self-driving car


Religion that worships artificial intelligence prepares for a world run by machines

#artificialintelligence

A newly established religion called Way of the Future will worship artificial intelligence, focusing on "the realization, acceptance, and worship of a Godhead based on Artificial Intelligence" that followers believe will eventually surpass human control over Earth. The first AI-based church was founded by Anthony Levandowski, the Silicon Valley multimillionaire who championed the robotics team for Uber's self-driving program and Waymo, the self-driving car company owned by Google. Way of the Future "is about creating a peaceful and respectful transition of who is in charge of the planet from people to people'machines,'" the religion's official website reads. "Given that technology will'relatively soon' be able to surpass human abilities, we want to help educate people about this exciting future and prepare a smooth transition." Levandowski filed documents to establish the religion back in May, making himself the "Dean" of the church and the CEO of a related nonprofit that would run it.


'Connected' cars are hitting UK roads for the first time

Engadget

Slowly, the UK government is realising its dream of making the nation a self-driving research hub. UK Autodrive, a publicly funded consortium that includes Jaguar Land Rover, Ford and TATA Motors, has announced a new set of trials in Coventry today. They will focus on self-driving cars and vehicles that can instantly share information with other motorists and city infrastructure. Researchers will be testing a signal, for instance, that can be sent out by the emergency services -- ambulances, fire trucks and police cars -- to nearby drivers, advising them when and where to move aside. Other test features include a warning signal for intersections deemed too unsafe to cross, in-car information about accidents and traffic jams (negating the need for signs on bridges) and an alert system when a driver in front suddenly hits the brakes (the idea being that this can be hard to spot in rain and fog).


How will the cloud be able to handle the emergence of IoT

@machinelearnbot

Cloud computing and the Internet of Things (IoT) have spent the last several years in a sort of maximum-acceleration race where they've lapped the other players several times over and have only one another to measure against. Neither is slowing down, particularly the IoT. According to analysis firm Gartner, the number of IoT devices will hit 20.8 billion by 2020. The world population is expected to reach 8 billion in 2020, meaning there will be 2.5 IoT devices per person on the entire planet. In 2016, the IoT was growing at the rate of 5.5 million new things getting connected every day.


California may limit liability of self-driving carmakers

Daily Mail

California regulators are embracing a General Motors recommendation that would help makers of self-driving cars avoid paying for accidents and other trouble, raising concerns that the proposal will put an unfair burden on vehicle owners. If adopted, the regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications. That could open a loophole for automakers to skirt responsibility for accidents, injuries and deaths caused by defective autonomous vehicles, said Armand Feliciano, vice president for the Association of California Insurance Companies. The regulations drafted by the California DMV would protect carmakers from lawsuits in cases where their self driving vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications. The regulations drafted by the California Department of Motor Vehicles would protect these carmakers from lawsuits in cases where vehicles haven't been maintained according to manufacturer specifications.


Traveling back in time could be possible says physicist

Daily Mail

As the common tropes of science fiction continue to break out into reality, from humanoid robots to self-driving cars, there's one concept that has seemingly remained beyond our grasp: time travel. But, jumping through time might not be impossible, after all, according to one astrophysicist. By the rules of theoretical physics, certain conditions exist that would allow for the construction of elaborate wormholes, which could transport humans back to different eras. A wormhole could be constructed in a way that allows one end to remain nearly motionless, while the other moves at almost the speed of light. This could theoretically allow humans to travel through time.


Ex-Google engineer who founded AI church 'raising a god'

Daily Mail

An ex-Google engineer who has registered the first church of AI says he is'raising a god' that will that charge of humans. The robot god will head a religion called Way Of The Future (WOTF), which will eventually have a gospel called'The Manual', rituals and even a physical place of worship, Anthony Levandowski first filed papers with the Internal Revenue Service inMay, and named himself as'dean' of WOTF, giving him complete control until his death or resignation. Levandowski his robot god will take charge of its human subjects as we relinquish our power to a creation with far more intelligence than our own. Anthony Levandowski (right) who has registered the first church of AI says he is'raising a god' that will treat humans as esteemed elders. He is pictured with Uber founder and ex-CEO Travis Kalanick.


Why Self-Driving Cars Might Not Lead to a Huge Drop In Fuel Consumption

TIME

Automated cars–once a far-off dream–have in recent years left the realm of science fiction and leapt closer to the American garage. Leading U.S. automakers say that bona fide self-driving cars are coming within two decades and they're fighting to stay competitive, from Ford's $1 billion investment in an artificial-intelligence company earlier this year to Uber's 2016 purchase of self-driving truck company Otto. These advances promise relief to drivers sick of two-hour commutes and bumper-to-bumper traffic, but they leave open questions for a society shaped for the past century around the automobile. Perhaps no area is more quantifiably uncertain than the environmental impact of automated vehicles. One report from the Department of Energy found that automated vehicles could reduce fuel consumption for passenger cars by as much as 90%, or increase it by more than 200%.


Teaching Morality to Machines

#artificialintelligence

Jane Zavalishina is the CEO of Yandex Data Factory. Vyacheslav Polonski is a PhD student at the University of Oxford and the CEO of Avantgarde Analytics. For years, experts have warned against the unanticipated effects of general artificial intelligence (AI) on society. Ray Kurzweil predicts that by 2029 intelligent machines will be able to outsmart human beings. Stephen Hawking argues that "once humans develop full AI, it will take off on its own and redesign itself at an ever-increasing rate."


There's a new religion centered around artificial intelligence and it sounds terrifying

Mashable

There's a new church for tech-minded folks, and it sounds like something out of a science fiction novel. "Way of the Future" (or WOTF, as they abbreviate it) is Yes, you read that correctly. They want to get a head start on selling out the human race to our machine-overlords-to-be. The church (for lack of a better word) assumes that technology will eventually surpass human capabilities, and turn into an all-knowing, all-seeing being that will resemble--or arguably actually be--a god. And that we need to know who's on the computers' side by keeping track (more on that later).


Will Self-Driving Cars Kill The Radio?

Huffington Post

With the imminent rise of self-driving cars' popularity, Nikhil Reddy discusses the possibility that traditional radio could be left in the dust.