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Can a smartphone be used to land on the moon? – a short history of artificial intelligence – first eCRM for eCommerce

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Artificial intelligence is not fiction. It is already our reality and has been for a very long time. Its origins date back to the 1950s. How has it changed since then? Are computers able to teach themselves?


Karnataka bets big on Artificial Intelligence, Big Data

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At a time when technologies like Artificial Intelligence are becoming the new world order, Karnataka is betting big to prepare itself for these new drivers of employment. Drones that monitor crop health, medical devices for early detection of cancer and apps that help visually impaired read and identify objects were some of the AI--based innovations on display at the Bengaluru Tech Summit 2017. Many of these companies pitched their products and services to an audience of top business executives, government officials, and investors at Karnataka government's flagship event held in Palace Grounds here. "We are at the beginning of what is called as fourth industrial revolution," said Kris Gopalakrishnan, co-founder of software giant Infosys. He said multinational companies are setting up research and development facilities here because they are able to find professionals at a scale who understand technologies such as AI and Machine Learning.


It's About to Get Way, Way Easier to Put AI Everywhere

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Google has a vision for a world full of cheap and tiny smart devices--and it hopes its software will power them all. A couple of years back, Google launched an open-source machine-learning software library called TensorFlow. It has since exploded in popularity, to the point where it's now used by the likes of Airbnb, eBay, Uber, Snapchat, and Dropbox to power their AI development. Its appeal is obvious: it allows relative beginners to build and train neural networks without needing a PhD in artificial intelligence. As a result, the library now forms a major component of Google's business plan.


Australian 4G coverage in global top 10: OpenSignal

ZDNet

Telstra has the highest average 4G speeds while Optus has the best 4G latency and Vodafone Australia the highest 4G availability, according to telecommunications coverage mapping company OpenSignal's latest report. The overall average download speed for each telco was 30.88Mbps for Telstra, 29.44Mbps for Vodafone, and 24.85Mbps for Optus. On speeds, OpenSignal pointed towards Telstra aggregating five 4G channels, Optus aggregating between two and four, and Vodafone doing the same though over less spectrum. Telstra and Optus also use 4x4 Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (4x4 MIMO) and 256 Quadrature Amplitude Moderation (256 QAM), the report said, meaning speeds will climb even higher across Australia once more consumers begin using compatible devices. On the percentage of time that each telco's customers had 4G available to them, Vodafone ranked highest, at 85.88 percent, followed by Optus at 85.43 percent and Telstra at 85.07 percent -- although it should be noted that Telstra has a higher number of regional and rural customers where 4G may not be available.


Apple's first ever 'gaming robot' is a mechanical spider

Daily Mail

Apple is selling its first ever'gaming robot' that can carry out augmented reality warfare and is controlled by a smartphone. The fearsome-looking mechanical spider is called MekaMon and relies on four infrared sensors to measure distance, location and wage attacks on its opponent. This fighter, which launches today on the Apple store for £300 ($300), simultaneously has bot-on-bot brawls in real life and on the screen. The robot is used to play a game is set in 2076 following an alien invasion on Earth. Humans are using their MekaMon robots to fight back and recapture their territory.


Making artificial intelligence more private and portable

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The technology is a form of deep-learning artificial intelligence software developed to fit onto mobile computer chips. This allows artificial intelligence to be used in a range of devices, from smartphones to industrial robots. This portability would enable devices to operate independent of the Internet while using artificial intelligence that performs equivalent to tethered neural networks. With this, a hosting chip embedded in a smartphone could run a speech-activated virtual assistant and undertake other intelligent features, such as controlling data usage. Other applications include operating drones and surveillance cameras in remote areas.


How Digital Is Transforming Child Healthcare - CXOtoday.com

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Just imagine a day in your life, where you would no longer have to wait for weeks to visit your paediatrician, followed by an additional wait for your child's health test results and then still more waiting to get an accurate child health record. We are all aware that the constantly altering demographic drifts in child healthcare, the escalating child population and a steeping rise in various chronic illnesses that children these days are suffering from, have nothing but created an enormous demand for health care and social care services for children. Given the superiority of the 21st-century technology, the major question that arises is how can we modify the child health care system to better cope with the rising healthcare needs? The solution to this concern is nothing but efficiently digitalizing child health care to bring in more innovation. Electronic child healthcare is something that needs to be given immediate attention.


Hackers develop a simple £115 MASK that can fool Face ID

Daily Mail

It's one of the most wanted features in the iPhone X, but it seems that Face ID may not be as safe as Apple thinks. Cyber-security researchers claim they have fooled the face recognition technology with a mask that costs just £114 ($150) to make. The findings suggest that face recognition is not yet mature enough to guarantee security for computers and smartphones, according to the researchers. The main frame of the face was created with a 3D printer, and the nose was created by an artist from silicone. The eyes were represented with 2D images, while the'skin was also hand-made to trick Apple's AI', according to the researchers.


Victorian Human Services uses 'platform plus agile' approach for new applications

ZDNet

A "platform-plus-agile" approach has enabled the Victorian Department of Human Services (DHS) to deliver more than 30 business systems at a speed never thought possible in a government setting, said Steve Hodgkinson, CIO at the Victorian Department of Health & Human Services. At Microsoft's Creating a Digital Difference Summit, Hodgkinson said the agile methodology cannot be applied alone in government because "you hit a brick wall as soon as something is proven to be good", whether it's around procurement, security, or integration with legacy environments. The platform-plus-agile approach is about starting with the production platform, then building a "minimum visible product" on top of it, he explained, which is followed by iterative improvements. "You don't have to build all the basic technology. You don't have to go out and do unnecessary procurement.


Tech Tent: Autonomous cars and AI doctors

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Was this the week that the space age vision of a car that drives itself became a reality? And are claims that artificial intelligence can transform healthcare a bit overhyped? On this week's Tech Tent podcast we explore the potential and limits of technology in health and transport. This week we woke up to the fact that autonomous cars could be with us sooner than we thought. That was the message from John Krafcik, chief executive of Waymo, the self-driving car division of Google - or Alphabet as we must learn to call it.