Intelligent to a Fault: When AI Screws Up, You Might Still Be to Blame


Artificial intelligence is already making significant inroads in taking over mundane, time-consuming tasks many humans would rather not do. The responsibilities and consequences of handing over work to AI vary greatly, though; some autonomous systems recommend music or movies; others recommend sentences in court. Even more advanced AI systems will increasingly control vehicles on crowded city streets, raising questions about safety--and about liability, when the inevitable accidents occur. But philosophical arguments over AI's existential threats to humanity are often far removed from the reality of actually building and using the technology in question. Deep learning, machine vision, natural language processing--despite all that has been written and discussed about these and other aspects of artificial intelligence, AI is still at a relatively early stage in its development.

Flipboard on Flipboard


Alex Bell likes to bike around New York City, but he got fed up with how often bike lanes were blocked by delivery trucks and idling cars. So he decided to do something about it, the New York Times reports. Bell is a computer scientist and he developed a machine learning algorithm that can study traffic camera footage and calculate how often bike and bus lanes are blocked by other vehicles. He trained the algorithm with around 2,000 images of different types of vehicles and for bus lanes, he set the system to be able to tell the difference between buses that are allowed to idle at bus stops and other vehicles that aren't. Then, he applied his algorithm to 10 days of publicly available video from a traffic camera in Harlem.

The paradox on robocar accidents


I have written a few times about the unusual nature of robocar accidents. Recently I was discussing this with a former student who is doing some research on the area.

NVIDIA And Artificial Intelligence: How NVDA Is Leading The Way


The era of artificial intelligence (AI) is officially here. The AI market is expected to grow from $21.46 billion in 2018 to $190.61 billion by 2025, at a CAGR of 36.62% between 2018 and 2025, according to a recent report. AI's phenomenal growth across different industries is being fueled by unprecedented computing power, ever-increasing amounts of data--billions of gigabytes every day--and sophisticated deep-learning algorithms. According to the AI Index report, the number of active U.S. startups developing AI systems has increased 14 times whereas the annual VC investment into such startups has increased only 6 times since 2000. Moreover, the share of jobs requiring AI skills in the U.S. has grown 4.5 times since 2013.

3 industries saving billions with cognitive machine learning


Natural human flaws can have severe impacts on business with lasting damage – 82% of operational asset failures are attributed to human performance. Indeed, a recent study by ARC Advisory Group found that the global process industry loses up to $20 billion a year due to unscheduled downtime – or $12,500 hourly, on average. However, machine learning is helping eliminate these costly flaws and is helping transform the manufacturing industry. This technology, along with others like big data analytics, are able to predict if and when something will break – cancelling the possibility of costly downtime. See also: Anticipating downtime will be business' next competitive advantage Seth Page is a cognitive computing veteran and industrial IoT pioneer based in Washington DC, and is CEO and co-founder of DataRPM, a Progress company.

Googlers are furious about their AI being used with military drones


Gizmodo reports that Google employees are enraged at the company after discovering that the AI they built is presently being used by the US Department of Defense (DoD) to analyze the massive troves of video footage captured by military drones. It's part of Project Maven, aka, Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team (AWCFT) (PDF), a Pentagon-driven project started last April to make use of big data and machine learning tech to advance the DoD's capabilities in the field. The idea has been to use Google's AI to identify vehicles and other objects in footage from drones; it was previously manually analyzed by humans, but these unmanned vehicles are now capturing more video than staff can keep up with, as the DoD is now racking up "millions of hours" of clips. It's understandable that employees at Google would be concerned and angry to learn that what they've built may be used to assist military activities they may not be aligned with. But the company has attempted to allay those fears with a statement.

Evolution of E-commerce: The possibilities of tomorrow


The rapid growth of e-commerce is driving deep changes in logistics, from tightening up trucking capacity to elevating the importance of final-mile delivery processes. To respond, logistics managers now need to think in terms of systems that they can leverage today to make processes more efficient, while also keeping an eye on longer-term developments that will reshape tomorrow's possibilities. Several of thee include solutions currently in use, such as predictive analytics, supply chain control towers, and the continued digitization of freight forwarding; however, many, including blockchain-based traceability, driverless trucks, and even the advent of hyperloops, are all working through development, but promise to present bright new options in the future. The new take, says Joe Vernon, senior manager of North America supply chain analytics for consulting firm Capgemini, is predictive analytics that make use of machine learning and other related technology, including artificial intelligence (AI). "The goal is take all this data and be instructive with it, which is where machine learning comes in.

Roborace is building a 300kph AI supercar – no driver required


The Argentinian summer Sun beat down on the Buenos Aires city circuit as the cars approached the penultimate turn. It was February 18, 2017, the Saturday of Formula E's South American weekend, and two cars jostled for first place. The second car, though, was being too aggressive. Nearing the corner's apex, the vehicle misjudged its position and speed. The vehicle slammed into the blue safety walls surrounding the track. As the wreckage crumpled to a stop, a detached wheel rolled freely across the hot asphalt.

A guide to AI image recognition


Artificial intelligence is becoming a centralised part of our everyday lives, even if we don't realise it. In fact, half of the people who encounter AI don't know they are doing so.

At least two cool ways that AI can help insurance companies


Machine learning could be used to underwrite faster, reduce fraud and assess vehicle damages more accurately, Lawrence Wong, Munich Re Canada's director of application development, said Tuesday.