Transportation


Budget 2017: Philip Hammond to spend hundreds of millions to make cars drive themselves

The Independent

The Government is to spend hundreds of millions of pounds encouraging people to make electric cars that drive themselves. It will spend huge amounts of money to try and incentivise electric vehicles. Then eventually those cars will start driving themselves around the country – with Chancellor Philip Hammond backing a plan to have them making their own way by 2021. Jeremy Corbyn used the news about driverless vehicles to joke about having tested "backseat driving" in the Government, which has been bitterly divided before the Budget. Mr Hammond said the technology was being introduced because the Government saw it as the future.


'Connected' cars are hitting UK roads for the first time

Engadget

Slowly, the UK government is realising its dream of making the nation a self-driving research hub. UK Autodrive, a publicly funded consortium that includes Jaguar Land Rover, Ford and TATA Motors, has announced a new set of trials in Coventry today. They will focus on self-driving cars and vehicles that can instantly share information with other motorists and city infrastructure. Researchers will be testing a signal, for instance, that can be sent out by the emergency services -- ambulances, fire trucks and police cars -- to nearby drivers, advising them when and where to move aside. Other test features include a warning signal for intersections deemed too unsafe to cross, in-car information about accidents and traffic jams (negating the need for signs on bridges) and an alert system when a driver in front suddenly hits the brakes (the idea being that this can be hard to spot in rain and fog).


Elon Musk: Tesla electric lorry to be unveiled in late October

The Guardian

The commercial trucking industry appears interested in Musk's proposed battery-powered heavy-duty vehicle, which can compete with conventional diesels and travel up to 1,000 miles on a single tank of fuel. Tesla's plans for new electric vehicles, including a commercial truck called the Tesla Semi, were announced last year, and in April Musk said the release of the semi-truck was set for September. In August, leaked correspondence with vehicle regulators revealed Tesla's plan to test long-haul, electric lorries that move in so-called platoons, or road-trains, that automatically follow a lead vehicle driven by a human. The Department for Transport announced last month that platoons of self-driving lorries will be trialled on England's motorways.


Driverless taxis could hit the streets of London in 2019

Daily Mail

An driverless car firm based in Cambridge has raised £14 million ($16.4 million) in funding - Europe's largest investment in an autonomous car start-up. It hopes to develop a driverless car system tailor-made for the continent's ancient network of roads. Five AI plans to test it's Uber-like service that would allow people to order driverless rides through a smartphone app in south London in 2019. Five AI plans to test it's uber-like service that would allow people to order driverless rides through a smartphone app, in South London in 2019.


Hackers could cause road traffic collisions by taking over electric scooters

The Independent

The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar. Japan's On-Art Corp's CEO Kazuya Kanemaru poses with his company's eight metre tall dinosaur-shaped mechanical suit robot'TRX03' and other robots during a demonstration in Tokyo, Japan Japan's On-Art ...


Scientists create an ethical formula for self-driving cars

Daily Mail

Researchers from The Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Osnabruck created a simple formula that placed a variety of living things and objects in order, based on their'value of life', or survival. The results were measured by statistical models, which created rules that helped to explain the moral decisions made. Researchers from the Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Osnabruck created a simple formula that placed a variety of living things and objects in order, based on their'value of life', or survival. Researchers from The Institute of Cognitive Science at the University of Osnabrück created a formula that placed a variety of living things and objects in order, based on their'value of life', or survival (pictured) The researchers say autonomous cars are just the beginning, as robots in hospitals and other artificial intelligence systems become more common place.


Queen's Speech 2017: What it means for UK tech

Engadget

In last year's Queen's Speech, the government rammed home the message that Britain will become a leader in autonomous transportation. In order to secure the growth of UK's space industry, Theresa May put forward new legislation that would help Britain in its mission to become the number one place for commercial spaceflight in Europe. The proposed Data Protection Bill would deliver on the Conservative manifesto pledge to let young people demand that social networks remove any personal information that they shared before they turned 18. Brexit may be looming large, but the UK will implement the General Data Protection Regulation, new European data protection rules that will come into force next year.


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Daily Mail

Kar-go the robotic pod (artist's impression pictured) could soon be delivering packages direct to your front door, if the startup firm behind its creation can find funding to create a fleet of the vehicle Kar-Go uses state of the art artificial intelligence software to detect and manoeuvre around hazards. As the vehicle arrives at each delivery address, the system automatically selects the package belonging to the corresponding customer for delivery. The Academy of Robotics, has already gained permission from the UK government to test out a prototype of the vehicle (pictured) on public roads. As the vehicle arrives at each delivery address, the system automatically selects the package belonging to the corresponding customer.


Driverless cars could hit UK roads by 2019

Daily Mail

The UK government has handed £12.8 million ($16.4 million) to an AI firm to develop a driverless car system. First trials of the technology began in February 2015 in Greenwich, Milton Keynes, Coventry and Bristol. Volvo launched'Drive Me UK' earlier this year, an extensive UK-based autonomous driving trial, involving up to 100 driverless cars being driven on roads by people later this year. The Departments for Business and Transport gave the huge funding to FiveAI, an AI firm based in Cambridge, who will develop the technology alongside Direct Line, the University of Oxford, Transport for London and the Transport Research Laboratory.


New British law: Accidents blamed on autonomous cars -- not drivers

#artificialintelligence

The British government is working on a new bill that would regulate insurance and liability for accidents involving cars operating in autonomous mode. When such a law is passed it would pioneer how authorities around the world should deal with new technologies in the motoring industry. One of the objectives of the new bill is to ensure accident victims can easily claim compensation if a crash occurs when a car is in autonomous mode. The bill would apply to England, Wales and Scotland and has been welcomed by the insurance industry.