sensor


Handheld scanner divines how nutritious your food really is

New Scientist

FARMERS can now zap their crops with a handheld scanner to instantly determine nutritional content, which could prove crucial in mitigating the effects of climate change on food quality. "Real-time results mean farmers can add fertilisers or tweak moisture levels as crops grow" Farmers can use the app to assess the impact of changing conditions, such as extreme weather and soil quality, on the quality of their crops from year to year. It could allow farmers to mitigate the negative effects of climate change early by adding fertilisers or tweaking moisture levels as crops grow. Other companies are developing similar gadgets for consumers, and sensors that can be fitted onto a smartphone.


The top 20 industrial IoT applications

@machinelearnbot

The term "industrial Internet of Things" has a more muted-sounding promise of driving operational efficiencies through automation, connectivity and analytics. The company has integrated sensors to tools and machines on the shop floor and given workers wearable technology -- including industrial smart glasses -- designed to reduce errors and bolster safety in the workplace. Gehring uses the same cloud-based real-time tracking to reduce downtime and optimize its own manufacturing productivity through monitoring its connected manufacturing systems, visualizing and analyzing data from its machine tools in the cloud. While it offers an IoT platform known as Lumada, Hitachi also makes a plethora of products leveraging connected technology, including trains, which the company is beginning to sell as a service.


Facial Recognition Is Only the Beginning: Here's What to Expect Next in Biometrics on Your Phone

MIT Technology Review

Apple says its version of the technology, called Face ID and available when the phone ships in November, uses a suite of sensors to map your face in 3-D. An infrared light illuminates your face, and a projector projects an array of infrared dots at it. Anil Jain, a Michigan State University professor who studies biometric recognition and computer vision, notes that it uses an existing tactic called structured light to capture your visage in three dimensions--something he employed for object recognition back in the 1980s. Beyond the work the company has done to keep the wrong people out of the phone, Apple claims that Face ID will let the right person in even in the dark, while wearing glasses or a hat, and after growing a beard. Jain says it's conceivable that smartphones will eventually include sensors for face, iris, and fingerprint recognition--a rarity now.


Can artificial intelligence and IoT feed the planet's growing population?

#artificialintelligence

The innovation behind these transformations is machine learning, a kind of algorithm that ingests and analyzes tons of data to find common patterns, and turn those patterns into predictions and actions. The practice, known as "precision farming," uses real-time and historical data along with machine learning algorithms to take specific actions for smaller areas and time increments instead of performing the same thing for a very large area in a routine-based manner. Deep learning and computer vision algorithms analyze the collected data to learn and report when something important is happening. These tasks can be as easy as controlling irrigation on different parts of the field based on humidity data obtained from sensors, or notifying distribution partners based on the amount and time of yield expected.


Google's Waymo Using Intel Chips For Its Self-Driving Minivans

@machinelearnbot

Waymo--the Google self-driving project that spun out to become a business under Alphabet--said Monday it's using Intel chips as part of a compute platform that allows its self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans to process huge amounts of data so it can make decisions in real time while navigating city streets. "As the most advanced vehicles on the road today, our self-driving cars require the highest-performance computers to make safe driving decisions in real time," Waymo CEO John Krafcik said in an emailed statement. However, it wasn't until Waymo started the Chrysler Pacifica minivan project that it began working more closely with the chipmaker. "By working closely with Waymo, Intel can offer Waymo's fleet of vehicles the advanced processing power required for level 4 and 5 autonomy."


Waymo and Intel Combine to Power the Future of Self-Driving Cars

WIRED

For months now, major companies have been hooking up--Uber and Daimler, Lyft and General Motors, Microsoft and Volvo--but Intel CEO Brian Krzanich's announcement on Monday that the giant chipmaker is helping Waymo, Google's self-driving car project, build robocar technology registers as some seriously juicy gossip. Krzanich said Monday that Waymo's newest self-driving Chrysler Pacificas, delivered last December, use Intel technology to process what's going on around them and make safe decisions in real time. And last year, Google announced it had created its own specialized chip that could help AVs recognize common driving situations and react efficiently and safely. "Our self-driving cars require the highest-performance compute to make safe driving decisions in real-time," Waymo CEO John Krafcik said in a statement.


Can artificial intelligence and IoT feed the planet's growing population?

#artificialintelligence

The innovation behind these transformations is machine learning, a kind of algorithm that ingests and analyzes tons of data to find common patterns, and turn those patterns into predictions and actions. The practice, known as "precision farming," uses real-time and historical data along with machine learning algorithms to take specific actions for smaller areas and time increments instead of performing the same thing for a very large area in a routine-based manner. Deep learning and computer vision algorithms analyze the collected data to learn and report when something important is happening. These tasks can be as easy as controlling irrigation on different parts of the field based on humidity data obtained from sensors, or notifying distribution partners based on the amount and time of yield expected.


Top 5 Digital Transformation Trends In Manufacturing

#artificialintelligence

Today, these advanced algorithms are transforming the way the manufacturing industry collects information, performs skilled labor, and predicts consumer behavior. Smart factories with integrated IT systems provide relevant data to both sides of the supply chain more easily, increasing production capacity by 20%. Robots and other automated technology are also integral in improving speed and efficiency, allowing manufacturing companies to "optimize production workflows, inventory, Work in Progress, and value chain decisions." With this new level of predictive accuracy comes an improvement in condition monitoring processes, providing manufacturers "with the scale to manage Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the plant level increasing OEE performance from 65% to 85%."


AI: the new driving force in the automotive industry

#artificialintelligence

Following the completion of the UK's largest collaborative trial of autonomous cars, which started in 2015, UK Autodrive has now been given the green light to start testing the driverless technology in public spaces around Milton Keynes and Coventry. Google's Waymo has now progressed to the point where it's cut the number of human interventions needed for its driverless cars by more than half and plans to start testing a minivan version this year. It's a community-generated navigation platform that allows drivers to add traffic congestion alerts and see them in real time. Beyond potential app integration, passenger data has even more promise.


Intel, Waymo partner to work on fully autonomous cars

ZDNet

Waymo's latest vehicles, self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans, feature Intel-based technologies for sensor processing, general compute and connectivity. Intel said last month that the computer vision subsidiary is working on a fleet of level 4 autonomous vehicles that should be deployed sometime later this year. The aim is to deliver a complete "car-to-cloud" system by coupling Intel's high-performance computing expertise with Mobileye's computer vision, sensor fusion, mapping, machine learning, and artificial intelligence. Meanwhile, in its own blog post, Waymo noted that it worked with Intel from the design stage of its latest vehicle to integrate Intel technology into its platform.