Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


AI 'lawyer' correctly predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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For the first time, artificial intelligence has been used to predict the outcomes of cases heard at a major European court. Researchers from the University of Sheffield, the University of Pennsylvania and University College London programmed the machine to analyse text from cases heard at the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and predict the outcome of the judicial decision. During tests, the AI used a machine learning algorithm to make predictions with 79 per cent accuracy. "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but we think they'd find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," explained Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science. "It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights."


This AI predicts the outcome of human rights trials

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An artificial intelligence system has already successfully predicted the outcome of hundreds of cases at the European Court of Human Rights, according to rsearchers from the University College London and the universities of Sheffield and Pennsylvania who developed it. According to reports, the AI "judge" examined data sets for 584 cases, with all cases either relating to torture, degrading treatment and privacy. The algorithm analyzed the English language information for each case and then made a decision – a decision that proved to be 79 percent accurate. The vast majority of applications lodged with ECHR are deemed inadmissible, due to the fact the applications don't meet the court's required criteria. This means that each year the court receives thousands of applications it must read through to determine admissibility.


AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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A team of computer and legal scientists from the UK worked alongside Daniel Preoțiuc-Pietro – a postdoctoral researcher in natural language processing and machine learning from the University of Pennsylvania – to extract case information published by the ECtHR. They identified English language data sets for 584 cases relating to Articles 3, 6 and 8 of the Convention. Article 3 forbids torture and inhuman and degrading treatment (250 cases); Article 6 protects the right to a fair trial (80 cases) and Article 8 provides a right to respect for one's "private and family life, his home and his correspondence" (254 cases). They then applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text. To prevent bias and mislearning, they selected an equal number of violation and non-violation cases.


AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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The judicial decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) have been predicted to 79% accuracy using an artificial intelligence (AI) method developed by researchers at UCL, the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania. The method is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm. The study behind it was published today in PeerJ Computer Science. "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but we think they'd find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes. It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights," explained Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science.


AI lawyer: I know how you ruled next summer

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RotM Artificial Intelligence can predict the outcomes of European Court of Human Rights trials to a high accuracy, according to research published today. The use of AI has is slowly seeping into many industries including the legal sector. AI can trawl through vast amounts of information at a faster rate than humans without slowing down, making it easier for lawyers to prepare for hearings. The paper, published in PeerJ Computer Science, shows that the new software has gone one step further. It can judge the final result of legal trials based on the information in human rights cases to 79 per cent accuracy.


Ethical AI predicts outcome of human rights trials

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Artificial intelligence researchers have developed software that is capable of making complex decisions to accurately predict the outcome of human rights trials. The AI "judge" was developed by computer scientists at University College London (UCL), the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania using an algorithm that analyzed the text of cases at the European Court of Human Rights. Judicial decisions from the court were predicted with 79 percent accuracy by the machine learning algorithm. "Previous studies have predicted outcomes based on the nature of the crime, or the policy position of each judge, so this is the first time judgments have been predicted using analysis of text prepared by the court," said Vasileios Lampos, co-author of the research. The study follows warnings from several high-profile academics and entrepreneurs that AI could pose an existential risk to mankind.


An AI predicted the outcome of over 75% of human rights trials

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A team of researchers has used an artificial intelligence system to correctly predict the outcome of hundreds of human rights cases. The AI, developed in collaboration between University College London, the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania, analysed a variety of cases heard in the European Court of Human Rights. It was then able to predict the correct verdict with an accuracy of 79%. While the results make a convincing case for the use of machine learning in legal settings, the researchers don't believe it will mark the end of lawyers and judges. "There is a lot of hype about AI but we don't see it replacing judges or lawyers any time soon," said Dr Nikolaos Aletras, leader of the study at UCL. "What we do think is they'd find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes."


Artificial Intelligence Predicts Outcomes of Human Rights Trials –

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Using Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine learning technology, a team of researchers has predicted outcomes in judicial decisions at the European Court of Human Rights (EctHR) with 79 per cent accuracy. The AI method, developed by researchers from University College London (UCL), University of Sheffield and US-based University of Pennsylvania is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm. "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers but we think they will find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," said Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL's computer science department. "It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights," Aletras added. In developing the method, the team found that judgements by the ECtHR are highly correlated to non-legal facts rather than directly legal arguments, suggesting that judges of the Court are'realists' rather than'formalists'.


Artificially intelligent 'judge' predicts result of human rights trials with 79% accuracy

Daily Mail

An artificial intelligence that predicts the outcome of court proceedings may sound like a futuristic dream. But a new study claims to have developed an AI that predict the results of human rights trials with 79 per cent accuracy. The technology is the first to predict the outcomes of major international court trials by analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm, claim the researchers. The researchers looked at case information by the ECtHR in its publicly accessible database. The team identified English language data sets for 584 cases relating to Articles 3, 6 and 8* of the European Convention of Human Rights.


Now, Artificial Intelligence can predict outcomes of human rights trials - The Economic Times

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LONDON: Using Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine learning technology, a team of researchers has predicted outcomes in judicial decisions at the European Court of Human Rights (EctHR) with 79 per cent accuracy. The AI method, developed by researchers from University College London (UCL), University of Sheffield and US-based University of Pennsylvania is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm. "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers but we think they will find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," said Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL's computer science department. "It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights," Aletras added. In developing the method, the team found that judgements by the ECtHR are highly correlated to non-legal facts rather than directly legal arguments, suggesting that judges of the Court are'realists' rather than'formalists'.