Health & Medicine


Kraft: Healthcare data-flow of the future will be fluid, proactive, and personalized

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Dr. Daniel Kraft, a Stanford-educated MD who now serves as chair of medicine for Singularity University, a learning community founded by Ray Kurzweil and Peter Diamandis, sees himself as one of those leaders. Kraft will be sharing his observations, predictions, and advice at Health 2.0's Annual Fall Conference in two weeks in Santa Clara, California. "The bottom line is that for the last nine years I've had an interesting journey doing medicine for Singularity University and started this program called Exponential Medicine, which in its essence is that the future of health and medicine isn't digital, mobile, connected health, or AI," Kraft told MobiHealthNews. Click here to register for Health 2.0's Annual Fall Conference.]


AI's potential in the pharma life cycle - PMLiVE

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From the acceleration of regulatory submissions - by identifying data gaps that have led to delays or rejections in the past - to the transformation of the conduct of clinical trials and patient safety monitoring, artificial intelligence (AI) has substantial potential to change the way life sciences organisations operate. Back-end technology already exists to facilitate more intelligent and proactive health monitoring by taking things forward as drug companies rely on finding the optimum ways for patients to interact with and use the tools. There is also important safety monitoring potential and drug feedback potential, as long as intelligent tools based on AI and machine learning are in the background offering companies what to look for and ways of deciphering what it all means. As more and more companies identify opportunities to turn AI-enabled insights into timely and beneficial outcomes - whether by accelerating market entry, successfully mining social media for potential adverse events and other patient feedback, discovering new indications, or improving the manufacturing and supply chain process - advanced automation through increased machine intelligence looks set to be the way forward.


A Solution to Missing Data: Imputation Using R

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If the missing values are not MAR or MCAR then they fall into the third category of missing values known as Not Missing At Random, otherwise abbreviated as NMAR. The package provides four different methods to impute values with the default model being linear regression for continuous variables and logistic regression for categorical variables. In R, I will use the NHANES dataset (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data by the US National Center for Health Statistics). The NHANES data is a small dataset of 25 observations, each having 4 features - age, bmi, hypertension status and cholesterol level.


Deep Learning Prerequisites: Linear Regression in Python

@machinelearnbot

This course teaches you about one popular technique used in machine learning, data science and statistics: linear regression. Linear regression is the simplest machine learning model you can learn, yet there is so much depth that you'll be returning to it for years to come. We will apply multi-dimensional linear regression to predicting a patient's systolic blood pressure given their age and weight. If you want more than just a superficial look at machine learning models, this course is for you.


Pfizer, Veritas, MGH Join Xconomy's Healthcare A.I. Conference on Nov. 2 Xconomy

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The half-day conference, called Healthcare A.I., is happening at Pfizer's offices in Cambridge, MA, and you can still snag a ticket here. We're hard at work on the agenda, but here are some of the key speakers: Esther Dyson, chairman of EDventure Holdings, who is focusing on health and wellness Mirza Cifric, founder and CEO of Veritas Genetics Jessica Zeaske, director of healthcare investments, GE Ventures Dan Karlin, head of experimental medicine, informatics, and regulatory strategy, Pfizer Innovative Research Lab Mark Michalski, executive director of the MGH and BWH Center for Clinical Data Science Charles Koontz, president and CEO of GE Healthcare IT Shahram Ebadollahi, chief science officer, IBM Watson Health Iya Khalil, co-founder and chief commercial officer of GNS Healthcare Jamie Goldstein, founder and partner, Pillar VC Andrew Beck, co-founder and CEO of PathAI Shilpa Lawande, co-founder and CEO of Postscript.us These leaders will discuss how they are using (and investing in) A.I.-related technologies and data-driven approaches to help solve big problems in medicine and healthcare. What's at stake is nothing less than the future of a trillion-dollar industry and the well-being of humans in the age of increasingly intelligent machines. Gregory T. Huang is Xconomy's Deputy Editor, National IT Editor, and Editor of Xconomy Boston.


Doctor Hazel, an AI aimed at skin cancer detection, is latest in a long line

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Engineers participating in a hackathon last weekend demonstrated an artificial intelligence that they say could someday detect cancerous moles, TechCrunch reports. Apps, mobile platforms, and camera devices designed to evaluate moles and estimate skin cancer risk have a long history filled with successes and failures. That same year, University of Michigan Health System physicians launched UMSkinCheck featuring reminders and instructions for patients to self-examine their moles and skin lesions over time. The FTC alleged that the marketers of both mole photography-based apps "deceptively claimed the apps accurately analyzed melanoma risk," and that the marketers had insufficient evidence to make these claims.


Blockchain Powered AI Doctors to Revolutionize Medicine

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Furthermore, through machine learning, the data collected will be analyzed and processed in order to provide personalized feedback to users about their own medical issues. The intermingling of the burgeoning technology of Artificial Intelligence and equally revolutionary Blockchain has seen Doc.ai's team propose their platform can answer personal medical questions - from masses of data collected - at a touch of a button. "We are making it possible for lab tests to converse directly with patients by leveraging advanced artificial intelligence, medical data forensics, and the decentralized Blockchain. The details of this platform may sound a lot like science fiction, but it is essentially the manipulation of data which is analyzed by machine learning, to provide medical answers.


Deep Learning Explained - in 4 Simple Facts -- Steemit

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Machine learning, as we previously examined, consists of a machine learning from experience, by perfecting a model it forms after doing a task over and over again. Try running a Deep Learning algorithm on a low end machine, and see how fast it crashes… and possibly burns. On a data level, Deep Learning performs at its best when it has huge volumes of data to analyze. Whereas Machine Learning allows a machine to simply learn, this paradigm has given birth to systems with capabilities better than those of humans.


Flipboard on Flipboard

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An attempt will be made to find how to make machines use language, form abstractions and concepts, solve kinds of problems now reserved for humans, and improve themselves." They left out the most important part of building intelligent machines, the intelligence … before we attempt to build intelligent machines we have to first understand how the brain things, and there is nothing artificial about that." If intelligence was a cake, unsupervised learning would be the cake, supervised learning would be the icing on the cake, and reinforcement learning would be the cherry on the cake. We need to solve the unsupervised learning problem before we can even think of getting to true AI."


Forget Police Sketches: Researchers Perfectly Reconstruct Faces by Reading Brainwaves

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Using brain scans and direct neuron recording from macaque monkeys, the team found specialized "face patches" that respond to specific combinations of facial features. In the early 2000s, while recording from epilepsy patients with electrodes implanted into their brains, Quian Quiroga and colleagues found that face cells are particularly picky. In a stroke of luck, Tsao and team blew open the "black box" of facial recognition while working on a different problem: how to describe a face mathematically, with a matrix of numbers. In macaque monkeys with electrodes implanted into their brains, the team recorded from three "face patches"--brain areas that respond especially to faces--while showing the monkeys the computer-generated faces.