Results


Drone used to smuggle 13 pounds of meth from Mexico

FOX News

SAN DIEGO – A 25-year-old U.S. citizen has been charged with using a drone to smuggle more than 13 pounds of methamphetamine from Mexico, an unusually large seizure for what is still a novel technique for bringing illegal drugs into the United States, authorities said Friday. Border Patrol agents in San Diego allegedly saw the drone in flight on Aug. 8 and tracked it to Rivera about 2,000 yards from the Mexico border. This undated photo provided by the U.S. Border Patrol shows 12 packages of methamphetamine that were confiscated from a U.S. citizen after a border patrol agent spotted a remote-controlled drone swooping over the border fence (U.S. Border Patrol via AP) The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said in a recent annual report that drones are not often used to smuggle drugs from Mexico because they can only carry small loads, though it said they may become more common. In 2015, two people pleaded guilty to dropping 28 pounds of heroin from a drone in the border town of Calexico, Calif. That same year Border Patrol agents in San Luis, Ariz., spotted a drone dropping bundles with 30 pounds of marijuana.


Two members of missing Burundi robotics team spotted crossing into Canada: police say

FOX News

Two members of an African robotics team who were reported missing from an international robotics competition in Washington, D.C. were reportedly spotted crossing into Canada on Thursday morning, authorities said. They were reported missing late Tuesday night. In each report, the team's mentor told police the teens "went missing after the competition and he does not know where [they] could have went." The U.S. State Department issued a travel warning in late June about the African nation, advising Americans of "political tensions, political and criminal violence, and the potential for civil unrest."


Alexa calls cops on man allegedly beating his girlfriend

FOX News

A New Mexico man was arrested for allegedly beating his girlfriend and threatening to kill her -- after Amazon's Alexa called police, authorities said. It's unclear whether the speaker was connected to an Amazon Echo or Echo Dot device, but the Alexa virtual assistant was connected to a landline in the home, Romero said. Her daughter was not harmed, Romero told ABC News. "The unexpected use of this new technology to contact emergency services has possibly helped save a life," Bernalillo County Sheriff Manuel Gonzales III told ABC News.


Drones scope suspect flights

FOX News

Drones could someday have a sort of invisible license plate that allows local authorities to determine who the unmanned aerial system (UAS) belongs too. Pitched by Chinese drone manufacturer DJI, the concept for an electronic identification system for small drones is just one of many ideas as the Federal Aviation Administration looks into potential ways of identifying drone users. DJI suggests drones should use the radio equipment already on board most systems to transmit a unique registration number. That number would identify the drone owner to law enforcement in the event of a complaint or flight through a restricted area. Areas with restricted drone flight, such as airports, could use radio equipment to read that number and report the ID number to the authorities.


ARE DATING APPS SAFE? Experts describe the risks of meeting 'the one' online

FOX News

An Australian man was acquitted Thursday in the murder of a young woman who fell from his balcony two years ago after the two met through the popular dating app Tinder. What, exactly, caused 26-year-old Warriena Wright to plunge 14 stories is not known, but the encounter between the couple -- much of which was captured on an audio tape -- has prompted the question: Are mobile dating apps safe? The answer is complicated, according to dating experts and behavioral psychologists. "These incidents are very rare," said Sameera Sullivan, a relationship expert and psychologist who founded the matchmaking service, Lasting Connections, in 2012. "There's always going to be bad people out there," said Sullivan.


'SNAPSHOT' OF KILLER? Company creates image from DNA to find murderer

FOX News

Faith Hedgepeth was bludgeoned to death four years ago inside her off-campus apartment at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in a case that remains unsolved. The killer left behind a chilling note and traces of DNA -- which a forensic technology company has now used to create a 3-D sketch of what the suspect might look like. A "snapshot tool" developed by Parabon NanoLabs has created a 3-D image of the killer based on DNA traits, and authorities are hopeful the sketch could lead to a break in the case. The Reston, Va.-based Parabon Nanolabs, with funding from the Department of Defense, debuted the breakthrough type of analysis called DNA phenotyping in 2015 which the company said can predict a person's physical appearance from the tiniest DNA samples, like a speck of blood or strand of hair. The DNA phenotyping service, commercially known as "Snapshot," could put a face on millions of unsolved cases, and generate investigative leads when the trail has gone cold.


Judge hears arguments in FAA showdown over gun-firing, flame-throwing drones

FOX News

A judge in Connecticut Wednesday said he planned to rule within a week in a father and son's case against the Federal Aviation Administration over YouTube videos of gun-toting, flame-throwing drones. Austin Haughwout, 19, of Clinton, and his father, Bret Haughwout, produced the videos. They've refused to comply with subpoenas issued by the U.S. attorney's office on behalf of the FAA, saying the subpoenas violate their constitutional right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures and questioning the agency's authority to regulate recreational drones. U.S. District Judge Jeffrey Meyer gave both sides a deadline of Monday, July 11 to file any additional documents. One of the Haughwouts' videos, viewed more than 3.7 million times, shows a flying drone equipped with a handgun firing rounds.


Dad, son fight FAA over gun-firing, flame-throwing drones

FOX News

Austin Haughwout, 19, of Clinton, and his father, Bret Haughwout, are refusing to comply with subpoenas issued by the U.S. attorney's office on behalf of the FAA, saying the subpoenas violate their constitutional right to be free from unreasonable searches and seizures and questioning the agency's authority to regulate recreational drones. A hearing on whether the Haughwouts have to comply with the subpoenas is set for Wednesday before U.S. District Judge Jeffrey Meyer in New Haven. The case potentially has national significance because it would set a precedent on how much authority the FAA has over recreational drone use, said the Haughwouts' lawyer, Mario Cerame. One video, viewed more than 3.7 million times, shows a flying drone equipped with a handgun firing rounds. Another video, viewed nearly 600,000 times, shows a flying drone with a flamethrower lighting up a spit-roasting Thanksgiving turkey.