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Artificial intelligence pioneer says we need to start over

#artificialintelligence

Fully autonomous cars are expected to dramatically increase driving safety when they eventually hit the roads, but it could cause new hazards for other road users. Researchers logged 150 hours of data over 1,800 miles and activated external signals on the car to gauge pedestrians' reactions. Standardization push: It would be a huge failure on the industry's part if different automakers come to market with different strategies for these types of signals, Shutko said. Ford and VTTI decided to explain the research after last month's media attention so that people wouldn't think the research project was "just a prank."


Why did Ford build a 'fake driverless car' using a man dressed as a seat?

The Guardian

Local news publication ARLnow caught the ghostly vehicle on camera and speculated that it was part of Virginia Tech's autonomous driving research. The "seat suit" stunt was the brainchild of Ford and Virginia Tech Transportation Institute research exploring how self-driving vehicles can communicate their intent to pedestrians, human drivers and cyclists. Ford and Virginia Tech wanted to test how people would react to light signals replacing some of this communication. "We needed to try out this new lighting to communicate the intent of the vehicle, but if you've got a driver behind the seat you still have natural communication between humans like eye-to-eye contact," said Andy Shaudt, who headed the research at Virginia Tech.


Ford admits role in CAR SEAT costume 'driverless' stunt

Daily Mail

Last month, a bizarre video showing a man disguised as a car seat while driving a silver van went viral, before it was revealed that the stunt was part of an autonomous car test. The test was designed to learn how hand waves and other informal language between pedestrians and drivers - and the lack thereof when cars go driverless - affects driving. It's been known the viral video showing a man disguised in a car seat costume controlling a silver van was part of a self-driving car test and not just a spoof, but it's now been revealed Ford was in on it In August, Virginia residents were shocked to see a car with no driver on the streets. Occupying 32 acres at the University's North Campus Research Complex, M City includes approximately five lane-miles of roads with intersections, traffic signs and signals, sidewalks, benches, simulated buildings, street lights and obstacles Occupying 32 acres at the University's North Campus Research Complex, it includes approximately five lane-miles of roads with intersections, traffic signs and signals, sidewalks, benches, simulated buildings, street lights, and obstacles such as construction barriers'At Ford, we believe developing self-driving vehicles is about more than just the technology itself, so we're working to design, test and advocate for a standard way for autonomous vehicles to easily communicate their intention to people on the streets and roads on which they will operate,' Shutko said.


Why Researchers Dressed as a Car Seat to Teach Self-Driving Vehicles to Talk

WIRED

Virginia Tech Transportation Institute took credit--nay, responsibility--for car seat man but wouldn't reveal more. Car seat man was part of a Ford-funded study by researchers at the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute into how autonomous vehicles will interact with humans on the road. It's hard to know, because when driverless cars test on public roads today, they're not really driverless. Now Ford and the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute have 150 hours and 1,800 miles of new data to determine how their autonomous vehicle language works in the real world.


House lawmakers just took the next step toward allowing more self-driving cars on U.S. roads

#artificialintelligence

A bill that would allow companies like Ford, Google and Uber to more easily test and deploy self-driving cars on U.S. roads inched ahead in Congress on Thursday, after House lawmakers voted to send it to the full chamber for consideration. In exchange, the Department of Transportation can exempt those autonomous vehicles from some federal safety requirements -- including, potentially, rules that require them to have steering wheels. To be sure, they'll have to adhere to some new federal regulations if the House committee's just-passed bill becomes law. Despite full House committee support on Thursday, it still has to come to the chamber floor for a vote.


Ford and Domino's announce self-driving delivery tests

Daily Mail

In the coming weeks, Domino's customers in Ann Arbor, Michigan, will be given the option to have a Ford Fusion Hybrid autonomous research vehicle deliver their pizza. In the coming weeks, Domino's customers in Ann Arbor, Michigan will be given the option to have a Ford Fusion Hybrid autonomous research vehicle deliver their pizza. Customers will be able to track the delivery process via the Domino's app and will receive text messages on how to retrieve their pizzas once the delivery has arrived. In the coming weeks, Domino's customers in Ann Arbor, Michigan, will be given the option to have a Ford Fusion Hybrid autonomous research vehicle deliver their pizza In a blog post last week, Sherif Marakby, head of Ford's autonomous and electric vehicles, hinted at the firm's broader ambitions.


Ford's 'Self-Driving' Pizza Delivery, BMW's Electric Mini, Uber Meltdowns, and More Car News From This Week

WIRED

Alex took us to the wilds of Seaside, California, where some cheeky car owners and tinkerers exhibited decidedly cruddy vehicles, their riposte to the ultra-fancy Concours d'Elegance held the same weekend in neighboring Pebble Beach. Witness, par exemple, an unremarkable 1976 Ford Pinto transformed by its owner's insistence on dressing up as a priest, chugging mimosas, and spewing terrible altar boy jokes. Alex took us to the wilds of Seaside, California, where some cheeky car owners and tinkerers exhibited decidedly cruddy vehicles, their riposte to the ultra-fancy Concours d'Elegance held the same weekend in neighboring Pebble Beach. Witness, par exemple, an unremarkable 1976 Ford Pinto transformed by its owner's insistence on dressing up as a priest, chugging mimosas, and spewing terrible altar boy jokes.


Ford and Domino's team up for self-driving pizza deliveries

Mashable

The companies announced today they're partnering to deploy driverless cars that will deliver pizzas to randomly selected customers. The vehicles used in the project are Ford Fusion Hybrid Autonomous Cars and will be equipped with a heated compartment accessible by the passenger side rear window. The cars will still have human drivers behind the wheel and will primarily be tasked with collecting a whole new stream of on-road data about the delivery process, according to Ford VP of Autonomous Vehicles and Electrification Sherif Marakby. The randomly selected customers will have to agree to be part of the trial before the delivery.


Domino's robot car delivers

FOX News

With the looming advent of the age of autonomous cars comes many questions. Foremost among them: Can they deliver pizza? That's what Domino's and Ford will try to find out in the coming weeks when they deploy a jointly-developed self-driving car into the streets of Ann Arbor, Mich., that's equipped with a heated compartment hidden behind the passenger side rear window that rolls down and dishes out orders when a customer enters an access code into a tablet installed on the side of the vehicle. Whether its people or pizza, the question remains: What do you give a robot for a tip?


Ford's vision for self-driving cars that pick up passengers and deliver packages

Mashable

"We're developing self-driving technology because the world is changing rapidly," Sherif Marakby, the company's vice president of autonomous vehicles and electrification, wrote in a Medium post Tuesday morning. Marakby further opened about Ford's plans to develop self-driving cars. "We plan to develop and manufacture self-driving vehicles at scale, deployed in cooperation with multiple partners, and with a customer experience based on human-centered design principles," he wrote. "Our team has decades of experience developing and manufacturing vehicles that serve commercial operations such as taxi and delivery businesses.