles to joke about having tested "backseat driving" in the Government, which has been bitterly divided before the Budget. Mr Hammond said the technology was being introduced because the Government saw it as the future.


la-na-pol-self-driving-politics-20171121-story.html

Los Angeles Times

In its race to embrace driverless vehicles, Washington has cleared away regulatory hurdles for auto companies and brushed aside consumer warnings about the risk of crashes and hacking. But at a recent hearing, lawmakers absorbed an economic argument that illustrated how the driverless revolution they are encouraging could backfire politically, particularly in Trump country. It was the tale of a successful, long-distance beer run. A robotic truck coasted driverless 120 miles down Interstate 25 in Colorado on its way to deliver 51,744 cans of Budweiser. Not everyone at the hearing was impressed by the milestone, particularly the secretary-treasurer of the Teamsters, whose nearly 600,000 unionized drivers played no small roll in President Trump's victory last year.


Ray Massey says driverless car technology not yet ready

Daily Mail

The most dangerous part of any car, say the experts, 'is the nut behind the steering wheel'. Human error is to blame for most accidents, so remove that'nut' and let the car drive itself and many lives will be saved, runs the argument now pushed by ministers, manufacturers and supporters of what is known as'autonomous driving'. And it certainly seems as if it's full speed ahead for the driverless car. The Prime Minister Theresa May and Chancellor Philip Hammond yesterday confirmed plans -- widely trailed ahead of the Budget tomorrow -- to invest £900 million to deliver'fully driverless cars' by 2021. But is the Government right to be putting its foot on the accelerator?