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At Toyota, The Automation Is Human-Powered

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On the assembly line in Toyota's low-strung, sprawling Georgetown, Kentucky factory, worker ingenuity pops up in the least expected places. Even as the automaker unveils an updated version of its vaunted production system, called the Toyota New Global Architecture (TNGA), the company has resisted the very modern allure of automation–a particularly contrarian stance to take in the car industry, which is estimated to be responsible for over half of commercial robot purchases in North America. Despite its dry subject, this book had a radical impact inside and outside of the business community–for the first time, unveiling the mysteries of Japanese industrial expertise and popularizing terms like lean production, continuous improvement, andon assembly lines, seven wastes or mudas and product flow. Codified as the Toyota New Global Architecture, this strategy doesn't primarily target labor to reduce production expenses but instead is weighted toward smarter use of materials; reengineering automobiles so their component parts are lighter and more compact and their weight distribution is maxed out for performance and fuel efficiency; more economical global sharing of engine and vehicle models (trimming back more than 100 different platforms to fewer than ten); and a renewed emphasis on elusive lean concepts, such as processes that allow assembly lines to produce a different car one after another with no downtime.


How AI in cars will affect the environment

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Tech advancements have been making life easier for years now -- especially on the road. From apps that save driving time to smart streets that track available parking, computer programs are helping streamline transit like never before. And now, thanks to ongoing developments in machine learning, artificial intelligence (AI) is taking convenient travel one step further. As I've written about recently, AI has become a major player in the auto industry. Current and in-development smart features include things like impact detection, self-driving programs, and built-in smart assistants.


Don't worry, driverless cars are learning from Grand Theft Auto

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In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix. The blockbuster video game is one of the simulation platforms researchers and engineers increasingly rely on to test and train the machines being primed to take control of the family sedan. Companies from Ford Motor Co. to Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo may boast about putting no-hands models on the market in three years, but there's a lot still to learn about drilling algorithms in how to respond when, say, a mattress falls off a truck on the freeway. If automakers and tech enterprises want to make their deadline, they have to hurry up.


Don't Worry, Driverless Cars Are Learning From Grand Theft Auto

#artificialintelligence

In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix. The blockbuster video game is one of the simulation platforms researchers and engineers increasingly rely on to test and train the machines being primed to take control of the family sedan. Companies from Ford Motor Co. to Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo may boast about putting no-hands models on the market in three years, but there's a lot still to learn about drilling algorithms in how to respond when, say, a mattress falls off a truck on the freeway. If automakers and tech enterprises want to make their deadline, they have to hurry up.


Toyota Turns to AI for a Better Electric Car

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Toyota Motor Corp. is betting the keys to longer-range electric cars and cheaper fuel cells may lie in machines that act like humans. The Japanese carmaker's Toyota Research Institute is pledging $35 million over the next four years toward putting artificial intelligence to work on identifying new materials that can be used in batteries or catalysts that power hydrogen-fueled cars. Using AI and machine learning will expedite development by a magnitude of years, according to the company. "We want to accelerate the rate at which we can design or discover new materials for fuel cells and batteries," Eric Krotkov, chief operating officer of TRI, said in a phone interview. Faster discoveries of advanced materials will support Toyota's broader goal of ridding 90 percent of carbon emissions from its vehicles by 2050.


Toyota lets AI loose on hunt for cheaper fuel cells

The Japan Times

SAN FRANCISCO – Toyota Motor Corp. is betting the keys to longer-range electric cars and cheaper fuel cells may lie in machines that act like humans. The carmaker's Toyota Research Institute is pledging $35 million over the next four years toward putting artificial intelligence to work on identifying new materials that can be used in batteries or catalysts that power hydrogen-fueled cars. Using AI and machine learning will expedite development by a magnitude of years, according to the company. "We want to accelerate the rate at which we can design or discover new materials for fuel cells and batteries," Eric Krotkov, chief operating officer of TRI, said in a phone interview. Faster discoveries of advanced materials will support Toyota's broader goal of ridding 90 percent of carbon emissions from its vehicles by 2050.


Striving for 'Invisible' Technology - Disruption

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A technology that acts seamlessly for us, in essence, becomes invisible. When that technology enables us – to do more, to be better, to be safer – without us perceiving its involvement, then it has achieved a high level of usefulness and invisible integration, a kind of symbiosis with us. Seamless invisible integration into our lives can be a strong indicator of a successful and useful technology, and is something to strive for when developing the technologies of the future. An interesting example of this is Toyota's'Guardian' assistive technology for cars where they're aiming to create a, "computationally rich and perception rich vehicle". Essentially, the driver is in control of the vehicle as normal but the guardian angel keeps an eye out for any exceptional events, using artificial intelligence to evaluate perceived risk on the fly, and most importantly, having the power to take over control in an emergency.


How artificial intelligence is affecting and improving transportation

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Levels of Driving Automation In 2014, SAE International established International Standard J3016, which created an overarching system used to define gradients in automated driving. Grading vehicles on a scale from 0 (no automation) to 5 (high automation), the standard makes a crucial distinction between Level 2 and Level 3, where the car takes on the task of monitoring the environment. The standard applies to the Concept-i specifically, as Toyota has set a goal of reaching Level 4 compliance (where the vehicle handles all driving tasks in certain modes) by 2020. That doesn't mean you're stuck with a car that does the work for you, though – these AIs can incrementally take control of the car or transfer it, so optimization goes a lot further than an on/off switch. Personalization What sets an artificial intelligence vehicle apart from simple autopilot is that AI can – and does – learn.


How artificial intelligence is affecting and improving transportation

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A few years ago, the buzz over self-driving cars evolved from science fiction to an actualized game plan for the coming years, and now, it's even closer to realization. Today's cutting-edge automobile models boast integrated artificial intelligence systems that can handle the road on their own, and also work in myriad ways to make the driving process safer and easier. We've teamed up with Toyota – makers of the Concept-i automobile that was unveiled at CES 2017 – to focus on how exactly these exceptionally smart cars will change driving, and it's no exaggeration to call it a complete overhaul. It seems like the only thing these cars don't do is fly. And for that, there's always next year's model.


Car Tech Was The Only True Source Of Innovation At CES 2015

AITopics Original Links

I've been attending the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) for decades. During that time I've observed not only year-over-year incremental improvement, but also the big leaps in technological innovation. At this year's show, I didn't notice any groundbreaking advances in the smart-home area that has witnessed over a dozen platforms being introduced this year alone – guaranteeing another year of automation and security gadgets in your house that don't talk to each other. Despite the hype, I didn't find it in wearable tech either, where many products still don't connect to the cloud and the only thing being seriously discussed is the Apple Watch, which was not even on display at CES. I also didn't find it in video, where 4K Ultra HD is still looking for relevance two years after being introduced.