interaction


Google Home is ready for longer, more complex conversations

Mashable

All the big tech companies are in a race to make their digital assistants sound more natural. For Google, the next step to natural conversation with its Assistant is to eliminate the need to say, "OK, Google" every time you have a request. Continued Conversation will keep the Assistant listening to multiple queries as long as you keep talking and responding. The feature is launching today for English-speaking customers in the United States on the Home, Home Mini, and Home Max, which they can turn on via settings in the Google Assistant app. SEE ALSO: Google's latest assault on Apple proves how far behind Siri really is You still need to say the activation word to begin the conversation with the Assistant, but with Continued Conversation engaged, it keeps listening for 8 seconds after the last interaction to see if you're still talking.


Chatting up your Google Assistant just got easier

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One of the most important things we learn as children is how to communicate with each other. We start with "goo goos and gaa gaas," then on to baby sign language, a few simple words like "momma," and our conversations get more complex from there. For the Google Assistant to have a natural conversation, it should be able to understand when it's being spoken to and should be capable of responding to several requests during an interaction. We're taking another step forward in making your interactions with the Google Assistant more natural with Continued Conversation, available starting today on Google Home, Google Home Mini and Google Home Max. We've heard from a lot of people that adding "Hey Google" before each follow-up question for the Assistant doesn't feel as natural as they'd like.


Soon, machine learning agents behind every application ZDNet

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Many IT and business professionals are just starting to get their feet wet with machine learning, which promises to enable systems to essentially program themselves, based on constantly refreshed data. It's catching on fast -- a survey of 360 organizations by the Economist Intelligence Unit and SAP finds that 68 percent are already using machine learning to enhance their business processes. If machine learning isn't showing up in applications or systems, it's likely to show up soon, according to Joe Hellerstein, co-founder and CSO of Trifacta, and a professor of computer science at the University of California-Berkeley. I recently caught up with Hellerstein, who predicts machine learning will soon be commonplace -- embedded within the tools and applications used on a daily basis within data-driven businesses. "Machine learning technology is difficult for enterprises to engineer, manage and deploy in-house," he explains.


Living with a conversational object – Simon Collison – Medium

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Of course, I've had a voice assistant on my phone for years, but we rarely talk; the main exception being those evenings where we might interrogate it for fun. Such play will typically stray from affable tyre-kicking -- "What kind of Pokemon is Squirtle?" A few months ago I finally bought a smart speaker: a dedicated conduit through which the Internet can penetrate my kitchen. I was determined to forge a valuable relationship with the hefty, fabric-wrapped cylinder, and began by immediately changing the "wake word" to something less gendered, dropping a syllable in the process. Enthusiastically, I set about testing it carefully in real scenarios, eager to identify our combined strengths.


Hisense's AI TV will make you an armchair World Cup expert

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The age of the smart TV is over, says Hisense - the future of television is artificial intelligence. These next-generation sets don't just display images and play sound, but know what's actually happening on-screen and bring you into the action, starting with the 2018 FIFA World Cup. At CES Asia, China's biggest technology show, the company demonstrated its vision with an AI-powered TV that works as a virtual football pundit to help even non-fans wrap their heads around all the tournament's finer details. It includes facial recognition that identifies all of the tournament's 736 players - in both agony and ecstasy - and present full biographies, statistics and headlines plucked from recent articles. If you decide to change sides at half time, the app can even direct you to a store where you can buy a replica of a specific player's kit (though you'll need to scan a quick QR code with your smartphone to actually make the purchase).


Soon, machine learning agents behind every application

ZDNet

Many IT and business professionals are just starting to get their feet wet with machine learning, which promises to enable systems to essentially program themselves, based on constantly refreshed data. It's catching on fast -- a survey of 360 organizations by the Economist Intelligence Unit and SAP finds that 68 percent are already using machine learning to enhance their business processes. If machine learning isn't showing up in applications or systems, it's likely to show up soon, according to Joe Hellerstein, co-founder and CSO of Trifacta, and a professor of computer science at the University of California-Berkeley. I recently caught up with Hellerstein, who predicts machine learning will soon be commonplace -- embedded within the tools and applications used on a daily basis within data-driven businesses. "Machine learning technology is difficult to for enterprises to engineer, manage and deploy in-house," he explains.


Behavioral Data – The Unfair Advantage in the Digital Era

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The emergence of advanced tracking and sensory technologies, as well as solutions that focus on gathering behavioral information online represent a source of unimaginable value for businesses dealing with the consequences of consumer delinquency or any other human-related risk. Forbes emphasizes that telematics or wireless communication of data back to an organization and AI can take predictive abilities and customized products to the next level by recognizing GPS patterns with the data, inferring road & traffic conditions, and even predicting and helping avoid accidents, which could potentially lead to fewer claims to process as well as safer and more satisfied customers. Financial services and insurance industries are the ones most dependent on the ability to understand and build predictive models of human behavior. The opportunity for those industries has two sides – the ability to anticipate defaults, and fraud prevention. In fact, when making lending decisions, analyzing behavioral information in addition to financial information can help a lender avoid a loss of about 5.58% on a quarter of its portfolio, according to Moody's Analytics.


BOSS Magazine 7 AI Trends and What They Mean for Business

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There is no doubt that the artificial intelligence (AI) phenomenon will have a profound impact on businesses large and small this year; that part is easy to predict. What impact it will have, and whether this is a good or a bad thing, is harder to tell. Let's start with the basics of AI. "In our broad definition, AI is a collective term for computer systems that can sense their environment, think, learn, and take action in response to what they're sensing and their objectives. Forms of AI in use today include, among others, digital assistants, chatbots and machine learning. AI is already at work in industry (from sport and manufacturing to investing and healthcare).


Alexa Is Headed to Your Hotel Room

Slate

Amazon's Alexa has infiltrated our homes, offices, bathrooms, and cars. It was only a matter of time before it expanded to other places we spend time, too--like our hotel rooms. While some enterprising chains and establishments had begun introducing Echos and Echo Dots into their guest quarters, Amazon on Tuesday announced Alexa for Hospitality, a hotel-specific version of its assistant software. The announcement included a partnership with Marriott Hotels, where Alexa for Hospitality will debut at select Marriott, Aloft, Westin, Autograph Collection, and St. Regis hotels and resorts this summer. It'll come to other hotels and vacation rental facilities on an invite-only basis.


A Report About Lie Detector App - very soon app might tell if you lie or not - Leamtechi News

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Very soon, your phone might be able to tell if you are lying or telling the truth. There is new machine algorithm wants to tap into the digital interactions that reveal when you are bluffing. Researchers have been finding some ways in which they can turn your phone into a lie detector instrument. There is a new machine learning algorithm which has been built by computer scientists at the University of Copenhagen which can detect honesty and dishonesty by analyzing the way you swipe or tap a smartphone. The research is based on the assumption that dishonesty interactions always take longer and involve more hand movement than honesty interaction.