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Life in the Fast Lane

AI Magazine

Giving robots the ability to operate in the real world has been, and continues to be, one of the most difficult tasks in AI research. Since 1987, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have been investigating one such task. Their research has been focused on using adaptive, vision-based systems to increase the driving performance of the Navlab line of on-road mobile robots. This research has led to the development of a neural network system that can learn to drive on many road types simply by watching a human teacher. This article describes the evolution of this system from a research project in machine learning to a robust driving system capable of executing tactical driving maneuvers such as lane changing and intersection navigation.


5 ways artificial intelligence is driving the automobile industry 7wData

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Now, let's look at the different ways in which artificial intelligence will drive the automobile industry in the future: Artificial intelligence is a kind of intelligence developed as a result of excellent scientific experiments. However, there is a difference between Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning. Toyota has gone a step further and has brought together Big data, Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence to create highly responsive autonomous systems that aid in mobility for those who are "less able to drive". DL techniques have been very useful in the automobile industry as it aids in advanced driving assistance systems and autonomous driving.


IEEE Xplore: IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems

AITopics Original Links

Accurate and timely traffic flow information is important for the successful deployment of intelligent transportation systems. Over the last few years, traffic data have been exploding, and we have truly entered the era of big data for transportation. Existing traffic flow prediction methods mainly use shallow traffic prediction models and are still unsatisfying for many real-world applications. In recent years, the range of sensing technologies has expanded rapidly, whereas sensor devices have become cheaper. This has led to a rapid expansion in condition monitoring of systems, structures, vehicles, and machinery using sensors.


The Moral Imperative of Artificial Intelligence

AITopics Original Links

The big news on March 12 of this year was of the Go-playing AI-system AlphaGo securing victory against 18-time world champion Lee Se-dol by winning the third straight game of a five-game match in Seoul, Korea. After Deep Blue's victory against chess world champion Gary Kasparov in 1997, the game of Go was the next grand challenge for game-playing artificial intelligence. Go has defied the brute-force methods in game-tree search that worked so successfully in chess. In 2012, Communications published a Research Highlight article by Sylvain Gelly et al. on computer Go, which reported that "Programs based on Monte-Carlo tree search now play at human-master levels and are beginning to challenge top professional players." AlphaGo combines tree-search techniques with search-space reduction techniques that use deep learning.


Global Bigdata Conference

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Over the past few years, the term "deep learning" has firmly worked its way into business language when the conversation is about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Big Data and analytics. And with good reason – it is an approach to AI which is showing great promise when it comes to developing the autonomous, self-teaching systems which are revolutionizing many industries. Deep Learning is used by Google in its voice and image recognition algorithms, by Netflix and Amazon to decide what you want to watch or buy next, and by researchers at MIT to predict the future. The ever-growing industry which has established itself to sell these tools is always keen to talk about how revolutionary this all is. But what exactly is it?


Flipboard on Flipboard

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What Is The Difference Between Deep Learning, Machine Learning and AI? Over the past few years, the term "deep learning" has firmly worked its way into business language when the conversation is about Artificial Intelligence (AI), Big Data and analytics. And with good reason – it is an approach to AI which is showing great promise when it comes to developing the autonomous, self-teaching systems which are revolutionizing many industries. Deep Learning is used by Google in its voice and image recognition algorithms, by Netflix and Amazon to decide what you want to watch or buy next, and by researchers at MIT to predict the future. The ever-growing industry which has established itself to sell these tools is always keen to talk about how revolutionary this all is.


How Uber Pre-Packages Machine Learning 'as a service' Across the Business

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Uber has a core team providing pre-packaged machine learning algorithms'as-a-service' to its team of mobile app developers, map experts and autonomous driving teams. Head of machine learning at Uber, Danny Lange has been busy bringing to Uber a similar structure to one he built during his time at infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) provider Amazon Web Services (AWS). There he managed their internal machine learning platform and helped launch Amazon Machine Learning for AWS. Speaking to Computerworld UK, Lange said: "We are going to make every part of our business smarter and provide better user experiences. I run the team that offers that as an infrastructure and we have three core areas: drivers and riders taking trips, improving maps for drivers and self driving vehicles."


How machine learning could be the key to an autonomous future

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One of the latest trends in the world of commercial vehicle design and engineering is'machine learning', a term that's used across the wider automotive world and is rapidly transforming the way in which certain vehicle systems are engineered and built. Vehicle manufacturers are keen to get hold of people with machine learning experience and bring them on board for the betterment of future products. It's also being touted as fundamental to the development of driverless vehicles. But what is machine learning? Essentially, it's a type of computerised artificial intelligence (AI) that allows the interpretation of large amounts of data, on a scale far in advance of anything humans could do.


The Moral Imperative of Artificial Intelligence

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Some labor economists have viewed Polanyi's Paradox as a major barrier for AI, arguing it implies a limit on its potential to automate human jobs. Indeed, the automation of driving has been a major challenge for AI research over the past decade. Thus, the automation of driving would be hugely beneficial, saving lives and preventing injuries on a massive scale. In the balance, life saving and injury prevention must take precedence, and we have a moral imperative to develop and deploy automated driving.


Machine learning is making self-driving cars smarter, but it can also make their workings more mysterious

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Two recent accidents involving Tesla's Autopilot system may raise questions about how computer systems based on learning should be validated and investigated when something goes wrong. But machine learning techniques are increasingly used to train automotive systems, especially to recognize visual information. For example, a deep learning neural network can be trained to recognize dogs in photographs or video footage with remarkable accuracy provided it sees enough examples. A team at Princeton designed an automated driving system based largely on deep learning.