artificial general intelligence


Judging artificial intelligence on its prospects for judging us Answers On

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Court is now in session, and author Robert J. Sawyer makes the case for leveraging AI to improve ethics and fairness in civil society. With 23 novels under his belt, as well as scores of short stories, scripts, treatments and more, Hugo and Nebula Award-winning author Robert J. Sawyer is not shy about exploring the technological and cultural landscape of our future. Among the many works in his remarkable and widely regarded career, he authored the trilogy WWW (as in Wake, Watch and Wonder) in which a blind teenage girl uses advanced medical technology to augment her vision, only to discover a super-AI consciousness called Webmind that uses the Internet to grow. During the series, Sawyer investigates the possible consequences that such a super-AI could unleash upon society, and how humans might respond. For his perspective on how humanity might relate to future artificial intelligences and what shape those interactions may take, we asked Sawyer about the dynamics of judgment and control; he also shared his overall sentiment on AI development.


How Machine Learning Works and Why It's Important - PaymentsJournal

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Artificial intelligence is one of the most compelling areas of computer science research. AI technologies have gone through periods of innovation and growth but never has AI research and development seemed as promising as it does now. This is due in part to amazing developments in machine learning, deep learning, and neural networks. Machine learning, a cutting-edge branch of artificial intelligence, is propelling the AI field further than ever before. While AI assistants like Siri, Cortana, and Bixby are useful, if not amusing, applications of AI, they lack the ability to learn, self-correct, and self-improve.


The AI, machine learning, and data science conundrum: Who will manage the algorithms? ZDNet

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Artificial intelligence and machine learning are being adopted into the enterprise at a rapid clip and adoption is likely to surge in 2019. What comes next is the real business challenge: How will we manage technology that we likely don't understand? The issue is likely to bubble up in the year ahead. For now, most of us are lulled into thinking more algorithms are better and even assuming we can outsource critical thought to models. Why hurt our brains when we can trust Einstein, Watson, Alexa, Google Assistant, and other software tools to think for us?


Advanced artificial intelligence could run the world better than humans ever could

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There are fears that tend to come up when people talk about futuristic artificial intelligence -- say, one that could teach itself to learn and become more advanced than anything we humans might be able to comprehend. In the wrong hands, perhaps even on its own, such an advanced algorithm might dominate the world's governments and militaries, impart Orwellian levels of surveillance, manipulation, and social control over societies, and perhaps even control entire battlefields of autonomous lethal weapons such as military drones. But some artificial intelligence experts don't think those fears are well-founded. In fact, highly-advanced artificial intelligence could be better at managing the world than humans have been. These fears themselves are the real danger, because they may hold us back from making that potential a reality.


New artificial intelligence does something extraordinary -- it remembers

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When you return to school after summer break, it may feel like you forgot everything you learned the year before. But if you learned like an AI system does, you actually would have -- as you sat down for your first day of class, your brain would take that as a cue to wipe the slate clean and start from scratch. AI systems' tendency to forget the things it previously learned upon taking on new information is called catastrophic forgetting. See, cutting-edge algorithms learn, so to speak, after analyzing countless examples of what they're expected to do. A facial recognition AI system, for instance, will analyze thousands of photos of people's faces, likely photos that have been manually annotated, so that it will be able to detect a face when it pops up in a video feed.


The Enterprise Journey to Artificial General Intelligence

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Incremental steps in exploring artificial intelligence now can position organizations to pounce on a powerful array of machine-powered capabilities in the future. In March 2016, the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and I asked 193 AI researchers how long it would be until we achieve artificial superintelligence (ASI), defined as an intellect that is smarter than the best human in practically every field. Of the 80 respondents, 67.5 percent said it could take a quarter century or more, and 25 percent said it would likely never happen. Given the sheer number of "AI is coming to take your job" articles appearing across media, these survey findings may come as a surprise to some. Yet they are grounded in certain realities.


Advanced artificial intelligence could run the world better than humans ever could

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There are fears that tend to come up when people talk about futuristic artificial intelligence -- say, one that could teach itself to learn and become more advanced than anything we humans might be able to comprehend. In the wrong hands, perhaps even on its own, such an advanced algorithm might dominate the world's governments and militaries, impart Orwellian levels of surveillance, manipulation, and social control over societies, and perhaps even control entire battlefields of autonomous lethal weapons such as military drones. But some artificial intelligence experts don't think those fears are well-founded. In fact, highly-advanced artificial intelligence could be better at managing the world than humans have been. These fears themselves are the real danger, because they may hold us back from making that potential a reality.


If we ever want artificial general intelligence, governments need to invest in it

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Pretty much every tech startup that boasts its use of artificial intelligence is actually focused on an ultra-specific problem. Visual effects company Digital Domain has an AI algorithm that automates and enhances video editing; healthcare startup Babylon developed an AI chatbot to answer the constant barrage of patient questions. They do what they're supposed to. But they'll never lead to something more, something bigger. No matter how great these AI systems sound, no startup will ever stumble upon artificial general intelligence (AGI), which is essentially a complete, human-like AI system that has become truly intelligent.


Want to make robots more human? Try artificial stupidity

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Welcome to the AI era. We missed the official announcement too, but it's obvious that's what we're in. This new paradigm requires the acceptance or denial of a new brand of faith: Artificial general intelligence (AGI). Or, sentient machines, if you prefer. Either way, let's talk about killer robots.


What is artificial general intelligence? ZDNet

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An Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) would be a machine capable of understanding the world as well as any human, and with the same capacity to learn how to carry out a huge range of tasks. AGI doesn't exist, but has featured in science-fiction stories for more than a century, and been popularized in modern times by films such as 2001: A Space Odyssey. Fictional depictions of AGI vary widely, although tend more towards the dystopian vision of intelligent machines eradicating or enslaving humanity, as seen in films like The Matrix or The Terminator. In such stories, AGI is often cast as either indifferent to human suffering or even bent on mankind's destruction. In contrast, utopian imaginings, such as Iain M Banks' Culture civilization novels, cast AGI as benevolent custodians, running egalitarian societies free of suffering, where inhabitants can pursue their passions and technology advances at a breathless pace. Whether these ideas would bear any resemblance to real-world AGI is unknowable since nothing of the sort has been created, or, according to many working in the field of AI, is even close to being created.