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Nvidia announces $2,999 Titan V, 'the most powerful PC GPU ever created'

@machinelearnbot

It seems like Nvidia announces the fastest GPU in history multiple times a year, and that's exactly what's happened again today; the Titan V is "the most powerful PC GPU ever created," in Nvidia's words. It represents a more significant leap than most products that have made that claim, however, as it's the first consumer-grade GPU based around Nvidia's new Volta architecture. That said, a liberal definition of the word "consumer" is in order here -- the Titan V sells for $2,999 and is focused around AI and scientific simulation processing. Nvidia claims up to 110 teraflops of performance from its 21.1 billion transistors, with 12GB of HBM2 memory, 5120 CUDA cores, and 640 "tensor cores" that are said to offer up to 9 times the deep-learning performance of its predecessor. Also it comes in gold and black, which looks pretty cool.


"I Am AI" docuseries spotlights innovators' groundbreaking achievements NVIDIA Blog

#artificialintelligence

Medical devices that monitor and respond to changes in our health. Robotic assistants that know what we want before we do. Kitchens that help us with our shopping and plan our meals. Every day, we hear about how artificial intelligence is going to change the world. Amid all this focus on the future, it's easy to ignore an unavoidable truth: AI is already changing the world in significant ways.


Updated AWS Deep Learning AMIs: New Versions of TensorFlow, Apache MXNet, Keras, and PyTorch

@machinelearnbot

The AMIs also come with improved framework support for NVIDIA Volta. They include PyTorch v0.3.0, and support NVIDIA CUDA 9 and cuDNN 7, with significant performance improvements for training models on NVIDIA Volta GPUs. As well, they include a version of TensorFlow built from the master and merged with NVIDIA processors for Volta support. We've also added Keras 2.0 support on the CUDA 9 version of the AWS Deep Learning AMIs to work with TensorFlow as the default backend.


Medical Imaging Drives GPU Accelerated Deep Learning Developments

#artificialintelligence

Although most recognize GE as a leading name in energy, the company has steadily built a healthcare empire over the course of decades, beginning in the 1950s in particular with its leadership in medical X-ray machines and later CT systems in the 1970s and today, with devices that touch a broad range of uses. Much of GE Healthcare's current medical device business is rooted in imaging hardware and software systems, including CT imaging machines and other diagnostic equipment. The company has also invested significantly in the drug discovery and production arena in recent years--something the new CEO of GE, John Flannery (who previously led the healthcare division at GE), identified as one of three main focal points for GE's financial future. According to Flannery, the company's healthcare unit has one million scanners in service globally, which generate 50,000 scans every few moments. As one might imagine, this kind of volume will increasingly require more processing and analysis capabilities cooked in--something the company is seeking to get ahead with in today's partnership with Nvidia.


IBM Designs a "Performance Beast" for AI

#artificialintelligence

Companies running AI applications often need as much computing muscle as researchers who use supercomputers do. IBM's latest system is aimed at both audiences. The company last week introduced its first server powered by the new Power9 processor designed for AI and high-performance computing. The powerful technologies inside have already attracted the likes of Google and the US Department of Energy as customers. The new IBM Power System AC922 is equipped with two Power9 CPUs and from two to six NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs.


The highest-performing PC components you can buy today

PCWorld

The obvious choice here isn't actually the "Price is no object" pick in our graphics cards buying guide. If you demand the pinnacle of PC gaming performance no matter the cost, you'll want to pick up Nvidia's Titan Xp ($1,200 on Nvidia's website). This second revision of the "Pascal" GPU generation's Titan uses Nvidia's full-blown GP102 graphics processor to power the most graphically demanding games of today without breaking a sweat, even at 4K resolution. The even more potent Titan V ($3,000 on Nvidia's website) pushes further with a next-gen "Volta" GPU and HBM2 memory, but it's specialized for machine learning tasks and data science. Realistically, most gamers should pick up the still-ridonkulously powerful GeForce GTX 1080 Ti ($800 for an EVGA GTX 1080 Ti FTW3 on Amazon).


How Nvidia Leapfrogged the AI Chip Market

#artificialintelligence

Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang showed up at a gathering of artificial intelligence researchers in Long Beach, Calif. One was an orchestral piece inspired by music from the Star Wars movies, but composed by an AI program from Belgian startup AIVA that--of course--relies on Nvidia chips. The music went over big with the crowd of AI geeks attending the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference, known as NIPS, including some giants in the field like Nicholas Pinto, head of deep learning at Apple, and Yann LeCun, director of AI Research at Facebook. LeCun was quoted saying the Star Wars bit was "a nice surprise." Huang's other surprise was a bit more practical, and showed just how competitive the AI chip market niche has become.


NVIDIA Researchers Showcase Major Advances in Deep Learning at NIPS NVIDIA Blog

@machinelearnbot

AI has become part of the public consciousness. Researchers and data scientists have been sharing their groundbreaking work -- at what is officially known as the Conference and Workshop on Neural Information Processing Systems -- for three decades. But it's only with the recent explosion of interest in deep learning that NIPS has really taken off. We had two papers accepted to the conference this year, and contributed to two others. The researchers involved are among the 120 people on the NVIDIA Research team focused on pushing the boundaries of technology in machine learning, computer vision, self-driving cars, robotics, graphics, computer architecture, programming system, and other areas.


TITAN V: Now NVIDIA is talking deep-learning horsepower

@machinelearnbot

This is a graphics card created for the PC. VentureBeat's Blair Frank said "The new Titan V card will provide customers with a Nvidia Volta chip that they can plug into a desktop computer." Thursday marked its debut, positioned as "the world's most powerful GPU for the PC." CEO Jensen Huang did the introduction. The announcement took place at the annual AI gathering, the NIPS (Neural Information Processing Systems) conference. It can carry massive amounts of power and speed AI computation.


Nvidia's hugely powerful $3,000 Titan V PC GPU is the fastest ever

#artificialintelligence

Looking for a way to turn your home computer into a deep-learning AI super-monster? Nvidia has an expensive answer. The new Titan V GPU promises a crazy amount of processing for deep learning and AI applications. It's nine times more powerful -- at 110 teraflops -- than last year's Titan X, Nvidia's last massive desktop graphics processor aimed at machine learning applications. The Titan V is based on Nvidia's newer Volta chip architecture, which is also being used in Nvidia's Xavier self-driving car system and for data centers.