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Researchers create a robot that can cling to shark skin underwater

Engadget

Doing so requires researchers to attach some sort of sensor or robot to the animal, but it has to be able to stay on underwater and withstand fast swimming speeds as well as twists, turns and bends. But researchers at Beihang University, Harvard University and Boston College have developed a robot that hang on to slick skin underwater and withstand high speeds and sharp movements. The research team designed their robot in the functional image of the remora's fin. When tested, the suction disc was able to hang on to a variety of smooth and rough surfaces under water, including real shark skin.


New Theory Cracks Open the Black Box of Deep Learning Quanta Magazine

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During deep learning, connections in the network are strengthened or weakened as needed to make the system better at sending signals from input data -- the pixels of a photo of a dog, for instance -- up through the layers to neurons associated with the right high-level concepts, such as "dog." It was a stunning indication that, as the biophysicist Ilya Nemenman said at the time, "extracting relevant features in the context of statistical physics and extracting relevant features in the context of deep learning are not just similar words, they are one and the same." In their experiments, Tishby and Shwartz-Ziv tracked how much information each layer of a deep neural network retained about the input data and how much information each one retained about the output label. The scientists found that, layer by layer, the networks converged to the information bottleneck theoretical bound: a theoretical limit derived in Tishby, Pereira and Bialek's original paper that represents the absolute best the system can do at extracting relevant information.


How Will Artificial Intelligence Impact Alzheimer's Research?

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"We've learned that you cannot make a definite statement about a particular gene," Winston Hide, Professor in computational biology at The University of Sheffield, explains. According to Winston Hide, data reproducibility and unraveling the differential contribution of multiple genes in relevant biological pathways are some of the big issues in this field. According to Barry, the solution might come from imitating the brain's own ability to process information through deep learning. However, can we really make good models of the brain by using deep learning?


Deep Learning with R - Udemy

@machinelearnbot

Deep learning refers to artificial neural networks that are composed of many layers. You will start by understanding the basics of Deep Learning and Artificial neural Networks and move on to exploring advanced ANN's and RNN's. Starting out at a basic level, users will be learning how to develop and implement Deep Learning algorithms using R in real world scenarios. Vincenzo Lomonaco is a Deep Learning PhD student at the University of Bologna.


The AI that can turn any selfie into a 3D image

Daily Mail

Typically, 3D face reconstruction poses'extraordinary difficulty,' as it requires multiple images and must work around the varying poses and expressions, along with differences in lightning, according to the team. The system developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University relies on a convolutional neural network (CNN) to overcome some of the challenges of 3D face reconstruction. The system developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University relies on a convolutional neural network (CNN) to overcome some of the challenges of 3D face reconstruction. Typically, 3D face reconstruction poses'extraordinary difficulty,' as it requires multiple images and must work around the varying poses and expressions, along with differences in lightning, according to the team.


AI could spot Alzheimer's in MRI scans up to a decade before symptoms show

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The AI was trained to correctly spot the difference between diseased and healthy brains, before being tested on its accuracy abilities on a second set of 148 scans – 52 of which were healthy, 48 had Alzheimer's and the other 48 had a mild cognitive impairment that was known to develop into Alzheimer's within 10 years. The algorithm correctly distinguished between healthy and diseased brains 86% of the time, according to the researchers, who added that it was also able to spot the difference between a healthy brain and a mild impairment with an 84% accuracy rating. Last month mobile game Sea Hero Quest – which uses navigation challenges to gather data about spatial movement as part of research into the disease – was expanded to virtual reality for the first time. The game sets users navigation challenges, and they can opt-in to share their data with the researchers behind the game, who can use player performance data to plot spatial navigation skills of different ages groups and genders.


Machine Learning Brings Accuracy to Climate Forecasts

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The increasing number of satellites and advancements in climate models has improved the weather forecasting over the last many years. The UK Met Office and the National Weather Service's climate data archive contains 45 petabytes of information. The researchers have used AI systems to rank spot cyclones, climate models, and extreme weather events using modeled and real-climate data. Machine Learning, slowly but surely, seems to be gaining ground for weather forecast and climate change study.


Handheld scanner divines how nutritious your food really is

New Scientist

FARMERS can now zap their crops with a handheld scanner to instantly determine nutritional content, which could prove crucial in mitigating the effects of climate change on food quality. "Real-time results mean farmers can add fertilisers or tweak moisture levels as crops grow" Farmers can use the app to assess the impact of changing conditions, such as extreme weather and soil quality, on the quality of their crops from year to year. It could allow farmers to mitigate the negative effects of climate change early by adding fertilisers or tweaking moisture levels as crops grow. Other companies are developing similar gadgets for consumers, and sensors that can be fitted onto a smartphone.


From Subject To Soundbite, Results To Hype: Communicating Data Science

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Raw article count rewards analyses of large numbers of small messages (such as a Twitter analysis), while raw word count at least captures the computational demand of applying many kinds of text mining algorithms to the material. Few text mining projects come close to that word count, yet building ngram tables is far less computationally demanding than using neural networks to calculate dependency graphs or performing advanced text mining on 234 billion words of books. Additionally, the results of large data analyses may simply be integrated into algorithmic updates or released over time through public presentations and blog posts, rather than formal papers published in the academic literature, making it even more difficult to assess the scale novelty of a new study. Returning to the Science News article, in correspondence with the authors themselves, it appears that rather than "one of the largest text and data mining exercises ever conducted," a more apt description of their work might have been "one of the largest comparisons published in the academic literature comparing full text informational content to abstracts in the domain of primarily biomedical academic literature."


Predicting The EdTech Trends Of 2017

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'I think we'll see an increased use of online, cloud-based platforms at schools' says Geoff Stead. It's perhaps for this reason that 75% of educators surveyed believe that digital learning content will replace the printed textbook within the next 10 years, according to Deloitte's 2016 Digital Education Survey. Machine Learning for Greater Personalisation'We will see more personalised adaptive learning powered by machine learning' says Priya Lakhani'We will see more machine learning, adaptive learning and cognitive platforms supporting autism' says Alan Greenburg, who references the work of Professor Simon Barron-Cohen from Cambridge University and The Autism Research Trust. Many hope that 2017 will see a wider use of mental health chatbots, such as Facebook Messenger's Joy.