Media


AI is changing how you watch TV

#artificialintelligence

Recent breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and machine learning are helping Hollywood get even smarter about how it captures an audience, and the implications for your entertainment are staggering. Will artificial intelligence transform the entertainment industry? Entertainment leaders like Netflix tap into these massive pools of viewer preference data to build algorithms that recommend new viewing material, and these algorithms leverage AI to learn what you'll enjoy most. AI algorithms on major cable networks like HBO will likely recommend new shows in the same way that Netflix connects viewers to its library of titles, granting customized entertainment to a majority of viewers across all networks and providers.


Why Sci-Fi Novels Are the New Comic Books For Streaming TV

WIRED

You already get a Star Wars movie every year. The choices are: Either take a risk and make original stuff, or take slightly less of a risk with a known quantity from somewhere. TV's looking for books; books work better on TV. For the kind of people who roll science fiction books on their Kindle like a development agent rolls calls during casting season, this middle is a very good one to be caught in.


James Cameron Sounds the Alarm on Artificial Intelligence and Unveils a 'Terminator' for the 21st Century

#artificialintelligence

Thirty-three years after Arnold Schwarzenegger became an international star playing a killer robot sent from the future to kill the mother of the leader of a postapocalyptic rebellion, there have been four sequels (and one TV series), and the three films without the involvement of creator James Cameron have turned off fans and led the property to bounce from studio to studio and reboot to reboot. They assembled a writers room with scribes David Goyer, Charles Eglee, Josh Friedman and Justin Rhodes as well as Ellison, a lifelong Terminator fan (Cameron himself shows up once a week), and have crafted what they want to be a trilogy with Schwarzenegger, 70, and original star Linda Hamilton, 62, passing the torch to a young female lead. To unveil their plans and explain why the Terminator franchise is still relevant amid 21st century fears, Cameron, 63, and Miller, 47, joined The Hollywood Reporter's editorial director Matthew Belloni for a discussion Sept. 19 on the Paramount lot in Hollywood. Jim, has your opinion on this subject changed since you had the original idea for the Terminator story 35 years ago?


James Cameron brings Linda Hamilton back to the 'Terminator' franchise but snubs 'Wonder Woman' again

Los Angeles Times

Here's what's new and interesting in entertainment and the arts: Latin Grammy nominees announcement postponed after Mexico earthquake James Corden kind of regrets kissing Sean Spicer at the Emmys Jada Pinkett Smith shuts down Leah Remini's claims that she's a Scientologist Morrissey's new song, 'Spent the Day in Bed,' has some sage advice for our troubled times Kevin Hart's ex-wife renews claims about his'lies and infidelity' John Stamos, 'Weird Al' Yankovic will star in Hollywood Bowl's'Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory' Morrissey's new song, 'Spent the Day in Bed,' has some sage advice for our troubled times Kevin Hart's ex-wife renews claims about his'lies and infidelity' John Stamos, 'Weird Al' Yankovic will star in Hollywood Bowl's'Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory' James Cameron brings Linda Hamilton back to the'Terminator' franchise but snubs'Wonder Woman' again The original Sarah Connor, is back. Fans are going crazy at director James Cameron's announcement that Linda Hamilton, the first actor to portray the fan-favorite Connor in the "Terminator" franchise, will be returning to the world of killer robots. That said, Cameron is correct that in the world of "The Mummy" and the "Taken" franchise there certainly are a dearth of mature lead action stars portrayed by women. It is also poised to serve as the first film in a new trilogy within the "Terminator" world as Cameron revealed that they were actively searching for new "18-something woman" to be the "centerpiece" to the new series.


Recommended Reading: Hollywood is really mad at Rotten Tomatoes

Engadget

The New York Times takes a look at the rift the movie ratings site has created with its Tomatometer. I'd argue studios should stop blaming a website and just start making better movies, but what do I know. Facebook's Role in Trump's Win Is Clear. After its CEO claimed there's no way the site played a role in electing Trump, the facts say otherwise.


Mark Sagar Made a Baby in His Lab. Now It Plays the Piano

#artificialintelligence

At the University of Auckland, if you want to run hours upon hours of experiments on a baby trapped in a high chair, that's cool. When I visited the computer scientist's lab last year, BabyX was stuck inside a computer but could still see me sitting in front of the screen with her "father." Soul Machines wants to produce the first wave of likable, believable virtual assistants that work as customer service agents and breathe life into hunks of plastic such as Amazon.com's Companies with similar aspirations throughout Japan and the U.S. have produced a wide array of virtual avatars, assistants, and holograms. For a couple of years he used the creatures as the basis of a virtual assistant startup called Life F/X and had his faces read emails aloud.


How Artificial Intelligence Will Make Digital Humans Hollywood's New Stars

#artificialintelligence

But imagine if, instead, a computer could have stepped in, watched all of Walker's performances in the previous Furious films, learning the minute details of how he walked, talked and even raised an eyebrow. And then imagine that artificial intelligence took over and itself helped to create a digital performance for Walker's character. Potential AI-driven applications -- in which the machine takes over and can learn and think for itself -- could function as script supervisors, take a first pass at film editing, even create performances either for digital characters that resemble actual humans or more fantastic CG creatures. But, theoretically, AI could do the job of creating a digital "Paul Walker" faster and more economically than current methods.


Digital-humans-created-AI-dominate-Hollywood.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

The Digital Human League, for example, recently unveiled'Digital Mike' – an artificial likeness of producer Mike Seymour. The idea, Digital Mike explains in a promo video, is'to produce a virtual human, and not only a virtual human, but one rendered in real time – puppeteered or driven in real time, rendered in real time, and not only that, at 90 frames per second, in stereo, in VR.' In a new study, researchers from Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute, Yale University, and AI Impacts surveyed 352 machine learning experts to forecast the progress of AI in the next few decades. The idea, Digital Mike explains in a promo video, is'to produce a virtual human, and not only a virtual human, but one rendered in real time – puppeteered or driven in real time, rendered in real time, and not only that, at 90 frames per second, in stereo, in VR' A study from Oxford University's Future of Humanity Institute, Yale University, and AI Impacts released this past spring concluded that in less than 50 years, AI will beat humans at everything from language translation and truck driving to writing high-school essays.


How Rotten Tomatoes became Hollywood's most influential -- and feared -- website

Los Angeles Times

Rotten Tomatoes vice president Jeff Voris, middle, with senior editor Grae Drake, right, are filmed by creative director Jimmy Johenning at the Beverly Hills offices of the review aggregation website. Rotten Tomatoes vice president Jeff Voris, middle, with senior editor Grae Drake, right, are filmed by creative director Jimmy Johenning at the Beverly Hills offices of the review aggregation website. How Rotten Tomatoes became Hollywood's most influential -- and feared -- website On a recent Wednesday morning, the staff of Rotten Tomatoes gathers in a Beverly Hills office, laptops open -- steeling themselves for the next onslaught of reviews for Hollywood's biggest upcoming movies. That means the vast majority of critics liked the new 20th Century Fox movie -- and the $150-million "Apes" sequel gets the official "certified fresh" label on the movie-rating web site.


Hollywood's summer box-office lesson: 'The disconnect between critics and audiences is largely gone'

Los Angeles Times

But the movies that have earned virtually unanimous praise from critics -- including "Wonder Woman," "Baby Driver," "The Big Sick" and "Spider-Man: Homecoming" -- are the ones that are breaking out. "Getting off on the right foot is crucial and ... having a film that is critically well received makes it much easier for our message to cut through the clutter," said Adrian Smith, president of domestic distribution for Sony Pictures, which released "Spider-Man: Homecoming" and "Baby Driver."