Transportation


Harnessing data from driverless cars to improve transportation

#artificialintelligence

Self-driving cars were once thought of as a far-off, and maybe even impossible, concept, but they're here now. At the end of November, General Motors announced its plan to launch a fleet of driverless cars -- without backup drivers -- across several major U.S. cities, beginning in 2019. In doing so, the auto industry signified that it's prepared to lead a dramatic shift in how both humans and commercial goods move from place to place. Of course, powering this initiative is data -- and likely exabytes of it. Driverless vehicles depend on data for everything from communicating their position on the road, to calculating speed and braking distances, to recognizing traffic signals and upcoming hazards in their path.


Future of AI revenue: Top 10 uses cases for next decade

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence already impacts many aspects of our daily lives at work, at home, and as we move about. Over the next decade, analyst firm Tractica predicts that annual Global AI enterprise software revenue will grow from $644 million in 2016 to nearly $39 billion by 2025, and services related revenue should reach almost $150 billion. These functional areas are applicable to many use cases, industries, and generate benefits for both businesses and individuals. Here are the top ten use cases which will reap financial rewards for AI technology product and service companies, and a broad spectrum of benefits for everyone else. Self driving cars and other autonomous vehicles are consistently called the "next revolution" in transportation, technology, and some say in civilization in general.


?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=Sendible&utm_campaign=RSS

#artificialintelligence

One of the biggest potential pitfalls for developers of autonomous vehicles is psychological: Will most people trust the cars enough to ride in them? It might not be easy to win people over, but it's possible--if a Boston startup's recent tests are any indication. On Tuesday, NuTonomy co-founder and president Karl Iagnemma shared early reactions from people who have ridden in cars controlled by his company's software. "The feedback has been really interesting, and I would say overwhelmingly positive," Iagnemma said at a press briefing, during which NuTonomy and its parent company, Aptiv (NYSE: APTV), announced plans for a new Boston office focused on autonomous vehicles and other mobility technologies. "We've found," Iagnemma continued, "that once people get into one of these cars, typically there's a little bit of maybe nervousness or apprehension because it is a little surprising to see that wheel turn by itself for the first time.


Hackers are the real obstacle for self-driving vehicles

#artificialintelligence

Before autonomous trucks and taxis hit the road, manufacturers will need to solve problems far more complex than collision avoidance and navigation (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies 2017: Self-Driving Trucks"). These vehicles will have to anticipate and defend against a full spectrum of malicious attackers wielding both traditional cyberattacks and a new generation of attacks based on so-called adversarial machine learning (see "AI Fight Club Could Help Save Us from a Future of Super-Smart Cyberattacks"). As consensus grows that autonomous vehicles are just a few years away from being deployed in cities as robotic taxis, and on highways to ease the mind-numbing boredom of long-haul trucking, this risk of attack has been largely missing from the breathless coverage. It reminds me of numerous articles promoting e-mail in the early 1990s, before the newfound world of electronic communications was awash in unwanted spam. Back then, the promise of machine learning was seen as a solution to the world's spam problems.


Apple supplier Foxconn wants self-driving worker shuttles

USATODAY

See how self-driving cars prepare for the real world inside a private testing facility owned by Google's autonomous car company, Waymo. The Navya passenger shuttle is among myriad autonomous vehicles worldwide in various stages of development. And at an event Nov. 17 and 18 on the University of Wisconsin Madison College of Engineering campus, visitors will have the opportunity to check it out. The Taiwan-based electronic manufacturer's plans to use driverless vehicles to move thousands of workers a day at its 22 million-square-foot campus about 30 miles south of Milwaukee could pave new ground for the technology, which promises to reshape transportation in this country. More than a dozen states are scrambling to get ready for self-driving cars, and while major companies from Google to General Motors are testing such cars, few are in use yet.


Lyft offers self-driving car rides in Boston

Daily Mail

The ride-hailing company Lyft is now sending self-driving cars to pick up passengers in a Boston neighborhood. The cars will have backup human drivers at the wheel and will be limited to short routes within the city's Seaport District, a burgeoning tech startup hub. Lyft and its Boston-based partner nuTonomy, which builds self-driving software, announced Wednesday that the pilot project has begun. The Renault Zoe EVs will be limited to short routes within the city's Seaport District The cars will initially be a small number of Renault Zoe EVs, which Nutonomy began road-testing in Boston starting last November. Nutonomy engineers are already working on integrating Lyft software into'a couple of' vehicles, to be deployed sometime'in the coming months,' for actual customer pickups, though no more specific timeline was given.


Redefining 'Safety' For Self-Driving Cars

International Business Times

The event, in which no one was injured and no property was seriously damaged, attracted media and public attention in part because one of the vehicles was driving itself – and because that shuttle had been operating for only less than an hour before the crash. It's not the first collision involving a self-driving vehicle. Other crashes have involved Ubers in Arizona, a Tesla in "autopilot" mode in Florida and several others in California. But in nearly every case, it was human error, not the self-driving car, that caused the problem. In Las Vegas, the self-driving shuttle noticed a truck up ahead was backing up, and stopped and waited for it to get out of the shuttle's way.


Do Self-Driving Cars Dream Of Safe Streets?

#artificialintelligence

Earlier this year at the SXSW Conference in Austin, Texas, Bill Ford said out loud what a lot of people in the auto industry were thinking–or, more precisely, worrying about more than they care to admit. The Ford CEO was talking about the advent of driverless vehicles, a topic that's getting a lot of ink these days as every automaker and some of the biggest players in Silicon Valley pour billions of dollars into the development of "naked" robotic cars (so-called Tier 5 autonomous vehicles, or AVs, without steering wheels or pedals). Engineering the autos will be the easy part, Ford said, because the technology is ramping up quickly. More daunting, though, will be deciding how to program autonomous cars to make life-and-death decisions. "If a vehicle has to choose who does it hit (if it is about to be in an accident), does it save the occupant or 10 pedestrians?


How Mercedes Is Preparing For The 4th Industrial Revolution: Big Data, Machine Learning And Drones

@machinelearnbot

In an era of great uncertainty and disruption for automotive manufacturers, Mercedes and its parent company Daimler are jumping in full throttle as leaders of the 4th Industrial Revolution. Not only are they designing new vehicles, but their services, influence in the transportation industry and factories are transforming to embrace the new opportunities and demands of their customers. Other companies should follow their lead to thrive in the new industrial revolution. What is the 4th Industrial Revolution? Often referred to as industry 4.0, the 4th Industrial Revolution is the shift to smart factories that use a combination of cyber-physical systems, the Internet of Things and the Internet of Systems to connect the entire production chain and make decisions on its own.


Lyft raises $500m 'war chest' in battle with Uber

Daily Mail

Uber rival Lyft is raising an additional $500 million in funding ion its ongoinjg battle with Uber, according to a U.S. share authorization document filed in Delaware. The additional funding round, led by Alphabet's CapitalG, is an extension of the $1 billion round announced in October. The additional funding round, led by Alphabet's CapitalG, is an extension of a $1 billion round announced in October, and raises the firm's valuation to $11.5 billion Axios was first to report the news. In October Lyft had said that the previous round of funding boosted its valuation to $11 billion from $7.5 billion. The fresh funding would raise its valuation to $11.5 billion.