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How Tesla, Nest And Medtronic Are Using IoT-Derived Data To Move Their Businesses Forward

Forbes Technology

Technology-enabled growth can come from many sources, but it's rarely technology alone that spurs progress forward. In the case of the Internet of Things (IoT), the "things" are important, but it is the combination of their interconnectivity and the data they generate that delivers value. Early adopters of IoT are not leading just because they're implementing these technologies first; they're leading because of how they're embracing IoT. We spoke with Tesla, Nest and Medtronic to learn how they are leveraging IoT-derived data to move their businesses forward in ways that were not possible just a few years ago. Early adopters of IoT are not leading just because they're implementing these technologies first; but because of how they're embracing IoT.


Driverless Tech Will Impact These 5 Industries

International Business Times

Self-driving vehicles are one of the most anticipated and exciting innovations in the world today. Driverless cars seemed like a sci-fi fantasy only a decade ago but they are fast becoming a reality as companies like auto manufacturers, ridesharing services, and tech companies race to develop a safe and reliable autonomous vehicle (AV). This article originally appeared in the Motley Fool. If the autonomous vehicle revolution lives up to the expectations of futurists and forecasters, its effects will be far-reaching. Not only will everyday commuting and transportation be transformed due to the rise of "mobility as a service" -- as the driverless revolution has been called -- but a wide range of industries will also be changed for better or worse as they adapt to a world where people can easily move from one destination to another in computerized pods. Just as the cloud has led to the transition of computing as a scalable service rather than a concrete product like hardware, analysts see a similar evolution with self-driving cars.


Forces of change: The future of mobility

#artificialintelligence

The entire way people and goods travel from point A to point B is changing, driven by a series of converging technological and social trends: the rapid growth of carsharing and ridesharing; the increasing viability of electric and alternative powertrains; new, lightweight materials; and the growth of connected and, ultimately, autonomous vehicles. The result is the emergence of a new ecosystem of mobility that could offer faster, cheaper, cleaner, safer, more efficient, and more customized travel. While uncertainty abounds, in particular about the speed of the transition, a fundamental shift is driving a move away from personally owned, driver-driven vehicles and toward a future mobility system centered around (but not exclusively composed of) driverless vehicles and shared mobility. The shift will likely affect far more than automakers--industries from insurance and health care to energy and media should reconsider how they create value in this emerging environment. We believe a series of technological and social forces, including the emergence of connected, electric, and autonomous vehicles and shifting attitudes toward mobility, are likely to profoundly change the way people and goods move about.


Honda Gets Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution By Using AI, Big Data And Robots

Forbes Technology

Although the Japanese company Honda is widely known as one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world and also the largest manufacturer of motorcycles, it is increasingly on the front edge of technological innovation outside the automotive world. The company's investment in research and development landed it on the "Top 20 R&D Spenders" list that includes five other automakers but representatives from other industries as well. Based upon the innovations Honda has shared publicly, it's using some of this R&D budget to get ready for the 4th industrial revolution by using AI and big data to not only design safer and more personalized autos, but also create robots. With the tremendous amount of data that's created from a wide variety of sources including sensors on cars, customer surveys, smartphones and social media, Honda's research and development team uses data analytics tools to comb through data sets in order to gain insights it can incorporate into future auto designs. As the company's big data maturity has increased, its engineers are learning to work with and leverage data, that had previously been to cumbersome to find meaning, thanks to the assistance of big data technology and analytics tools.


Honda Gets Ready For The 4th Industrial Revolution By Using AI, Big Data And Robots

#artificialintelligence

Although the Japanese company Honda is widely known as one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world and also the largest manufacturer of motorcycles, it is increasingly on the front edge of technological innovation outside the automotive world. The company's investment in research and development landed it on the "Top 20 R&D Spenders" list that includes five other automakers but representatives from other industries as well. Based upon the innovations Honda has shared publicly, it's using some of this R&D budget to get ready for the 4th industrial revolution by using AI and big data to not only design safer and more personalized autos, but also create robots. With the tremendous amount of data that's created from a wide variety of sources including sensors on cars, customer surveys, smartphones and social media, Honda's research and development team uses data analytics tools to comb through data sets in order to gain insights it can incorporate into future auto designs. As the company's big data maturity has increased, its engineers are learning to work with and leverage data, that had previously been to cumbersome to find meaning, thanks to the assistance of big data technology and analytics tools.


