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Pilotless planes are near

FOX News

Within the decade, several airlines could be on their way to rolling out pilotless flights, reports Fox Business. Also, United States citizens were more likely, at 27percent, than German and French citizens, at 13 percent overall, to take a flight without a pilot. From those savings, UBS surmises that the consumer would benefit with cheaper ticket costs. In the report, UBS states: "The average percentage of total cost and average benefit that could be passed onto passengers in price reduction for the U.S. airlines is 11 percent."


drones-become-newest-crime-fighting-tool-for-police.html

FOX News

Just one week after the sheriff's department in Cecil County, Md., got its brand new drone up and running, it was asked to investigate a case of stolen construction equipment. So the Cecil County Sheriff sent his Typhoon H Pro to investigate. The sheriff's department in Somerset County, N.J., hopes its drones could help it find missing people. "Years ago, when we had people wander off, we would bring out the rescue department, the fire department, fire department volunteers, K-9 if we had it and we'd search and search and search and never find the person," said Somerset County Sheriff Frank Provensano.


FEDS’ FLIGHT PLAN Airlines told to prep for wider electronics ban

FOX News

In March, officials implemented the initial ban of certain electronic devices on flights to the U.S. from 13 international airports due to reports of increased terror threats that suggested Al Qaeda and other groups were still looking to smuggle explosive materials onboard planes. When DHS implemented the initial ban, it said that there was "reason to be concerned" about attempts by terrorist groups to "circumvent aviation security," and said that terrorist groups continue to "target aviation interests." According to DHS, the affected airports were: Jordan's Queen Alia International Airport, Cairo International Airport, Ataturk International Airport, Saudi Arabia's Kin Abdul-Aziz International Airport, Saudi Arabia's King Khalid International Airport, Kuwait International Airport, Morocco's Mohammad V Airport, Qatar's Hamad International Airport, Dubai International Airport, and Abu Dhabi International Airport. Last week, House Homeland Security Chairman Michael McCaul, R-Texas, told Fox News that recent changes to aviation security were based on "specific and credible intelligence."


Canada clamps down on drones

FOX News

Announced on Thursday by Canadian transport minister Marc Garneau, the new regulations place strict limitations on drone flights close to people, animals, and buildings. "I am taking measures now, before a drone hits an airplane and causes a catastrophic accident," Garneau told the Globe and Mail, adding, "That's the kind of nightmare scenario that keeps me up at night." Canada already had a set of regulations in place aimed at drone users, but in most cases violators had no fear of punishment. Garneau told the Globe and Mail the government needed to do "everything in our power to stop this from happening."


A bird that needs goggles?

FOX News

As the bird flaps its way through the water particles, its wings generate disruptive waves, tracing patterns that help scientists understand how animals fly. In a new study, a team of scientists measured and analyzed the particle trails that were produced by the goggle-wearing parrot's test flights, and showed that previous computer models of wing movement aren't as accurate as they once thought. "We were surprised to find the vortices that are usually drawn in papers and text books as beautiful donut rings turned out to break up dramatically after two to three wing beats," Lentink told Live Science in an email. Creating better models will be an important next step for studying animal flight, Lentink told Live Science.


Military gets a digital pilot

FOX News

Two teams are currently joining forces with DARPA to make ALIAS a reality: Aurora Flight Sciences and Lockheed Martin Sikorsky. At the Lockheed Martin Sikorsky testing, it was clear that the tech is so smart that someone on the ground can pilot it effectively with a bare minimum-- if any-- flight training. Even in highly-advanced, highly-automated aircraft, pilots must manage a high volume of emerging data, handle complex tasks and rapidly respond to any emergency that might arise. As a digital teammate, ALIAS could free up the highly skilled human pilots to focus on tasks that require their special skill sets, talent and experience.