Transportation


The Future of Mobility, Fuelled by Artificial Intelligence and Distributed Ledger Technology

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What opportunities exist for AI and Distributed Ledger Technology in Mobility and how can emerging companies capture the short and long term value? The digital transformation in the Automotive Industry is creating more data than ever before. According to a study conducted by McKinsey, research on car-data-monetization suggests that this value pool could be as large as $750 billion by 2030. According to the study, the opportunity for auto manufacturers hinges on their ability to 1) quickly build and test automotive data-driven products and services and 2) develop new business models built on technological innovation, advanced capabilities, and partnerships that push the boundaries of the automotive industry. Given these two goals, auto manufacturers will be creating a myriad of opportunities for technology developers, startups, insurance providers, data management servers and many more stakeholders.


How Artificial Intelligence Is Projected To Influence The Automotive Industry

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So, if AI have existed since 1950 why it is matter to Automotive industry now? there are two answers for this question. A more detailed answer which reflect all these technologies together. The huge advance in machine learning algorithms due to the deep learning; moreover, With AI as an raising common technology platform, the automotive industry is set to test various changes in the following years. As several issues considered during the manufacturing process in terms of AI: vehicles become more integrated, and complex systems. New functions are added according to standards.


Automakers must decide how much uncertainty is acceptable for autonomous vehicles

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To meet the goal of autonomous vehicles that can operate safely and without any need for human input -- that is, L5 automation -- automakers must train AI systems to navigate myriad conditions they'll run into in the real world so that they don't actually run into anything in the real world). Our highways and roads are, as we all know from experience behind the wheel, wholly unpredictable places, and they'll continually require self-driving cars to instantly interpret and react to "edge case" scenarios. While machine learning can guide AI to develop a recognition of, and reaction to, scenarios that it has seen many times before, there's an immense hurdle in training AI for one-in-a-million (or billion) situations. For example, AI may be well-versed in basic freeway driving, or identifying pedestrians under expected circumstances. Freeways may be littered with everything from tire scraps to sofas to grandmothers chasing after ducks; Halloween costumes can make pedestrians difficult to detect; you can set traps for autonomous vehicles; and even electric scooters can prove problematic for AVs.


NSW to spend AU$10m on driverless car trials

ZDNet

The New South Wales government has announced the establishment of a AU$10 million fund to progress trials of driverless vehicles. The initiative, part of the state's 2018-19 Budget to be handed down on Tuesday, is expected to allow governments, universities, the private sector, and startups to work together to develop and test driverless technologies throughout the state. "The future belongs to those who hear it coming, and this investment looks to harness the power of technology to improve lives across the state," Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said in a statement on Monday. Transport Minister Andrew Constance said the technology will "change the playing field" and provide new opportunities for personalised transport services. "The technology is here and we are going to make sure we are ready to embrace it," he said.


Driverless Tech Will Impact These 5 Industries

International Business Times

Self-driving vehicles are one of the most anticipated and exciting innovations in the world today. Driverless cars seemed like a sci-fi fantasy only a decade ago but they are fast becoming a reality as companies like auto manufacturers, ridesharing services, and tech companies race to develop a safe and reliable autonomous vehicle (AV). This article originally appeared in the Motley Fool. If the autonomous vehicle revolution lives up to the expectations of futurists and forecasters, its effects will be far-reaching. Not only will everyday commuting and transportation be transformed due to the rise of "mobility as a service" -- as the driverless revolution has been called -- but a wide range of industries will also be changed for better or worse as they adapt to a world where people can easily move from one destination to another in computerized pods. Just as the cloud has led to the transition of computing as a scalable service rather than a concrete product like hardware, analysts see a similar evolution with self-driving cars.