The Road Ahead for Autonomous Cars and Auto Insurance

#artificialintelligence

The death of a pedestrian who was struck by an autonomous vehicle in Tempe, Arizona, has brought fresh scrutiny to the accelerating development of self-driving cars. The accident on March 18 is bound to be studied exhaustively, both to determine fault and to assess and refine the overall safety of autonomous systems. According to accounts of the accident, the vehicle, outfitted to test Uber's autonomous driving system, struck a woman at night as she pushed her bicycle across a road outside of a designated crosswalk. Video of the crash, released by Tempe police, shows a woman emerging from a darkened area seconds before she was struck; in the same span of time, the safety driver looks down multiple times for reasons that aren't clear. Uber pledged its full cooperation in the unfolding investigation but has already reached a settlement with some of the victim's family members, while others have come forward, according to multiple news reports.


Connected Vehicles at the Cross-Roads: what is needed for success?

#artificialintelligence

At the Geneva International Motor Show yesterday, next to the exhibition halls showing off car manufacturers' latest creations, industry experts and UN representatives gathered to discuss how they will fast-forward the automotive industry -- and the world -- into the future. The Symposium on the Future Networked Car (FNC-2018), convened by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), revealed how the automotive industry has been leveraging recent advances in information and communication technologies (ICT) to make transport systems safer, greener, and more intelligent. Participants highlighted the opportunities to be seized and challenges to be overcome for success. Curtis Hay, Technical Fellow at General Motors, described the recently launched Cadillac Super Cruise, which provides a hands-free driving experience. "We need more standards, and the worldwide use of harmonized standards.


AI: the reality and the hype

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a pervasive technological force that's impacting individuals, business, and society. While another AI winter seems unlikely, thanks to advances in deep learning this decade, it's important to separate fact from fiction so that governments can regulate AI in a way that doesn't stifle its potential, play up to public fears, or create a climate of overhype. Edinburgh University's Professor of Epistemics Jon Oberlander gave us his thoughts on the current state of play of this game-changing technology. According to Prof. Oberlander, the answer to whether AI is overhyped is a "very firm yes and no," meaning that the tech is viable, but that tangent obstacles exist. He uses driverless vehicles as an example: "I think [they] are not quite as close as we might imagine…The reasons aren't technical, they're regulatory."


Commentary: Will driverless vehicles drive insurance premiums down?

#artificialintelligence

You are in a driverless private hire vehicle that's ferrying you to work. As the vehicle drives itself, you take a nap in the backseat. Suddenly, you are awakened by a loud thud and the sound of glass shattering. You come to your senses, and realise that the car has hit a pedestrian who is now lying motionless. All this happened while you were asleep, without any human input on how the vehicle manoeuvred or behaved.


Tesla and Autonomous Driving: What is Autopilot?

#artificialintelligence

Over the years, the vehicles we rely on each day have grown increasingly more impressive, thanks to safety-enhancing advances in cameras, GPS, and more. As automobile manufacturers continue to search for solutions that might make vehicles easier to drive, and less dangerous on the roads, there's been a huge surge in research around the concept of "autonomous" driving. Driverless cars are set to transform the world, changing the concept of "road trips" for good, and substantially reducing the risk of accidents. Some reports even suggest that autonomous technology could reduce collisions by 80% by 2040. One of the most compelling pieces of technology leading the way for autonomous driving is the Tesla Autopilot system – an AI-enhanced driving assistance feature that's set to change the way we drive.