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Don't worry, driverless cars are learning from Grand Theft Auto

#artificialintelligence

In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix. The blockbuster video game is one of the simulation platforms researchers and engineers increasingly rely on to test and train the machines being primed to take control of the family sedan. Companies from Ford Motor Co. to Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo may boast about putting no-hands models on the market in three years, but there's a lot still to learn about drilling algorithms in how to respond when, say, a mattress falls off a truck on the freeway. If automakers and tech enterprises want to make their deadline, they have to hurry up.


Don't Worry, Driverless Cars Are Learning From Grand Theft Auto

#artificialintelligence

In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix. The blockbuster video game is one of the simulation platforms researchers and engineers increasingly rely on to test and train the machines being primed to take control of the family sedan. Companies from Ford Motor Co. to Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo may boast about putting no-hands models on the market in three years, but there's a lot still to learn about drilling algorithms in how to respond when, say, a mattress falls off a truck on the freeway. If automakers and tech enterprises want to make their deadline, they have to hurry up.


Self-Driving Vehicles: Apple More Interested In Apps Than Robotic Cars Themselves

International Business Times

If you had your heart set on an Apple iCar to go with your iPhone and Apple Watch, take a deep breath and prepare to be disappointed. Forbes reported Wednesday the company apparently is more interested in developing apps for self-driving cars than the cars themselves. The California Department of Motor Vehicles granted permits for Apple to test three 2015 Lexus RX 450h hybrid SUVs. Industry analysts say the fact that only three vehicles are involved suggests Apple is focusing on its CarPlay connectivity and infotainment platform, Forbes said. CarPlay already has a significant portion of the vehicle market.


Apple gets the green light to test self-driving cars in Calif.

USATODAY

A visitor presses the new Apple's CarPlay touch-screen commands inside the Volvo Estate concept car displayed at the Swedish carmaker during the press day of the Geneva Motor Show in Geneva on March 4, 2014. SAN FRANCISCO -- Much-discussed and sometimes despaired of, there's finally official word that Apple is working on a self-driving car, joining the dozens of other tech and auto companies approved to test autonomous vehicles in California. The Cupertino, Calif.-based tech giant has long been rumored to be working on its own autonomous car as part of an initiative called Project Titan, but has never officially confirmed its plans. Apple was so mum about the project that some thought it may have been shuttered, said Michelle Krebs, executive analyst for Autotrader. However, on Friday the company appeared on the state's Department of Motor Vehicle's list of approved applicants to test autonomous vehicles.


Meet the iCar? Apple to test self-driving vehicles in California

The Guardian

Apple is joining the fiercely competitive race to design self-driving cars, raising the possibility that a company that has already re-shaped culture with its iPhone may try to transform transportation, too. Ending years of speculation, Apple's late entry into a crowded field was made official Friday with the disclosure that the California department of motor vehicles had awarded a permit for the company to start testing its self-driving car technology on public roads in the state. The permit covers three vehicles – all 2015 Lexus RX 450h hybrid SUVs – and six individual drivers. California law requires people to be in a self-driving car who can take control if something goes wrong. Apple confirmed its arrival in the market, but wouldn't discuss its intentions.


Apple receives permit to test self-driving cars in California

Los Angeles Times

Tech giant Apple Inc. has received a permit from the Department of Motor Vehicles to test autonomous vehicles on public roads in California. The DMV said the Cupertino, Calif., company's permit, issued Friday, covers three Lexus RX540h vehicles from model year 2015, as well as six human drivers who will oversee the tests. Several months ago, reports suggested Apple was abandoning its plans for a car manufacturing business, as hundreds of members of the company's car team were let go, reassigned or left the project. Bloomberg reported in October that Apple was shifting its focus to developing an autonomous driving system, giving the company more flexibility either to work with other automakers or eventually return to building an actual vehicle. Apple did not respond immediately to a request for comment.



Uber is '5,000 times worse than Google's Waymo at self-driving cars'

The Guardian

According to driving statistics published by California, Uber is the worst of six major self-driving car companies testing its vehicles in the state. The minicab firm experienced a "disengagement" – when the automated system forces the human driver/passenger to take over control of the vehicle – once every mile driven, with a total of 20,354 miles clocked up before it was banned from testing in the state. By contrast, at the top of the table was Waymo, Google's sibling company, with one disengagement every 5,128 miles driven, and more than half a million miles driven in the last 12 months. The figures shed new light on the ongoing lawsuit between Waymo and Uber. The latter company is accused of stealing intellectual property after it acquired a self-driving truck company, Otto, which had been founded by Anthony Levandowski, a former Waymo employee.


Waymo's self-driving van heads to Tahoe for some time in the snow

#artificialintelligence

Waymo is working on one of the key areas it still needs to tackle ahead of any general public launch of its self-driving technology: snow. The company's vehicles still had a lot to learn in this specific realm as of late last year, and it's one of the most challenging road conditions any autonomous vehicle can face, because of the effects of deep cold and blanketing snow not only on traction and vehicle handling, but also on sensors and optics. Waymo CEO John Krafcik posted a tweet with an image of the Waymo Chrysler Pacifica minivan, kitted out with its in-house self-driving sensor technology, in a snowy setting at South Lake Tahoe in California. The Lake Tahoe location keeps Waymo within the domain of its license to test autonomous systems on state roads, but also provides snowy environs to test more extreme conditions and help it build out its flexibility in terms of weather conditions. Waymo's Pacifica vans began test drives on public roads in both California and Arizona in January.


Waymo's self-driving van heads to Tahoe for some time in the snow

#artificialintelligence

Waymo is working on one of the key areas it still needs to tackle ahead of any general public launch of its self-driving technology: snow. The company's vehicles still had a lot to learn in this specific realm as of late last year, and it's one of the most challenging road conditions any autonomous vehicle can face, because of the effects of deep cold and blanketing snow not only on traction and vehicle handling, but also on sensors and optics. Waymo CEO John Krafcik posted a tweet with an image of the Waymo Chrysler Pacifica minivan, kitted out with its in-house self-driving sensor technology, in a snowy setting at South Lake Tahoe in California. The Lake Tahoe location keeps Waymo within the domain of its license to test autonomous systems on state roads, but also provides snowy environs to test more extreme conditions and help it build out its flexibility in terms of weather conditions. Waymo's Pacifica vans began test drives in January, on public roads in both California and Arizona.