Passenger


Driverless cars are more likely to HIT people with darker skin

Daily Mail

Facial recognition systems developed for self-driving cars are better at identifying the faces of white people than those of darker skin tones, a study has revealed. Researchers say the inherent racism of these systems likely stems from a lack of dark-skinned individuals included in the training of the tech. The study found databases behind facial recognition technology being built for autonomous cars are up to 12 per cent worse at spotting people with darker skin. On average, the technology is 4.8 per cent more accurate at correctly spotting light-skinned individuals. A system was used with skin tones ranging from one to six, with a higher number linked to darker skin.


Don't look now: why you should be worried about machines reading your emotions

The Guardian

Could a program detect potential terrorists by reading their facial expressions and behavior? This was the hypothesis put to the test by the US Transportation Security Administration (TSA) in 2003, as it began testing a new surveillance program called the Screening of Passengers by Observation Techniques program, or Spot for short. While developing the program, they consulted Paul Ekman, emeritus professor of psychology at the University of California, San Francisco. Decades earlier, Ekman had developed a method to identify minute facial expressions and map them on to corresponding emotions. This method was used to train "behavior detection officers" to scan faces for signs of deception.


Journalists reported a news story using machine learning

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In November, the news website Quartz unveiled a bold idea: a studio, funded by the Knight Foundation, dedicated to reporting the news using machine learning techniques. Today, the Quartz AI Studio's first story dropped -- and it's an intriguing peek at how advancements in artificial intelligence could provide journalists with new tools for digging into public documents. For the story, Quartz reporters trained an algorithm to examine the section of ride-hailing app Lyft's Initial Public Offering (IPO) that lists risks the company anticipates -- and to identify the most "distinctive," or unusual, things that rattle Lyft's executives. The resulting list of Lyft's unusual concerns range from the fairly obvious to the moderately surprising. In addition to having concerns about "public perception," the company's leaders are also worried about how healthcare privacy laws will affect customers who use its service to catch rides to medical appointments.


7 Israeli Firms On Fast Company's 'World's Most Innovative' Technology News

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Seven Israeli and Israeli-founded companies were among over 400 firms featured by US business magazine Fast Company on its annual "World's Most Innovative Companies" for 2019. The monthly publication's editors and writers said they sought out groundbreaking businesses across 35 industries in every world region, listing the top 10 in 41 categories such as AI, Biotech, Branding, Health, Robotics, Food, Security, and Middle East, for a total of 410 organizations. Fast Company also released its annual "50 Most Innovative Companies" but no Israeli firms made that list. In 2018, Israeli-founded navigational app Waze was featured in the top 50 alongside giants such as Apple, Amazon, Netflix, and Spotify, and Israel had its own category with 10 top startups. An additional 5 Israeli companies and startups were featured in other categories.


Narita to become first airport in Japan to use facial recognition for boarding instead of document checks

The Japan Times

Narita will be the first airport in the nation to adopt a system that does not require passengers to pause for identification when boarding, according to Narita International Airport Corp. The operator hopes that the system will improve convenience for passengers ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Summer Olympics and Paralympics. Passengers will first have photos taken of their faces at self check-in kiosks where they enter passport and boarding pass information. High-performance cameras set up at the baggage drop-off counters, safety inspection areas and boarding gates will track the passengers and check their identity against the registered photos as they make their way through the boarding process. While passports and boarding tickets will not be manually checked at such locations, passengers will still have to go through existing procedures at immigration control.


IBM's Watson can show you the fastest, easiest way to travel in cities

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Finding the best way to get around a busy city is no easy task. At MWC 2019, Seat and IBM announced Mobility Advisor, which uses Watson artificial intelligence (AI) to work out the best way to reach your destination – whether it's a train, ride-hailing service or an electric scooter. The tool's suggestions will take into account traffic reports, weather forecasts, and any events happening in the city that day, so you won't get caught in the rain riding a hire bike, or reach a train station at the same time as a crowd of sports fans. Mobility Advisor is currently in development, and is intended to run as a mobile app on 4G and 5G networks. Over time, it will learn your preferences and make personalized recommendations based on the way you like to travel.


Uber's flying taxi service pitched at government for trial in Australia

ZDNet

Uber wants to bring the trial of its flying taxi play down under, telling a House Infrastructure, Transport and Cities Committee on Thursday that it just needs Australian governments to work alongside the Silicon Valley darling to make that happen. Uber Air is touted by the company as an "urban aviation ride-sharing product", with Uber's Australia and New Zealand head of cities Natalie Malligan telling the committee the plan is for customers to be able to "push a button and get a flight", just like they currently do with an on-road vehicle. The company in August announced five possible markets to launch its pipedream: Australia, Brazil, France, India, and Japan. It also confirmed that from 2023, customers will be able to get a flight on-demand in Dallas and Los Angeles. But before launch, the company needs to trial the initiative, and learning from past mistakes in Australia, Uber is asking for government support before it starts offering flights.


How AI-Powered Chatbots Are Unlocking Business Value Today - DZone AI

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Since the term "AI" was first coined by cognitive scientist Richard McCarthy and his team in preparation for the 1956 Dartmouth AI Conference, machines that can demonstrate human-like intelligence have been the holy grail of the artificial intelligence field. AI has certainly endured some rough times; falling well short of the hype popularized by media in addition to the unrealistic expectations that were created and not met by the reality of AI's narrow capabilities. Along with the underestimation of AI project costs, this of all contributed to busts and disappointments in the field. Despite these past disappointments, the recent convergence of technology improvements in the fields of computing power, automation, hardware capabilities, cloud, big data, and advanced analytics have brought AI starkly back to the forefront of research and business today. AI is being hailed as the new electricity, primarily due to the transformative influence it will likely exert on all facets of our lives.


How AI-Powered Chatbots Are Unlocking Business Value Today - DZone AI

#artificialintelligence

Since the term "AI" was first coined by cognitive scientist Richard McCarthy and his team in preparation for the 1956 Dartmouth AI Conference, machines that can demonstrate human-like intelligence have been the holy grail of the artificial intelligence field. AI has certainly endured some rough times; falling well short of the hype popularized by media in addition to the unrealistic expectations that were created and not met by the reality of AI's narrow capabilities. Along with the underestimation of AI project costs, this of all contributed to busts and disappointments in the field. Despite these past disappointments, the recent convergence of technology improvements in the fields of computing power, automation, hardware capabilities, cloud, big data, and advanced analytics have brought AI starkly back to the forefront of research and business today. AI is being hailed as the new electricity, primarily due to the transformative influence it will likely exert on all facets of our lives.


How cognitive technologies might evolve in travel in 2019 PhocusWire

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The maturing of cognitive technologies is opening up opportunities in travel, according to a trends report from Deloitte. The report says the technology enables travel brands to change existing processes, streamline operations and create "smart workforces." Cognitive technology is within the field of artificial technology (including machine learning, natural language processing and speech recognition) and is able to carry out jobs that up until now have been done by humans. The Deloitte 2019 U.S. Travel and Hospitality Outlook says that the mix of operations carried out by and between people combined with the unpredictability of traveler preferences and travel patterns presents opportunities for cognitive technology in terms of insight, automation and engagement. The report points to airports as an example where cognitive insight can be employed to analyze data across various sources, help avoid delays and ultimately improve the passenger experience.