Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


Do We Have A Reason To Fear Artificial Intelligence? (Video with Jason Silva)

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Are artificial intelligence systems intrinsically racist?

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However, by using your zip code, an AI system can infer your race, your religion or your economic standing in your community by where you live. Will an AI system take a person's socioeconomic condition into consideration as part of using FICO scores or zip codes in its statistical model? Known as the EU Data Protection Directive, or Directive 95/46/EC. The consent clause states: "Personal data should not be disclosed or shared with third parties without consent from its subject(s)."


Are artificial intelligence systems intrinsically racist?

#artificialintelligence

However, by using your zip code, an AI system can infer your race, your religion or your economic standing in your community by where you live. Will an AI system take a person's socioeconomic condition into consideration as part of using FICO scores or zip codes in its statistical model? Known as the EU Data Protection Directive, or Directive 95/46/EC. The consent clause states: "Personal data should not be disclosed or shared with third parties without consent from its subject(s)."


Nowhere to hide

BBC News

And Russian app FindFace lets you match a photograph you've taken of someone to their social media profile on the country's popular social media platform Vkontakte. Carl Gohringer, founder and director at Allevate, a facial recognition firm that works with law enforcement, intelligence and government agencies, says: "The amount of media - such as videos and photos - available to us as individuals, organisations and businesses, and to intelligence and law enforcement agencies, is staggering. But Ruth Boardman, data privacy specialist at international law firm Bird & Bird, says individual rights still vary from one EU state to another. And the automation of security vetting decisions based on facial recognition tech raises serious privacy issues.


A massive AI partnership is tapping civil rights and economic experts to keep AI safe

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The Partnership also added Apple as a "founding member," putting the tech giant in good company: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google, and Facebook are already on board. "In its most ideal form, [the Partnership] puts on the agenda the idea of human rights and civil liberties in the science and data science community," says Carol Rose, the executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts who is joining the Partnership's board. "While there will be many benefits from AI, it is important to ensure that challenges such as protecting and advancing civil rights, civil liberties, and security are accounted for," Sears says. Google will be represented by director of augmented intelligence research Greg Corrado; Facebook by its director of AI research, Yann LeCun; Amazon by its director of machine learning, Ralf Herbrich; Microsoft by the director of its research lab, Horvitz; and IBM by a research scientist at its T.J. Watson Research Centre, Francesca Rossi.


A massive AI partnership is tapping civil rights and economic experts to keep AI safe

#artificialintelligence

The organizations themselves are not officially affiliated yet--that process is still underway--but the Partnership's board selected these candidates based on their expertise in civil rights, economics, and open research, according to interim co-chair Eric Horvitz, who is also director of Microsoft Research. The Partnership also added Apple as a "founding member," putting the tech giant in good company: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google, and Facebook are already on board. "In its most ideal form, [the Partnership] puts on the agenda the idea of human rights and civil liberties in the science and data science community," says Carol Rose, the executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts who is joining the Partnership's board. Google will be represented by director of augmented intelligence research Greg Corrado; Facebook by its director of AI research, Yann LeCun; Amazon by its director of machine learning, Ralf Herbrich; Microsoft by the director of its research lab, Horvitz; and IBM by a research scientist at its T.J. Watson Research Centre, Francesca Rossi.


A massive AI partnership is tapping civil rights and economic experts to keep AI safe

#artificialintelligence

The organizations themselves are not officially affiliated yet--that process is still underway--but the Partnership's board selected these candidates based on their expertise in civil rights, economics, and open research, according to interim co-chair Eric Horvitz, who is also director of Microsoft Research. The Partnership also added Apple as a "founding member," putting the tech giant in good company: Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google, and Facebook are already on board. "In its most ideal form, [the Partnership] puts on the agenda the idea of human rights and civil liberties in the science and data science community," says Carol Rose, the executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts who is joining the Partnership's board. Google will be represented by director of augmented intelligence research Greg Corrado; Facebook by its director of AI research, Yann LeCun; Amazon by its director of machine learning, Ralf Herbrich; Microsoft by the director of its research lab, Horvitz; and IBM by a research scientist at its T.J. Watson Research Centre, Francesca Rossi.


UN opens formal discussions on AI-powered autonomous weapons, could ban 'killer robots' - TechRepublic

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In an address to the UN--which included a briefing by the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots--Toby Walsh, professor of Artificial Intelligence at University of New South Wales, highlighted the necessary steps involved in obtaining a ban on fully autonomous weapons. Bonnie Docherty, who represents the Human Rights Watch and Harvard Law School's International Human Rights Clinic, co-authored a report this week highlighting the dangers of fully autonomous weapons. "We are pleased that the countries at this major disarmament forum have agreed to formalize discussions on lethal autonomous weapons systems, which should be an important step on the road to a ban." AI will destroy entry-level jobs - but lead to a basic income for all (TechRepublic) The future of AI in the US: What it could look like in the Trump Administration (TechRepublic) Q&A: Former AAAI chair discusses future of AI research and what's coming up at AAAI next month (TechRepublic) Artificial Intelligence and IT: The good, the bad and the scary (Tech Pro Research) Obama's report on the future of artificial intelligence: The main takeaways (ZDNet) Q&A: Former AAAI chair discusses future of AI research and what's coming up at AAAI next month (TechRepublic)


Will Robots Take Over? Human Rights Watch Urges Artificial Intelligence Weapons Ban

International Business Times

Human Rights Watch issued a report Friday urging a ban on the development of fully autonomous weapons. Human Rights Watch also contended that removing the human element of warfare raised serious moral issues, saying lack of empathy would exacerbate unlawful and unnecessary violence. To prevent the development of fully autonomous weapons, Human Rights Watch recommended comprehensive, legally binding restrictions on international and national levels, as well as formal discussions on the matter to be held at the Geneva Convention's Fifth Review Conference. In response to growing concern over the pursuit of fully autonomous technology, the White House issued a report in October praising the development of artificial intelligence and emphasizing its potential role in future day-to-day life.


AI 'lawyer' correctly predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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Researchers from the University of Sheffield, the University of Pennsylvania and University College London programmed the machine to analyse text from cases heard at the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and predict the outcome of the judicial decision. "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but we think they'd find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," explained Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science. The team of computer and legal scientists extracted case information published by the ECtHR in their openly accessible database. The researchers identified English language data sets for 584 cases relating to Articles 3, 6 and 8 of the Convention and applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text.