language


ODSC East 2018 Open Data Science Conference

@machinelearnbot

ODSC East 2018 is one of the largest applied data science conferences in the world. Our speakers include some of the core contributors to many open source tools, libraries, and languages. Attend ODSC East 2018 and learn the latest AI & data science topics, tools, and languages from some of the best and brightest minds in the field. See schedule for many more.. The largest applied data science conference is now 4 days including 2 full training days for even more talks, trainings, and workshops vested in 8 focused courses.


Why AI Could Be Entering a Golden Age - Knowledge@Wharton

#artificialintelligence

The quest to give machines human-level intelligence has been around for decades, and it has captured imaginations for far longer -- think of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein in the 19th century. Artificial intelligence, or AI, was born in the 1950s, with boom cycles leading to busts as scientists failed time and again to make machines act and think like the human brain. But this time could be different because of a major breakthrough -- deep learning, where data structures are set up like the brain's neural network to let computers learn on their own. Together with advances in computing power and scale, AI is making big strides today like never before. Frank Chen, a partner specializing in AI at top venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz, makes a case that AI could be entering a golden age.


Book Reviews

AI Magazine

R B. Abhyankar Emphasizing theory and implementation issues more than specific applications and Prolog programming techniques, Computing with Logic Logic Programming with Prolog (The Benjamin Cummings Publishing Company, Menlo Park, Calif., 1988, 535 pp., $27 95) by David Maier and David S. Warren, respected researchers in logic programming, is a superb book Offering an in-depth treatment of advanced topics, the book also includes the necessary background material on logic and automatic theorem proving, making it self-contained. The only real prerequisite is a first course in data structures, although it would be helpful if the reader has also had a first course in program translation. The book has a wealth of exercises and would make an excellent textbook for advanced undergraduate or graduate students in computer science; it is also appropriate for programmers interested in the implementation of Prolog The book presents the concepts of logic programming using theory presentation, implementation, and application of Proplog, Datalog, and Prolog, three logic programming languages of increasing complexity that are based on horn clause subsets of propositional, predicate, and functional logic, respectively This incremental approach, unique to this book, is effective in conveying a thorough understanding of the subject The book consists of 12 chapters grouped into three parts (Part 1 chapters 1 to 3, Part 2. chapters 4 to 6, and Part 3 chapters 7 to 12), an appendix, and an index The three parts, each dealing with one of these logic programming languages, are organized the same First, the authors informally present the language using examples; an interpreter is also presented. Then the formal syntax and semantics for the language and logic are presented, along with soundness and completeness results for the logic and the effects of various search strategies Next, they give optimization techniques for the interpreter Each chapter ends with exercises, brief comments regarding the material in the chapter, and a bibliography Chapter I presents top-down and bottom-up interpreters for Proplog Chapter 2 offers a good discussion of the related notions: negation as failure, closed-world assumption, minimal models, and stratified programs Chapter 3 considers clause indexing and lazy concatenation as optimization techniques for the Proplog interpreter in chapter 1 Chapter 4 explains the connection between Datalog and relational algebra. Chapter 5 contains a proof of Herbrand's theorem for predicate logic.


Thirteenth International Distributed AI Workshop

AI Magazine

This article discusses the Thirteenth International Distributed AI Workshop. An overview of the workshop is given as well as concerns and goals for the technology. The central problem in DAI is how to achieve coordinated action among such agents, so that they can accomplish more as a group than as individuals. The DAI workshop is dedicated to advancing the state of the art in this field. This year's workshop took place on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State on 28 to 30 July 1994 and included 45 participants from North America, Europe, and the Pacific Rim.


The Yale Artificial Intelligence Project: A Brief Historv

AI Magazine

This overview of the Yale Artificial Intelligence Project serves as an introduction to Scientific Datalink's microfiche publication of Yale AI Technical Reports Researchers develop new ideas and plant them in programs. The programs are cultivated, hybridized, nurtured. The weaker ideas die out. The stronger ideas are grafted onto new stock and serve as the basis of hearty new strains. At Yale, there has been a traditional summer seminar series at which graduate students present their unprepossessing theories to the vocal and critical review of their colleagues.


The Workshop on Logic-Based Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

The workshop was organized by Jack Minker and John McCarthy. The Program Committee members were Krzysztof Apt, John Horty, Sarit Kraus, Vladimir Lifschitz, John McCarthy, Jack Minker, Don Perlis, and Ray Reiter. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together researchers who use logic as a fundamental tool in AI to permit them to review accomplishments, assess future directions, and share their research in LBAI. This article is a summary of the workshop. The areas selected for discussion at the workshop were abductive and inductive reasoning, applications of theorem proving, commonsense reasoning, computational logic, constraints, logic and high-level robotics, logic and language, logic and planning, logic for agents and actions, logic of causation and action, logic, probability and decision theory, nonmonotonic reasoning, theories of belief, and knowledge representation.


BookReviews

AI Magazine

Gul A. Agha's Actors: A Model of Concurrent Computation in Distributed Systems (The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1987, 144 pages, $25.00, ISBN O-262 010925) is part of the MIT Press Series in Artificial Intelligence. This volume is edited by Patrick Winston, Michael Brady, and Daniel Bobrow. In the actor formalism, pioneered by Carl Hewitt (1977), one perceives abstract computational agents, called actors, that are distributed in space. Each actor has a mailbox (and a mail address) and associated with each actor is a behavior. One actor can influence the actions of another actor only by sending it a communication.


BookReviews

AI Magazine

Gul A. Agha's Actors: A Model of Concurrent Computation in Distributed Systems (The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1987, 144 pages, $25.00, ISBN O-262 010925) is part of the MIT Press Series in Artificial Intelligence. This volume is edited by Patrick Winston, Michael Brady, and Daniel Bobrow. In the actor formalism, pioneered by Carl Hewitt (1977), one perceives abstract computational agents, called actors, that are distributed in space. Each actor has a mailbox (and a mail address) and associated with each actor is a behavior. One actor can influence the actions of another actor only by sending it a communication.


Review of Foundations of Cognitive Science

AI Magazine

However, a number of issues are repeated across chapters, and it is not clear that the authors of each chapter had a chance to read the other chapters while they wrote theirs. The different parts of the book could have been better (more explicitly) named; for example, domains on its own means little to me! The book has an advantage in that it provides a collection of chapters on the foundations of cognitive science written by different people; hence, we see differing points of view from experts in given areas, which could not be achieved by a single author. However, a criticism of the book is that nearly all the chapters are by authors with a U.S. affiliation, with a few from England, and I find it difficult to believe that leading cognitive scientists in other countries could not have written something. Thus, we get an American-Anglo view of cognitive science rather than an international one, such as that given in Ó'Nualláin (1995).


Expert Micros

AI Magazine

This advertisement might be posted by any manager delegatcd the responsibility for investigating the applications and market possibilities of expert systems for his/her company . To the rescue have come the authors whose books are reviewed in this article. Each author provides answers to some of the questions raised by those considering the use of expert systems on microcomputers: What are expert systems? Can they be implemented on a PC? Have any successful PC applications been created? Do I really need an expert system?