Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


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Daily Mail

A report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances. It says that requiring humans to remain in control of critical functions during combat, including the selection of targets, saves lives and ensures that fighters comply with international law. 'Machines have long served as instruments of war, but historically humans have directed how they are used,' said Bonnie Docherty, senior arms division researcher at Human Rights Watch, in a statement. 'Now there is a real threat that humans would relinquish their control and delegate life-and-death decisions to machines.' Some have argued in favour of robots on the battlefield, saying their use could save lives.


Stephen Hawking warns that robots could replace humans

Daily Mail

A report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances. It says that requiring humans to remain in control of critical functions during combat, including the selection of targets, saves lives and ensures that fighters comply with international law. 'Machines have long served as instruments of war, but historically humans have directed how they are used,' said Bonnie Docherty, senior arms division researcher at Human Rights Watch, in a statement. 'Now there is a real threat that humans would relinquish their control and delegate life-and-death decisions to machines.' Some have argued in favor of robots on the battlefield, saying their use could save lives.


Chatbot helps asylum seekers prepare for their interviews Springwise

#artificialintelligence

MarHub is a new chatbot developed by students at the University of California-Berkeley's Haas School of Business to help asylum seekers through the complicated process of applying to become an official refugee – which can take up to 18 months – and to avoid using smugglers. Finding the right information for the asylum process isn't easy, and although most asylum seekers are in possession of a smartphone, a lot of the information is either missing or out of date. The development team quickly realized that there was a gap in the market which they felt they could fill. What other original ways could we implement to help refugees and the process of asylum?


The 'robot lawyer' giving free legal advice to refugees

BBC News

A technology initially used to fight traffic fines is now helping refugees with legal claims. When Joshua Browder developed DoNotPay he called it "the world's first robot lawyer". It's a chatbot - a computer program that carries out conversations through texts or vocal commands - and it uses Facebook Messenger to gather information about a case before spitting out advice and legal documents. It was originally designed to help people wiggle out of parking or speeding tickets. But now Browder - a 20-year-old British man currently studying at Stanford University - has adapted his bot to help asylum seekers.


Stephen Hawking warns that AI could be humanity's greatest disaster

Daily Mail

Professor Stephen Hawking has warned that artificial intelligence could develop a will of its own that is in conflict with that of humanity. It could herald dangers like powerful autonomous weapons and ways for the few to oppress the many, he said, as he called for more research in the area. But if sufficient research is done to avoid the risks, it could help in humanity's aims to'finally eradicate disease and poverty', he added. He was speaking in Cambridge at the launch of The Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence, which will explore the implications of the rapid development of artificial intelligence. All great achievements of civilisation, from learning to master fire to learning to grow food to understanding the cosmos, were down to human intelligence, he said.


Google's Eric Schmidt says Hollywood-driven AI fears as unrealistic

#artificialintelligence

Google's DeepMind start-up, which was bought for 255 million ( 400 million) last year, is currently attempting to mimic the properties of the human brain's short-term working memory. Professor Stephen Hawking warned that humanity faces an uncertain future as technology learns to think for itself and adapt to its environment. Google's DeepMind start-up, which was bought for 255 million ( 400 million) earlier this year, is currently attempting to mimic the properties of the human brain's short-term working memory The ethics board, revealed by web site The Information, is to ensure the projects are not abused. Toyotal's home helper robot developer community and working prototype pictured Eric Schmidt's comments (right) follow a warning by Professor Stephen Hawking (left) that humanity faces an uncertain future as technology learns to think for itself and adapt to its environment The report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic was released as the United Nations kicked off a week-long meeting on such weapons in Geneva.


New report calls for ban on 'killer robots' amid UN meeting

#artificialintelligence

The report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic was released as the United Nations kicked off a week-long meeting on such weapons in Geneva. The report calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances. It says that requiring humans to remain in control of critical functions during combat, including the selection of targets, saves lives and ensures that fighters comply with international law. But last year, more than 1,000 technology and robotics experts--including scientist Stephen Hawking, Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak--warned that such weapons could be developed within years, not decades.


New report calls for ban on 'killer robots' amid U.N. meeting

#artificialintelligence

The report by Human Rights Watch and the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic was released as the United Nations kicked off a week-long meeting on such weapons in Geneva. The report calls for humans to remain in control over all weapons systems at a time of rapid technological advances. It says that requiring humans to remain in control of critical functions during combat, including the selection of targets, saves lives and ensures that fighters comply with international law. 'Eye in the Sky' takes on the rules of targeting terror But last year, more than 1,000 technology and robotics experts -- including scientist Stephen Hawking, Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak -- warned that such weapons could be developed within years, not decades.