Forces of change: The future of mobility

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The entire way people and goods travel from point A to point B is changing, driven by a series of converging technological and social trends: the rapid growth of carsharing and ridesharing; the increasing viability of electric and alternative powertrains; new, lightweight materials; and the growth of connected and, ultimately, autonomous vehicles. The result is the emergence of a new ecosystem of mobility that could offer faster, cheaper, cleaner, safer, more efficient, and more customized travel. While uncertainty abounds, in particular about the speed of the transition, a fundamental shift is driving a move away from personally owned, driver-driven vehicles and toward a future mobility system centered around (but not exclusively composed of) driverless vehicles and shared mobility. The shift will likely affect far more than automakers--industries from insurance and health care to energy and media should reconsider how they create value in this emerging environment. We believe a series of technological and social forces, including the emergence of connected, electric, and autonomous vehicles and shifting attitudes toward mobility, are likely to profoundly change the way people and goods move about.


Honda Gets Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution By Using AI, Big Data And Robots

Forbes Technology

Although the Japanese company Honda is widely known as one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world and also the largest manufacturer of motorcycles, it is increasingly on the front edge of technological innovation outside the automotive world. The company's investment in research and development landed it on the "Top 20 R&D Spenders" list that includes five other automakers but representatives from other industries as well. Based upon the innovations Honda has shared publicly, it's using some of this R&D budget to get ready for the 4th industrial revolution by using AI and big data to not only design safer and more personalized autos, but also create robots. With the tremendous amount of data that's created from a wide variety of sources including sensors on cars, customer surveys, smartphones and social media, Honda's research and development team uses data analytics tools to comb through data sets in order to gain insights it can incorporate into future auto designs. As the company's big data maturity has increased, its engineers are learning to work with and leverage data, that had previously been to cumbersome to find meaning, thanks to the assistance of big data technology and analytics tools.


Honda Gets Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution By Using AI, Big Data And Robots

#artificialintelligence

Although the Japanese company Honda is widely known as one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world and also the largest manufacturer of motorcycles, it is increasingly on the front edge of technological innovation outside the automotive world. The company's investment in research and development landed it on the "Top 20 R&D Spenders" list that includes five other automakers but representatives from other industries as well. Based upon the innovations Honda has shared publicly, it's using some of this R&D budget to get ready for the 4th industrial revolution by using AI and big data to not only design safer and more personalized autos, but also create robots. With the tremendous amount of data that's created from a wide variety of sources including sensors on cars, customer surveys, smartphones and social media, Honda's research and development team uses data analytics tools to comb through data sets in order to gain insights it can incorporate into future auto designs. As the company's big data maturity has increased, its engineers are learning to work with and leverage data, that had previously been to cumbersome to find meaning, thanks to the assistance of big data technology and analytics tools.


Highway to The Future: Artificial Intelligence for Smart Vehicles

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John Ludwig is an electrical engineer and the president of Xevo's Artificial Intelligence (AI) Group. Xevo is a tier-one OEM software company, located in Seattle, that manages automotive software for driver assistance, engagement, and in-vehicle entertainment. Its main product is the Xevo Market, a merchant-to-driver commerce platform that uses a vehicle's infotainment screen to make purchases and transations from inside the car. Xevo Market launched at the end of 2017 and is already available in millions of vehicles. Prior to working with Xevo, Ludwig was a software manager with Microsoft, overseeing operating systems and online service projects.


Connected Vehicles at the Cross-Roads: what is needed for success?

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At the Geneva International Motor Show yesterday, next to the exhibition halls showing off car manufacturers' latest creations, industry experts and UN representatives gathered to discuss how they will fast-forward the automotive industry -- and the world -- into the future. The Symposium on the Future Networked Car (FNC-2018), convened by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), revealed how the automotive industry has been leveraging recent advances in information and communication technologies (ICT) to make transport systems safer, greener, and more intelligent. Participants highlighted the opportunities to be seized and challenges to be overcome for success. Curtis Hay, Technical Fellow at General Motors, described the recently launched Cadillac Super Cruise, which provides a hands-free driving experience. "We need more standards, and the worldwide use of harmonized standards.