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Some philosophical problems from the standpoint of artificial intelligence

Classics

We may regard the subject of artificial intelligence as beginning with Turing's article'Computing Machinery and Intelligence' (Turing 1950) and with Shannon's (1950) discussion of how a machine might be programmed to play chess. In this case we have to say that a machine is intelligent if it solves certain classes of problems requiring intelligence in humans, or survives in an intellectually demanding environment. However, we regard the construction of intelligent machines as fact manipulators as being the best bet both for constructing artificial intelligence and understanding natural intelligence. Given this notion of intelligence the following kinds of problems arise in constructing the epistemological part of an artificial intelligence: I.


Experiments with a pleasure seeking automaton

Classics

Attempts to write'intelligent' computer programs have commonly involved the choice for attack of some particular aspect of intelligent behaviour, together with the choice of some relevant task, or range of tasks, which the program must perform. Toda (1962), in a whimsical and illuminating paper, has discussed the problems facing an automaton in a simple artificial environment. The reader may find it illuminating to imagine himself (the automaton) before a screen on which is displayed a complex pattern which changes from time to time (sequence of states). These are: 1. the subjective environment graph (figure 1), 2. the stored graph which is that portion of the subjective environment graph which the automaton has stored in its memory as a result of its experience (figure 2 (b)), and 3. the option graph which is that fragment of the stored graph which the automaton'knows' how to reach (figure 2(c)).


BOXES: An experiment in adaptive control

Classics

In brief, we believe that programs for learning large games will need to have at their disposal good rules for learning small games. Each separate box functions as a separate learning machine: it is only brought into play when the corresponding board position arises, and its sole task is to arrive at a good choice of move for that specific position. The demon's task is to make his choices in successive plays in such a way as to maximise his expected number of wins over some specified period. By a development of Laplace's Law of Succession we can determine the probability, This defines the score associated with the node N. To make a move the automaton examines all the legal alternatives and chooses the move leading to the position having the highest associated score, ties being decided by a random choice.


The general and logical theory of automata

Classics

Their role in mathematics presents an interesting counterpart to certain functional aspects of organization in nature. In comparing living organisms, and, in particular, that most complicated organism, the human central nervous system, with artificial automata, the following limitation should be kept in mind. The simplest way to estimate this degree of complexity is, instead of counting decimal places, to count the number of places that would be required for the same precision in the binary system of notation (base 2 instead of base 10). Such cumulative, repetitive procedures may, for instance, increase the size of the result, that is (and this is the important consideration), increase the significant result, the "signal," re