US government


Artificial intelligence beats top pilot in NASA and Google drone race

#artificialintelligence

In another addition to the ever-expanding list of things robots can do better than humans, artificial intelligence has beaten one of NASA's world-class pilots in a drone race. Researchers at NASA's jet propulsion lab in Pasadena, California, revealed Tuesday the results of two years spent developing algorithms for autonomous drones using technology also used for spacecraft navigation, funded by Google. The space agency put its AI to the test on October 12, finding that their robot was nimbler and did not get tired like a human pilot. Related: A robot mocked Elon Musk and his grim AI predictions. He didn't take it well The race, held on October 12, pitted NASA drone pilot Ken Loo against custom-built drones named after comic book characters Batman, Joker and Nightwing, capable of reaching speeds of up to 80 miles per hour.


Tougher than hell

Science

Venus is closest in size and composition to Earth. It's also our nearest neighbor. Yet for decades it has remained veiled. NASA hasn't sent a mission there since 1989, and although Europe and Japan have sent orbiters there more recently, their investigations have stopped largely at the top of the planet's thick sulfur clouds. No planet has touched down on the surface since 1985, when the Soviet Union sent the last in a series of Venus landers, and for good reason: At temperatures of 460 C and pressures of 90 bars, the spacecraft never survived more than a couple hours.


NASA drone race pits humans against an AI pilot

Daily Mail

NASA has pitted a professional drone racer against its AI. The space agency took on pilot Ken Loo on a specially designed course using three purpose built drones named Batman, Joker and Nightwing. While the human prevailed, NASA found its craft, which were funded by Google, were far more consistent - and didn't suffer from tiredness. The space agency took on pilot Ken Loo on a specially designed course using three purpose built drones named Batman, Joker and Nightwing in a project funded by Google. Loo averaged 11.1 seconds, compared to the drones 13.9 seconds The team built three custom drones (dubbed Batman, Joker and Nightwing) and developed the complex algorithms the drones needed to fly at high speeds while avoiding obstacles.


Today: Time for a Gratitude Adjustment

Los Angeles Times

Here are the stories you shouldn't miss today: What are you doing today, other than turning up the air conditioning if you live in Southern California? Spending it with family and friends? Watching TV? (Check out these tips.) Wondering how you are going to cook that turkey? Feeling remorse about the bird that gave its life? However you spend the day, columnist Bill Plaschke wants you to remember the Thanksgiving spirit.


Elon Musk says we only have 10% chance of making AI safe

Daily Mail

Elon Musk has been very vocal about his concerns over artificial intelligence, and now the Tesla and SpaceX CEO has quantified his worries. In a recent talk, Musk claimed that efforts to make AI safe only have'a five to 10 per cent chance of success.' The warning comes shortly after Musk claimed that regulation of artificial intelligence was drastically needed because it's a'fundamental risk to the existence of human civilisation.' Elon Musk has been very vocal about his concerns over artificial intelligence, and now the Tesla and SpaceX CEO has quantified his worries. In a recent talk, Musk claimed that efforts to make AI safe only have'a five to 10 per cent chance of success' Elon Musk's latest company Neuralink is working to link the human brain with a machine interface by creating micron-sized devices.


Hillary Clinton issues warning on artificial intelligence

Daily Mail

Hillary Clinton spoke about the dangers of artificial intelligence in a radio interview with Hugh Hewitt on Wednesday. The failed presidential candidate was on Hewitt's show to promote her book, but the conversation steered towards recent advances in technology. Something that concerns Clinton is the potential for our society to become inundated with artificial intelligence - computers that mimic the human brain to complete tasks for us - such as home office assistants or even robot drones. Amazon's Alexa device, which allows users to shop, play music and look up questions online all by voice, is one example of AI Clinton says that AI can be a good thing, but she's worried that our society is rushing into a brave new world without thinking through the repercussions. 'Yeah, a lot of really smart people, you know, Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking, a lot of really smart people are sounding an alarm that we're not hearing.


Google's search algorithm struggles to rank information

Daily Mail

With millions of views published online every day, it can be difficult for Google to rank information correctly within its search engine. Speaking this week, Eric Schmidt, Chairman of Google's parent firm, Alphabet, explained that it is'very difficult' for the search algorithm to weed out the truth in a sea of opposing articles. Thankfully, Schmidt believes the problem should be easy to address by tweaking the algorithm. Speaking this week, Eric Schmidt, Chairman of Google's parent firm, Alphabet, explained that it is'very difficult' for the search algorithm to weed out the truth in a sea of opposing articles Inaccurate results are often down to "Google bombing" used by groups to be ranked highly. These include linking to a fake news site from several other sources and hiding text on a page that is invisible to humans but visible to the search engine's algorithms.


NASA Finds AI-Powered Drones May Be Safer Than Human-Flown Ones

International Business Times

Drones controlled by humans may soon give in to ones flown completely using artificial intelligence, a new experiment by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has demonstrated. In the demonstration, NASA researchers pitted a human-controlled drone against one controlled by AI. The findings were published on NASA's website and a video of the race was uploaded on its YouTube website Tuesday. "We pitted our algorithms against a human, who flies a lot more by feel. You can actually see that the A.I. flies the drone smoothly around the course, whereas human pilots tend to accelerate aggressively, so their path is jerkier," Rob Reid, the project's task manager, said in a press release.


The Silicon Valley Founder With a Pocket Full of Visas

WIRED

The immigrant entrepreneur's road to Silicon Valley is paved with visas. And every one tells a tale. In the case of Purva Gupta, who is now the 29-year-old founder of Lily, a Palo Alto-based startup that's building an AI-driven fashion app, the precious US government documents weave a kind of personal epic. In the short three years she has been in the United States, Gupta has had six separate visas, each marking a different phase of her startup quest. Gupta's first visa came in 2013, when she moved to the US with her husband, who was getting an MBA at Yale.


Q&A: Famed economist Henry Kaufman says robots are 'greatest challenge' to workers

USATODAY

The S&P 500 is up 21% since Election Day. Henry Kaufman, 90, the renowned economist, former managing director at Wall Street firm Salomon Brothers and author of Tectonic Shifts In Financial Markets, shared his views with USA TODAY on the future of the American worker, tax cuts and the middle class, the retirement savings crisis and the risks facing computer-driven markets. Kaufman is president of Henry Kaufman & Company, an economic and financial consulting firm established in 1988. USA TODAY: Robots are invading the workplace. Is technology a threat to middle-class workers? KAUFMAN: The greatest challenge that workers face and we as a society face is that labor over a longer period of time will become more and more obsolete.