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AI everywhere

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"We invented a computing model called GPU accelerated computing and we introduced it almost slightly over 10 years ago," Huang said, noting that while AI is only recently dominating tech news headlines, the company was working on the foundation long before that. Nvidia's tech now resides in many of the world's most powerful supercomputers, and the applications include fields that were once considered beyond the realm of modern computing capabilities. Now, Nvidia's graphics hardware occupies a more pivotal role, according to Huang – and the company's long list of high-profile partners, including Microsoft, Facebook and others, bears him out. GTC, in other words, has evolved into arguably the biggest developer event focused on artificial intelligence in the world.


1 Company Is Already Winning AI -- The Motley Fool

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NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA) is primarily known as the company that revolutionized computer gaming. The debut of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) in 1999 provided gamers with faster, clearer, and more lifelike images. The GPU was designed to quickly perform complex mathematical calculations that were necessary to accelerate the creation of realistic graphics. It achieved this feat by performing many functions at the same time, known as parallel computing. This resulted in faster, smoother motion in game graphics and a revolution in modern gaming.


This Tiny Supercomputer Is the New Wave of Artificial Intelligence (AI)

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From just powering gaming computers, NVIDIA Corporation (NASDAQ:NVDA) has advanced its GPU business to focusing the use of its technology to power advanced machine technologies. NVIDIA DGX-1 – This is what is known to be the world's first commercially available supercomputer designed specifically for deep learning. NVIDIA claims that DGX-1 is a supercomputer delivering the computing power of 250 2-socket servers in a box. The company states on their website that its NVIDIA NVLink implementation delivers massive increase in GPU memory capacity, giving you a system that can learn, see, and simulate our world--a world with an infinite appetite for computing. NVIDIA also claims the DGX-1 can be trained for tasks like image recognition and will perform significantly faster than other servers.


The Year in Machine Learning (Part One)

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This is the first installment in a three-part review of 2016 in machine learning and deep learning. In Part Two, we cover developments in each of the leading open source machine learning and deep learning projects. Part Three will review the machine learning and deep learning moves of commercial software vendors. As organizations expand the use of machine learning for profiling and automated decisions, there is growing concern about the potential for bias. In 2016, reports in the media documented racial bias in predictive models used for criminal sentencing, discriminatory pricing in automated auto insurance quotes, an image classifier that learned "whiteness" as an attribute of beauty, and hidden stereotypes in Google's word2vec algorithm.


The Pint-Sized Supercomputer That Companies Are Scrambling to Get

MIT Technology Review

To companies grappling with complex data projects powered by artificial intelligence, a system that Nvidia calls an "AI supercomputer in a box" is a welcome development. Early customers of Nvidia's DGX-1, which combines machine-learning software with eight of the chip maker's highest-end graphics processing units (GPUs), say the system lets them train their analytical models faster, enables greater experimentation, and could facilitate breakthroughs in science, health care, and financial services. Data scientists have been leveraging GPUs to accelerate deep learning--an AI technique that mimics the way human brains process data--since 2012, but many say that current computing systems limit their work. Faster computers such as the DGX-1 promise to make deep-learning algorithms more powerful and let data scientists run deep-learning models that previously weren't possible. The DGX-1 isn't a magical solution for every company.


This is why dozens of companies have bought Nvidia's $129,000 deep-learning supercomputer in a box

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To companies grappling with complex data projects powered by artificial intelligence, a system that Nvidia calls an "AI supercomputer in a box" is a welcome development. Early customers of Nvidia's DGX-1, which combines machine-learning software with eight of the chip maker's highest-end graphics processing units (GPUs), say the system lets them train their analytical models faster, enables greater experimentation, and could facilitate breakthroughs in science, health care, and financial services. Data scientists have been leveraging GPUs to accelerate deep learning--an AI technique that mimics the way human brains process data--since 2012, but many say that current computing systems limit their work. Faster computers such as the DGX-1 promise to make deep-learning algorithms more powerful and let data scientists run deep-learning models that previously weren't possible. The DGX-1 isn't a magical solution for every company.


Tesla P100 by Nvidia is the biggest chip with 15 billion transistors

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Every technological gadget and machines rely on chips to perform its operations and activities. One of the leading company, Nvidia has recently announced the launch of Tesla P100, a data centre accelerator of 15 billion transistor chip. It is specifically designed for deep learning AI technology. Nvidia has made the announcement regarding Tesla P100 at the GPU conference held in San Jose, California. Jen-Hsun Huang, the CEO has asserted that Tesla P100 is the world's largest chip till date with 15 billion transistors on a single chip.


The New Intel: How Nvidia Went From Powering Video Games To Revolutionizing Artificial Intelligence

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Nvidia cofounder Chris Malachowsky is eating a sausage omelet and sipping burnt coffee in a Denny's off the Berryessa overpass in San Jose. It was in this same dingy diner in April 1993 that three young electrical engineers--Malachowsky, Curtis Priem and Nvidia's current CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang--started a company devoted to making specialized chips that would generate faster and more realistic graphics for video games. East San Jose was a rough part of town back then--the front of the restaurant was pocked with bullet holes from people shooting at parked cop cars--and no one could have guessed that the three men drinking endless cups of coffee were laying the foundation for a company that would define computing in the early 21st century in the same way that Intel did in the 1990s. "There was no market in 1993, but we saw a wave coming," Malachowsky says. "There's a California surfing competition that happens in a five-month window every year.


The New Intel: How Nvidia Went From Powering Video Games To Revolutionizing Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Nvidia cofounder Chris Malachowsky is eating a sausage omelet and sipping burnt coffee in a Denny's off the Berryessa overpass in San Jose. It was in this same dingy diner in April 1993 that three young electrical engineers--Malachowsky, Curtis Priem and Nvidia's current CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang--started a company devoted to making specialized chips that would generate faster and more realistic graphics for video games. East San Jose was a rough part of town back then--the front of the restaurant was pocked with bullet holes from people shooting at parked cop cars--and no one could have guessed that the three men drinking endless cups of coffee were laying the foundation for a company that would define computing in the early 21st century in the same way that Intel did in the 1990s. "There was no market in 1993, but we saw a wave coming," Malachowsky says. "There's a California surfing competition that happens in a five-month window every year.


The New Intel: How Nvidia Went From Powering Video Games To Revolutionizing Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

It was in this same dingy diner in April 1993 that three young electrical engineers--Malachowsky, Curtis Priem and Nvidia's current CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang--started a company devoted to making specialized chips that would generate faster and more realistic graphics for video games. "We've been investing in a lot of startups applying deep learning to many areas, and every single one effectively comes in building on Nvidia's platform," says Marc Andreessen of venture capital firm Andreessen Horowitz. Starting in 2006, Nvidia released a programming tool kit called CUDA that allowed coders to easily program each individual pixel on a screen. From his bedroom, Krizhevsky had plugged 1.2 million images into a deep learning neural network powered by two Nvidia GeForce gaming cards.