Results


The race to own the autonomous super highway: Digging deeper into Broadcom's offer to buy Qualcomm

Robohub

Governor Andrew Cuomo of the State of New York declared last month that New York City will join 13 other states in testing self-driving cars: "Autonomous vehicles have the potential to save time and save lives, and we are proud to be working with GM and Cruise on the future of this exciting new technology." For General Motors, this represents a major milestone in the development of its Cruise software, since the the knowledge gained on Manhattan's busy streets will be invaluable in accelerating its deep learning technology. In the spirit of one-upmanship, Waymo went one step further by declaring this week that it will be the first car company in the world to ferry passengers completely autonomously (without human engineers safeguarding the wheel). As unmanned systems are speeding ahead toward consumer adoption, one challenge that Cruise, Waymo and others may counter within the busy canyons of urban centers is the loss of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite data. Robots require a complex suite of coordinating data systems that bounce between orbiting satellites to provide positioning and communication links to accurately navigate our world.


Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper

Daily Mail

Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy'smart' cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior. The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and'give an extra set of eyes' to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment. 'We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs,' said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a'dashcam on steroids.' The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret'profiling' and misuse of data. US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.


Privacy fears over artificial intelligence as crimestopper

#artificialintelligence

Police in the US state of Delaware are poised to deploy "smart" cameras in cruisers to help authorities detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, missing child or straying senior. The video feeds will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features and "give an extra set of eyes" to officers on patrol, says David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment. "We are helping officers keep their focus on their jobs," said Hinojosa, who touts the new technology as a "dashcam on steroids." The program is part of a growing trend to use vision-based AI to thwart crime and improve public safety, a trend which has stirred concerns among privacy and civil liberties activists who fear the technology could lead to secret "profiling" and misuse of data. US-based startup Deep Science is using the same technology to help retail stores detect in real time if an armed robbery is in progress, by identifying guns or masked assailants.


Nvidia hails a robotaxi with next step in AI computing

#artificialintelligence

It will be the first of its kind among the autonomous vehicle market, as Nvidia race ahead and offer passengers an on demand service to take them to their destination and giving accessibility to everyone including elderly and disabled passengers. The technology making robotaxis a possibility is Nvidia's Drive PX AI platform, dubbed Pegasus, which delivers all the capabilities of a data centre in a supercomputer the size of a license plate. The size, cost and power demands of existing AI computing solutions, Nvidia claims, makes them impractical for production vehicles. The fleet will use ZF's ProAI self-driving platform for the vehicles, based on Nvidia's Drive PX AI platform.


Where Cars Are the Stars: NVIDIA AI-Powered Vehicles Dazzle at GTC Europe The Official NVIDIA Blog

#artificialintelligence

The race car features four electric motors and 15 sensors, and can reach speeds up to 300 kmh (186 mph). Visitors gleefully opened and closed the falcon wing doors in the Model X, while learning about how Tesla Motors equips all its vehicles with the DRIVE PX platform for the second generation Autopilot 2.0 and 2.5. Fully equipped models will have six NVIDIA processors to power Traffic Jam Pilot, virtual cockpit instrumentation, the infotainment system, and headrest tablets for backseat passengers. From the vehicles on display, to our announcement of NVIDIA DRIVE PX Pegasus, the world's first AI computer for Level 5 robotaxis, GTC Europe offers visitors a glimpse into the future of transportation.


NVIDIA unveils platform for fully autonomous cars

Daily Mail

The Pegasus line will be available by the middle of 2018 for automakers to begin developing vehicles and testing software algorithms needed to control future driverless cars, NVIDIA executives told a developers' conference in Munich on Tuesday. The deal between Deutsche Post, ZF and NVIDIA will include future Deutsche Post StreetScooter delivery trucks. In Munich, the three partners are showcasing a prototype StreetScooter running NVIDIA Drive PX chips used to control sensors including six cameras, one radar and one lidar, or 3D laser camera. De Ambroggi said NVIDIA's Pegasus automotive platform was the first with the processing power for automakers to begin developing truly autonomous vehicles, which could be upgraded with software improvements ahead of actual roadway deployments.


Nvidia's new supercomputer is designed to drive fully autonomous vehicles

Mashable

Nvidia wants to make it easier for automotive companies to build self-driving cars, so it's releasing a brand new supercomputer designed to drive them. The chipmaker claims its new supercomputer is the world's first artificial intelligence computer designed for "Level 5" autonomy, which means vehicles that can operate themselves without any human intervention. The new computer will be part of Nvidia's existing Drive PX platform, which the GPU-maker offers to automotive companies in order to provide the processing power for their self-driving car systems. Huang announced Nvidia will soon release a new software development kit (SDK), Drive IX, that will help developers to build new AI-partner programs to improve in-car experience.


Nvidia aims for level 5 vehicle autonomy with Pegasus

ZDNet

By the middle of 2018, Nvidia believes it will have a system capable of level 5 autonomy in the hands of the auto industry, which will allow for fully self-driving vehicles. Pegasus is rated as being capable of 320 trillion operations per second, which the company claims is a thirteen-fold increase over previous generations. In May, Nvidia took the wraps off its Tesla V100 accelerator aimed at deep learning. The company said the V100 has 1.5 times the general-purpose FLOPS compared to Pascal, a 12 times improvement for deep learning training, and six times the performance for deep learning inference.


nvidia-introduces-a-computer-for-level-5-autonomous-cars

Engadget

But while automakers are still dropping level 2 and sometimes level 3 vehicles into the market, NVIDIA has announced its first AI computer, the NVIDIA Drive PX Pegasus that it says is capable of level 5 autonomy. The computing needed to power a self-driving car's AI and data crunching not to mention the huge amounts of data coming from potentially dozens of cameras, LiDAR sensors, short and long-range radar is staggering and usually means there's a small server room stored in the trunk. The new NVIDIA Drive PX Pegasus AI computer is the size of a license plate and uses far less power than the current model. The delivery service is looking to deploy a pilot fleet with the current Drive PX in 2018.


Waymo and Intel Combine to Power the Future of Self-Driving Cars

WIRED

For months now, major companies have been hooking up--Uber and Daimler, Lyft and General Motors, Microsoft and Volvo--but Intel CEO Brian Krzanich's announcement on Monday that the giant chipmaker is helping Waymo, Google's self-driving car project, build robocar technology registers as some seriously juicy gossip. Krzanich said Monday that Waymo's newest self-driving Chrysler Pacificas, delivered last December, use Intel technology to process what's going on around them and make safe decisions in real time. And last year, Google announced it had created its own specialized chip that could help AVs recognize common driving situations and react efficiently and safely. "Our self-driving cars require the highest-performance compute to make safe driving decisions in real-time," Waymo CEO John Krafcik said in a statement.