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Will Artificial Intelligence Become Your Co-Pilot on the Road?

#artificialintelligence

Tractica opened eyes with its detailed market forecasts for artificial-intelligence (AI) hardware, software, and services targeting the automotive market during the 2016 through 2025 period. The report defines AI as a technology that uses data and algorithms to mimic an individual's ability to learn and solve problems. Tractica says the automotive industry has seen the promise of such technology, and is among the industries at the forefront of using AI to augment human actions and mimic the actions of humans, while also harnessing the advanced reaction times and pinpoint precision of machine-based systems. Both semi-autonomous and fully autonomous vehicles of the future will rely heavily on AI systems. However, associated AI algorithms can require enormous resources of memory and computer time.


Comma AI's dash cams are a stepping stone to autonomous driving

Engadget

I'm never sure what to expect when I walk up the steps of Comma AIs office (which is actually a house in a San Francisco neighborhood). Its founder and all-around rabble-rouser George Hotz (the iPhone and Playstation hacker more commonly known as geohot) has strong opinions about the automotive industry and how he can fix it. The company's "ghost riding for the masses" tagline won't win over regulators, but Comma AI's longterm goal of running your car's operating system seems doable. But first, it's concentrating on dash cams that tap into your car's data. Comma AI's latest piece of hardware is the EON dash cam developer kit.


GM boss: Elon Musk's autonomous car claim's 'full of crap'

Daily Mail

In the last year, Elon Musk has made ambitious claims about the capabilities of Tesla's electric vehicles, even revealing that all cars will now be built with the hardware to support full autonomy. Elon Musk has made ambitious claims about the capabilities of Tesla's electric vehicles, even revealing that all cars will now be built with the hardware to support full autonomy. But, according to General Motors' director of autonomous vehicle integration, Musk is'full of crap' The first models of the $35,000 (£27,000) electric vehicle began production last month. Tesla has remained tight-lipped as to the purpose of the cameras, and made no mention of the devices during the firm's launch of the Model 3 (pictured) last week Tesla CEO Elon Musk, 46, told the launch event that he expects to churn out 500,000 Model 3s a year.


Is Facebook Building An Autonomous Car?

#artificialintelligence

Facebook seems to have a strategy of leveraging its capabilities in social marketing, AR & VR and interestingly, who would have thought of it, leveraging its advanced AI and deep learning capabilities to support the development of autonomous vehicles. Potential car buyers spend anywhere between 30 to 50 minutes every day on Facebook and that has helped the social business make significant inroads in digital prospecting and omni-channel commerce. Facebook believes that car companies are focusing more on the connected car, rather than the connected consumer. With every new customer car buying journey now beginning online, it is possible through Facebook's huge data on a customer's social behavior, to make that experience personalized and completely customized.


Toyota's Self-Driving Cars Get New Lasers to See the World

WIRED

But Luminar, a small company dedicated to a far corner of the nascent autonomous vehicle industry, and its 22-year-old founder, Austin Russell, happily shelled out the $20,000 day-rate to rent Pier 35. Russell's entry into the market puts him firmly in the race with numerous other companies racing to build fully autonomous cars. The engineers behind this technology believe lidar is a crucial to the future of AVs, and dozens of companies, small and large, are trying to build a lidar unit with the perfect balance of range, resolution, manufacturability, robustness, and cost. He insists lidar is the marquee sensor, the way to give the car's software the quality data it needs to make driving decisions in any situation.


Is Your Tesla Eligible For HW 2.5 Update For Full Autopilot?

International Business Times

However, the company did not implement the update and in less than a year, it has already started equipping all its vehicles in the production stage, including the Model 3, with the new HW 2.5 hardware, Electrek reported Wednesday. According to the Electrek report, the company has opted for an upgrade as the HW 2.0 was not capable of enabling Level 5 autonomy -- fully autonomous driving with no need of human interference. Tesla's vehicles are based on Nvidia's Drive PX2 platform for autonomous driving. The company is also getting its cars ready for the day it can actually issue an over-the-air software update and enable full autonomy on its vehicles.


Tesla quietly upgrades Autopilot hardware in new cars

Engadget

Electrek has learned that Tesla is quietly equipping new Model 3, S and X production units with upgraded Autopilot hardware (HW 2.5). Every HW 2.0 or later car should still have the foundations for self-driving functionality, in other words. And while it's "highly unlikely" that these vehicles will need an upgrade when fully autonomy is an option, Tesla will upgrade them to 2.5 for free. Tesla likely has more headroom for vehicle upgrades than this, but it can't do anything that would limit driverless tech to post-2.0 vehicles.


Cheap lidar sensors are going to keep self-driving cars in the slow lane

#artificialintelligence

The race to build mass-market autonomous cars is creating big demand for laser sensors that help vehicles map their surroundings. Most driverless cars make use of lidar sensors, which bounce laser beams off nearby objects to create 3-D maps of their surroundings. Each beam is separated by an angle of 0.4 (smaller angles between beams equal higher resolution), with a range of 120 meters. Austin Russell, the CEO of lidar startup Luminar, says his company actively chose not to use solid-state hardware in its sensors, because it believes that while mechanically steering a beam is more expensive, it currently provides more finely detailed images that are critical for safe driving.


Low-Quality Lidar Will Keep Self-Driving Cars in the Slow Lane

MIT Technology Review

The race to build mass-market autonomous cars is creating big demand for laser sensors that help vehicles map their surroundings. Most driverless cars make use of lidar sensors, which bounce laser beams off nearby objects to create 3-D maps of their surroundings. Each beam is separated by an angle of 0.4 (smaller angles between beams equal higher resolution), with a range of 120 meters. Austin Russell, the CEO of lidar startup Luminar, says his company actively chose not to use solid-state hardware in its sensors, because it believes that while mechanically steering a beam is more expensive, it currently provides more finely detailed images that are critical for safe driving.


lyft-self-driving-game

WIRED

Conventional wisdom on self-driving used to go like this: A smart tech company, like Google's Waymo, writes the self-driving software. Today, Lyft announced it's getting into the self-driving business, launching its own unit to build autonomous vehicle software and hardware. Until today, Lyft's strategy seemed to hinge on hopping between carmakers like General Motors and tech companies like Waymo, striking deals that would put autonomous vehicles on the Lyft platform. Now lots of hardware companies use Android as their operating systems, and Google phones are still around.