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NVIDIAVoice: AI Is Enabling Our Need For Speed And Safety In Racecar Driving

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The racing industry is on the fast track to driverless racecars, thanks to AI. At the center of this evolution is Roborace, the world's first autonomous racing competition. Conceived by renowned car designer Daniel Simon -- a former Bugatti designer who's gone on to create various cars for Hollywood -- the "Robocar" is designed, developed, and built by the Roborace organization. Teams compete by writing the software and developing deep neural networks that consume the sensor data to see, think, and act. The cars -- which are 4.8-meters-long -- can reach speeds of over 300 kilometers per hour.


Three Impacts Of Artificial Intelligence On Society

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Over the next five years, we are about to witness the world we live in entirely disrupted by improvements in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Children today are growing up with AI assistants in their homes (Google Assistant, Siri and Alexa) -- to the point that you might consider their mere presence an extension of co-parenting. As voice and facial recognition continue to evolve, machine learning algorithms are getting smarter. More and more industries are being influenced by AI, and our society as we know it is transforming. The transportation industry looks like it will be the first to be completely disrupted by artificial intelligence.


Three Impacts Of Artificial Intelligence On Society

Forbes Technology

Over the next five years, we are about to witness the world we live in entirely disrupted by improvements in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Children today are growing up with AI assistants in their homes (Google Assistant, Siri and Alexa) -- to the point that you might consider their mere presence an extension of co-parenting. As voice and facial recognition continue to evolve, machine learning algorithms are getting smarter. More and more industries are being influenced by AI, and our society as we know it is transforming. The transportation industry looks like it will be the first to be completely disrupted by artificial intelligence.


Security: Using AI for Evil

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is positively impacting our world in previously unimaginable ways across many different industries. The use of AI is particularly interesting in the cybersecurity industry because of its unique ability to scale and prevent previously unseen, aka zero-day, attacks. But remember, similar to how drug cartels built their own submarines and cellphone towers to evade law enforcement, and the Joker arose to fight Batman, so too will cyber-criminals build their own AI systems to carry out malicious counter-attacks. An August 2017 survey commissioned by Cylance discovered that 62% of cybersecurity experts believe weaponized AI attacks will start occurring in 2018. AI has been heavily discussed in the industry over the past few years, but most people do not realize that AI is not just one thing, but that it is made up of many different subfields.


Your guide to artificial intelligence in April 2018, by nathan.ai

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Grab your beverage of choice and enjoy the read! Do hit reply if you're up for a brainstorming session on use cases, new research or ways to future proof your SaaS or enterprise product by implementing ML where it makes sense. On the current "AI revolution": In a lovely piece, Prof. Michael Jordan of Berkeley explores many of the central tenets driving the excitement around AI today. He makes the case for a new engineering discipline, defines the differences between human-imitative AI (i.e. "The current focus on doing AI research via the gathering of data, the deployment of "deep learning" infrastructure, and the demonstration of systems that mimic certain narrowly-defined human skills -- with little in the way of emerging explanatory principles -- tends to deflect attention from major open problems in classical AI. These problems include the need to bring meaning and reasoning into systems that perform natural language processing, the need to infer and represent causality, the need to develop computationally-tractable representations of uncertainty and the need to develop systems that formulate and pursue long-term goals. These are classical goals in human-imitative AI, but in the current hubbub over the "AI revolution," it is easy to forget that they are not yet solved."


Self-Driving Cars and the Agony of Knowing What Matters

WIRED

In medicine, false positives are expensive, scary, and even painful. Yes, the doctor eventually tells you that the follow-up biopsy after that bloop on the mammogram puts you in the clear. But the intervening weeks are excruciating. A false negative is no better: "Go home, you're fine, those headaches are nothing to worry about." The problem with avoiding both false positives and negatives, though, is that the more you do to get away from one, the closer you get to the other.


How artificial intelligence is transforming the world

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Most people are not very familiar with the concept of artificial intelligence (AI). As an illustration, when 1,500 senior business leaders in the United States in 2017 were asked about AI, only 17 percent said they were familiar with it.1 A number of them were not sure what it was or how it would affect their particular companies. They understood there was considerable potential for altering business processes, but were not clear how AI could be deployed within their own organizations. Despite its widespread lack of familiarity, AI is a technology that is transforming every walk of life. It is a wide-ranging tool that enables people to rethink how we integrate information, analyze data, and use the resulting insights to improve decisionmaking. Our hope through this comprehensive overview is to explain AI to an audience of policymakers, opinion leaders, and interested observers, and demonstrate how AI already is altering the world and raising important questions for society, the economy, and governance. In this paper, we discuss novel applications in finance, national security, health care, criminal justice, transportation, and smart cities, and address issues such as data access problems, algorithmic bias, AI ethics and transparency, and legal liability for AI decisions. We contrast the regulatory approaches of the U.S. and European Union, and close by making a number of recommendations for getting the most out of AI while still protecting important human values.2 Although there is no uniformly agreed upon definition, AI generally is thought to refer to "machines that respond to stimulation consistent with traditional responses from humans, given the human capacity for contemplation, judgment and intention."3 According to researchers Shubhendu and Vijay, these software systems "make decisions which normally require [a] human level of expertise" and help people anticipate problems or deal with issues as they come up.4 As such, they operate in an intentional, intelligent, and adaptive manner. Artificial intelligence algorithms are designed to make decisions, often using real-time data. They are unlike passive machines that are capable only of mechanical or predetermined responses. Using sensors, digital data, or remote inputs, they combine information from a variety of different sources, analyze the material instantly, and act on the insights derived from those data. With massive improvements in storage systems, processing speeds, and analytic techniques, they are capable of tremendous sophistication in analysis and decisionmaking.



How artificial intelligence is projected to influence the automotive industry - IoT Now - How to run an IoT enabled business

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Artificial intelligence and data science are two main technologies that forms the processes of the automotive. Since 2017, Udacity selected a group of 18 talented engineers (out of hundreds of applicants) to form the Self-Racing Cars team Udacity offer the first self-driving Nanodegree program. The program was Built in partnership with Uber, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, and Nvidia. After a huge success, Udacity introduced another Nanodegree program for the beginners. At last, MIT and university introduced their courses in the automotive industry, says Joseph Zulick of MRO Electric and Supply.


The paradox on robocar accidents

Robohub

I have written a few times about the unusual nature of robocar accidents. Recently I was discussing this with a former student who is doing some research on the area.