Results


Redefining 'Safety' For Self-Driving Cars

International Business Times

The event, in which no one was injured and no property was seriously damaged, attracted media and public attention in part because one of the vehicles was driving itself – and because that shuttle had been operating for only less than an hour before the crash. It's not the first collision involving a self-driving vehicle. Other crashes have involved Ubers in Arizona, a Tesla in "autopilot" mode in Florida and several others in California. But in nearly every case, it was human error, not the self-driving car, that caused the problem. In Las Vegas, the self-driving shuttle noticed a truck up ahead was backing up, and stopped and waited for it to get out of the shuttle's way.


la-na-pol-self-driving-politics-20171121-story.html

Los Angeles Times

In its race to embrace driverless vehicles, Washington has cleared away regulatory hurdles for auto companies and brushed aside consumer warnings about the risk of crashes and hacking. But at a recent hearing, lawmakers absorbed an economic argument that illustrated how the driverless revolution they are encouraging could backfire politically, particularly in Trump country. It was the tale of a successful, long-distance beer run. A robotic truck coasted driverless 120 miles down Interstate 25 in Colorado on its way to deliver 51,744 cans of Budweiser. Not everyone at the hearing was impressed by the milestone, particularly the secretary-treasurer of the Teamsters, whose nearly 600,000 unionized drivers played no small roll in President Trump's victory last year.


The 5 biggest questions we still have about the Tesla Semi

Mashable

Tesla finally unveiled its heavy-duty, all-electric Semi truck, and we're impressed. The big rig is the sum of all of the automaker's work in one massive package, featuring design cues from its other vehicles and even borrowing their parts, like the Model 3 motors that power each of its "super single" wheels. Musk claims the Semi will also offer truckers BAMF acceleration and performance specs, up to 500 miles of range per charge, and a cheaper cost to operate than standard diesel trucks. The Semi certainly looks the part of the next big thing for the trucking industry -- but there's still so much about it that we don't know. Elon Musk only showed off certain aspects of the truck during his presentation, leaving some very important features to be shared at a later date, when Tesla is ready to start churning out the rigs for clients.


Elon Musk Reveals Tesla's Electric Semitruck

WIRED

Elon Musk has always dreamed big, and tonight he showed off his biggest reverie yet: the fully electric Tesla Semi. Powered by a massive battery, it's capable of hauling 80,000 pounds. It'll even drive itself--on the highway, at least. The big rig, which Musk unveiled at Tesla's design center in Hawthorne, California Thursday night, is just the latest step in his mission to make humanity forget about planet-killing fossil fuels and embrace the gospel of electric power. That is, of course, if he can convince the trucking industry it's time for a new way of moving stuff around--and if he can actually make the thing.


Here are all the companies besides Tesla that are building trucks of the future

Mashable

Tesla will reveal its semi-truck design tonight in a highly anticipated event in Hawthorne, California, reaching another goal in founder Elon Musk's "Master Plan" for the company. The semi is the automaker's first shot at disrupting the trucking industry in the same way it brought all-electric cars to the forefront of the consumer auto conversation -- but Tesla won't be alone in its attempt to bring electric, autonomous big rigs to the world's highways. There are multiple next-gen trucking projects in the works from all manner of players, from fledgling startups with one killer concept to major conglomerates launching new brands. Some of the ventures focus on creating all-electric powertrains for heavy-duty vehicles, while others add self-driving features and new fleet logistics systems to standard rigs -- but they all want to shake up the trucking industry. SEE ALSO: Elon Musk rips the press for'ridiculous' coverage of Tesla firings Before Musk takes the stage at 8 p.m. Pacific on Thursday (or jumps on top of his new rig or whatever he winds up doing), lets take a look at a few of the other most exciting trucks in development that could change the way we haul cargo.


Hoverbikes-robotic-trucks-tested-British-Army.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

This futuristic footage shows driverless 4x4s being directed by unseen British soldiers using games console-style controllers in a world first. The Ministry of Defence yesterday announced it has worked with the US to trial an improved method of transporting food, fuel and ammunition to the front line. Over the course of a week, 'hoverbikes' and robotic trucks were tested in Michigan for the first time ever. It is hoped that remote control of vehicles will limit risks to soldiers by making'autonomous resupply' the norm. Footage from an exercise three years in the making shows a robotic convoy of trucks race across the vast landscape led by the six-tonne British Army MAN SV.


Tesla Semi Truck vs. Daimler eCanter: Electric Vehicles Compared

International Business Times

Tesla is expected to finally unveil its semi truck on Nov. 16. The vehicle will be Tesla's first venture into commercial trucks, and is also being considered a test for the electric vehicle technology. Commercial deployment of large batteries needed to support such trucks will mark a paradigm shift for fuel guzzling vehicles with large carbon footprints. It will also make way for autonomous electric vehicles. While Tesla is bringing its range of technology to the trucking segment, it also has competitors in waiting.


If you own a Ford pickup truck, it probably just got recalled

Mashable

Ford has issued a recall of approximately 1.3 million of its vehicles. SEE ALSO: A futurist and innovations expert explains what is and isn't real about AI in movies Ford announced today that the recalled models lack a shield to protect their side doors' latches from water. This is a problem because water can severely damage a door's latch or actuation cable, the cable that facilitates the opening and closing of the door. If a cable or latch is damaged by water or freezes, it can stop the door from being able to open or close. It could also make your car door unable to fully close, putting it at risk of flying open while you're driving.


NVIDIA unveils platform for fully autonomous cars

Daily Mail

The Pegasus line will be available by the middle of 2018 for automakers to begin developing vehicles and testing software algorithms needed to control future driverless cars, NVIDIA executives told a developers' conference in Munich on Tuesday. The deal between Deutsche Post, ZF and NVIDIA will include future Deutsche Post StreetScooter delivery trucks. In Munich, the three partners are showcasing a prototype StreetScooter running NVIDIA Drive PX chips used to control sensors including six cameras, one radar and one lidar, or 3D laser camera. De Ambroggi said NVIDIA's Pegasus automotive platform was the first with the processing power for automakers to begin developing truly autonomous vehicles, which could be upgraded with software improvements ahead of actual roadway deployments.


End of the road: will automation put an end to the American trucker?

The Guardian

Google, Uber, Tesla and the major truck manufacturers are looking to a future in which people like Baxter will be replaced – or at the very least downgraded to co-pilots – by automated vehicles that will save billions but will cost millions of jobs. The family-run Iowa 80 has been serving truckers for 53 years, and is so confident about its future that it is expanding to secure its claim to being the world's biggest truck stop, adding more restaurants and shopping space to the "Disneyland of truckers". In July, the powerful Teamsters union successfully pushed Congress to slow legislation for states looking to broaden the use of autonomous vehicles. But the automation that seems to most concern drivers at Iowa 80 concerns their log books.