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Smart Trucks Have Already Arrived

#artificialintelligence

The three technologies driving these changes are vehicle connectivity, artificial intelligence, and autonomous operating systems. The transmission will use that information, combined with data from GPS systems, mapping systems, internal route memorization, lateral controls and other systems, to shift smoothly, optimize fuel economy and keep a driver fully alert at all times. Ten years ago, truck and engine makers were adding a brand-new electronic control module to trucks to help manage exhaust aftertreatment systems required by new federal emissions regulations, says Jason Krajewski, manager of DTNA's connected vehicle insight team. "Since then, sensors and ECMs have been added regularly, with three or four new powerful number crunchers added in the past couple of years to handle data from new mapping systems and capacity for cameras, radar and active vehicle safety systems.


Driverless trucks are coming -- but for now, adoption is in the slow lane

ZDNet

"Driving long-haul trucks all day long, spending days and weeks away from family, is not for all, Rajkumar said. Autonomous trucks differ from autonomous cars in a number of ways, in terms of design. Once a long safety record that exceeds that of human drivers is established, "one can imagine that flammable cargo vehicles can also become fully autonomous," Rajkumar said. "There will come a time a few decades from now that fully autonomous gas trucks are deemed to be safer and more reliable."


Elon Musk: Tesla electric lorry to be unveiled in late October

The Guardian

The commercial trucking industry appears interested in Musk's proposed battery-powered heavy-duty vehicle, which can compete with conventional diesels and travel up to 1,000 miles on a single tank of fuel. Tesla's plans for new electric vehicles, including a commercial truck called the Tesla Semi, were announced last year, and in April Musk said the release of the semi-truck was set for September. In August, leaked correspondence with vehicle regulators revealed Tesla's plan to test long-haul, electric lorries that move in so-called platoons, or road-trains, that automatically follow a lead vehicle driven by a human. The Department for Transport announced last month that platoons of self-driving lorries will be trialled on England's motorways.


Tesla Semi Truck To Be Revealed On Oct. 26: 5 Expected Features

International Business Times

Musk called the upcoming vehicle a'beast' and'unreal,' so the upcoming vehicle is expected to compete with large rigs. Tesla has accommodated its battery in place of the regular engine in its cars, but the frame of a truck and its engine are designed differently and Tesla's design is expected to be interesting. But to compete with traditional long haul trucks, the Tesla Semi trucks will need to boost this range to 1,000 miles as regular long haul trucks have a range of 600-900 miles at least. But that brings up a quagmire -- the company will need a larger battery to provide the truck with an extended range, but if the battery is too big, it could actually interfere with the truck's weight carrying capacity.


Long in the works, self-driving boats may make a splash before autonomous cars

The Japan Times

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston start-up Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The start-up has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial containership," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving ships could be ready in three years

Los Angeles Times

Spurred in part by the auto industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The startup has signed a deal with an undisclosed company to install the "world's first autonomy system on a commercial container ship," Johnson said this week. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


Self-driving boats: The next tech transportation race

Boston Herald

Spurred in part by the car industry's race to build driverless vehicles, marine innovators are building automated ferry boats for Amsterdam canals, cargo ships that can steer themselves through Norwegian fjords and remote-controlled ships to carry containers across the Atlantic and Pacific. "We're in full autonomy now," said Jeff Gawrys, a marine technician for Boston startup Sea Machines Robotics, sitting at the helm as the boat floated through a harbor channel. The ocean is "a wide open space," said Sea Machines CEO Michael Johnson. In Norway, fertilizer company Yara International is working with engineering firm Kongsberg Maritime on a project to replace big-rig trucks with an electric-powered ship connecting three nearby ports.


la-fi-hy-tesla-autopilot-20170912-story.html

Los Angeles Times

"The Tesla's automation did not detect, nor was it required [to], nor was it designed to detect the crossing vehicle," Robert L. Sumwalt, chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board, said at the start of a hearing reviewing the Florida crash. Tests by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration determined that Tesla and other vehicles with semiautonomous driving technology had great difficulty sensing cross traffic. The NTSB staff also said that Tesla's reliance on sensing a driver's hands on the wheel was not an effective way of monitoring whether the driver was paying attention. The NTSB staff recommended the use of a more effective technology to determine whether a driver is paying attention, such as a camera tracking the driver's eyes.


NTSB: Tesla Autopilot 'limitations played a major role' in deadly crash

USATODAY

The National Transportation Safety Board says the car company is not at fault. National Transportation Safety Board chair Robert Sumwalt said the Tesla vehicle's "operational limitations played a major role in this collision." His statement came at the beginning of a hearing where the NTSB is expected to rule on whether the Autopilot system on Ohio resident Joshua Brown's Tesla Model S should be blamed for the Florida crash that killed him. Joshua Brown didn't keep his hands on the wheel, despite repeated vehicle warnings, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.


This Lumbering Self-Driving Truck Is Designed to Get Hit

WIRED

Such cars remain years away, of course, but you can find an autonomous vehicle saving lives on the road right now, in Colorado. It's an autonomous impact protection vehicle, which you probably know as one of those weird trucks with a big orange or yellow bumper on the back. Today, the Colorado Department of Transportation is deploying an autonomous impact protection vehicle to shake down technology that could eliminate one of the riskiest jobs on the road. Nationwide, there's a work zone crash every five minutes, according to the Federal Highway Administration--resulting in 70 injuries every day.