professor


The future of getting dressed: AI, VR and smart fabrics

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Cher Horowitz's closet from the film "Clueless" had a futuristic computer system that helped her put together outfits. Back in 1995, the concept teased what it might be like to get dressed in the future. Technology has evolved a lot since then, but closets have been largely untouched by innovation. Now, that's starting to change. "If algorithms do their job well, people will spend less time thinking about what to wear," said Ranjitha Kumar, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.


Can Artificial Intelligence Really Identify Suicidal Thoughts? Experts Aren't Convinced

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Australian experts have spoken out about a recent US study that claimed to show artificial intelligence can identify people with suicidal thoughts - by analysing their brain scans. It sounds promising - but it's worth pointing out only 79 people were studied, so are the results enough to show this is a path worth pursing? The research, published in Nature, studied brain activity in subjects when presented with a number of different words - like death, cruelty, trouble, carefree, good and praise. A machine-learning algorithm was then trained to see the nureal response differences between the two groups involved - those with suicidal thoughts, and those with non-suicidal thoughts. And it showed promise - the algorithm correctly identified 15 of 17 patients as belonging to the suicide group, and 16 of 17 healthy individuals as belonging to the control group.


Can Artificial Intelligence Really Identify Suicidal Thoughts? Experts Aren't Convinced

#artificialintelligence

Australian experts have spoken out about a recent US study that claimed to show artificial intelligence can identify people with suicidal thoughts - by analysing their brain scans. It sounds promising - but it's worth pointing out only 79 people were studied, so are the results enough to show this is a path worth pursing? The research, published in Nature, studied brain activity in subjects when presented with a number of different words - like death, cruelty, trouble, carefree, good and praise. A machine-learning algorithm was then trained to see the nureal response differences between the two groups involved - those with suicidal thoughts, and those with non-suicidal thoughts. And it showed promise - the algorithm correctly identified 15 of 17 patients as belonging to the suicide group, and 16 of 17 healthy individuals as belonging to the control group.


ANDROIDS through the eye of a 19th century wooden camera

Robohub

Wanda Tuerlinckx and Erwin R. Boer have fused their scientific and photographic interests in robots and traveled the world since 2016 to visit roboticists to discuss and photograph their creations. The resulting set of photographs documents the technical robot revolution that is unfolding before us. The portfolio of photographs below presents the androids from Wanda's collection of robot photographs. But first, here's a note from Erwin R. Boer, a scientist who connects humans and machines using symbiosis facilitating techniques mirrored after the way humans interact with each other in the here and now. Man has created machines in the form of mechanical humans since antiquity.


When algorithms discriminate: Robotics, AI and ethics

Al Jazeera

We live in an age of rapid technological advances where artificial intelligence (AI) is a reality, not a science fiction fantasy. Every day we rely on algorithms to communicate, do our banking online, book a holiday - even introduce us to potential partners. Driverless cars and robots may be the headline makers, but AI is being used for everything from diagnosing illnesses to helping police predict crime hot spots. As machines become more advanced, how does society keep pace when deciding the ethics and regulations governing technology? Al Jazeera talks to Stephen Roberts, professor of Machine Learning at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, on the role machine learning plays in our lives today - and in the future.


Algorithm better at diagnosing pneumonia than radiologists

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Stanford researchers have developed an algorithm that offers diagnoses based off chest X-ray images. A paper about the algorithm, called CheXNet, was published Nov. 14 on the open-access, scientific preprint website arXiv. "Interpreting X-ray images to diagnose pathologies like pneumonia is very challenging, and we know that there's a lot of variability in the diagnoses radiologists arrive at," said Pranav Rajpurkar, a graduate student in the Machine Learning Group at Stanford and co-lead author of the paper. "We became interested in developing machine learning algorithms that could learn from hundreds of thousands of chest X-ray diagnoses and make accurate diagnoses." The work uses a public data set initially released by the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center on Sept. 26.


Super computer programmed to think like the Zodiac killer

Daily Mail

A supercomputer programmed to think like the notorious Zodiac killer could help solve one of the most difficult cases in US law enforcement history. A new artificial intelligence software designed to understand human language may be able to decipher secret messages left by the notorious serial killer who has evaded justice for decades. The computer was commanded to think like the Zodiac and produced some creepy poetry when fed all the known writings of the elusive criminal, it was learned Thursday. A University of Southern California professor created an artificial intelligence software that was designed to help crack the code of the Z340, the Zodiac killer's famous cipher. The ciphers, which were sent with letters to the police and newspapers in Northern California during the 1960s and 70s, contain letters and symbols that may hide clues as to the killer's identity.


tomorrows-naked-lawyer

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ISBN: 978-1-78358-174-0 (Ark Group, 2014) Author Chrissie Lightfoot – named in the 2015 list of the'World's Top Female Futurists' & LinkedIn as the No.1 best-connected & most engaged woman in the legal industry, 4th in all sectors, 2015. "It's here at last! Four long years of waiting are over. Its innovative style, approach and language went where no-one else had quite been before." Wait'til you get a load of Tomorrow's Naked Lawyer! Tomorrow's Naked Lawyer takes off from where The Naked Lawyer left you.


ODSC East 2018 Open Data Science Conference

@machinelearnbot

Be one of the first to hear about announcements and ticket discounts. ODSC West 2017 is one of the largest applied data science conferences in the world. Our speakers include some of the core contributors to many open source tools, libraries, and languages. Attend ODSC West 2017 and learn the latest AI & data science topics, tools, and languages from some of the best and brightest minds in the field. See schedule for many more..


Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach (3rd Edition): Stuart Russell, Peter Norvig: 8601419506989: Amazon.com: Books

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Stuart Russell was born in 1962 in Portsmouth, England. He received his B.A. with first-class honours in physics from Oxford University in 1982, and his Ph.D. in computer science from Stanford in 1986. He then joined the faculty of the University of California at Berkeley, where he is a professor of computer science, director of the Center for Intelligent Systems, and holder of the Smith–Zadeh Chair in Engineering. In 1990, he received the Presidential Young Investigator Award of the National Science Foundation, and in 1995 he was cowinner of the Computers and Thought Award. He was a 1996 Miller Professor of the University of California and was appointed to a Chancellor's Professorship in 2000.