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IBM's Revolutionary New Machine Learning/Big Data Platform.

@machinelearnbot

In our opinion, though there was a much more significant announcement made by IBM when they officially set up the first IBM Watson Data platform which puts machine learning, big data analysis, and AI-powered analysis into the hands of everyday users and developers. According to IBM, anyone including those who have not studied/used/or even know about machine learning will be able to use its platform to optimize their services across a wide range of industries and train their own AI. This platform is powered by IBM's Watson AI, which is the company's flagship brand under which it has done some truly pioneering things over the last few years. Now, by opening up this raw computing power to companies of all sizes, including the smallest developers, IBM is hoping that a new wave of creative solutions will come to market. Facebook and Microsoft have for example been pushing'bots' which use the power of AI but as a development standard on which to build something for a particular platform.


How Deep Neural Networks Work and How We Put Them to Work at Facebook

@machinelearnbot

I love solving puzzles and building things. Practicing data science gives me the opportunity to do both in equal measure. Like most data scientists, I came to the field indirectly. I started by studying robotics and human rehabilitation at MIT (MS '99, PhD '02), moved on to machine vision and machine learning at Sandia National Laboratories, then to predictive modeling of agriculture DuPont Pioneer, to cloud data science at Microsoft, and finally to satellite image processing at Facebook. In my spare time I like to rock climb, write robot learning algorithms, and go on walks with my wife and our dog, Reign of Terror.


Bizarre $2100 Youbionic arm will give you two extra hands

Daily Mail

If you've ever dreamed of becoming a multi armed cyborg, then a new firm could have the perfect product for you. Youbionic claims the bizarre contraption can give you'extraordinary abilities.' Controlled by moving your fingers, it can open and close, and its makers say it will let you easily grip objects. It is controlled using small sensors in the fingers, and a demonstration video shows it pinching and gripping, with each finger moving independently. It is controlled using small sensors in the fingers, and a demonstration video shows it pinching and gripping, with each finger moving independently.


Elon Musk says we only have 10% chance of making AI safe

Daily Mail

Elon Musk has been very vocal about his concerns over artificial intelligence, and now the Tesla and SpaceX CEO has quantified his worries. In a recent talk, Musk claimed that efforts to make AI safe only have'a five to 10 per cent chance of success.' The warning comes shortly after Musk claimed that regulation of artificial intelligence was drastically needed because it's a'fundamental risk to the existence of human civilisation.' Elon Musk has been very vocal about his concerns over artificial intelligence, and now the Tesla and SpaceX CEO has quantified his worries. In a recent talk, Musk claimed that efforts to make AI safe only have'a five to 10 per cent chance of success' Elon Musk's latest company Neuralink is working to link the human brain with a machine interface by creating micron-sized devices.


Robots May Make Radiologists' Jobs Easier, Not Redundant

Wall Street Journal

In fact, they ought to be relieved: AI is more likely to make their jobs easier than redundant. Machine learning, the latest iteration of AI, can sift through that data and spot patterns humans might miss. But machines don't know what to do with that information--at least not yet. In recent decades, the volume of medical images has skyrocketed, reflecting growing patient loads, more types of scans and the number of images each exam produces. CT scans that once captured one dimension of the body can now capture all three, generating hundreds or even thousands of highly detailed images.


Tech-savvy Chinese farmers use drones to spray pesticide

Daily Mail

Farmers in China have caught up with the country's booming drone trend and started using unmanned aircraft to spray pesticide onto the fields. Not only that, a team of villagers in central China recently bought 30 of these bug-zapping vehicles in hope of turning it into a new business. Zhu Xiwang and his neighbours said they hoped their squad of agri-drones to could help them start a pest-killing service, according to Huanqiu.com, an affiliation to People's Daily Online. This £24.8K flat pack folding home takes just SIX HOURS to build Pictures show the 30 drones lining up on a field, ready to take off. The unmanned aircraft, known by its model name MG-1S, is produced by Shenzhen-based Da Jiang Innovation, one of the largest drone manufacturers in China.


Google's search algorithm struggles to rank information

Daily Mail

With millions of views published online every day, it can be difficult for Google to rank information correctly within its search engine. Speaking this week, Eric Schmidt, Chairman of Google's parent firm, Alphabet, explained that it is'very difficult' for the search algorithm to weed out the truth in a sea of opposing articles. Thankfully, Schmidt believes the problem should be easy to address by tweaking the algorithm. Speaking this week, Eric Schmidt, Chairman of Google's parent firm, Alphabet, explained that it is'very difficult' for the search algorithm to weed out the truth in a sea of opposing articles Inaccurate results are often down to "Google bombing" used by groups to be ranked highly. These include linking to a fake news site from several other sources and hiding text on a page that is invisible to humans but visible to the search engine's algorithms.


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USATODAY

Robot Turtles is a board game for ages 4 and up that beautifully demonstrates the basics of coding. A link has been posted to your Facebook feed. Robot Turtles is a board game for ages 4 and up that beautifully demonstrates the basics of coding.


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#artificialintelligence

Movie history is filled with computers that make us miserable. Unlike today's computers that make our lives dreadful, like the little ones in our pockets eager to sell out our privacy for a nickel, or crash when we need them most, yesterday's computers were their own character in each film. Everyone knows how rude HAL got at the end of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). In The Aries Computer (1972, a mysterious Vincent Price film that may have not been filmed or released, part of the Zodiac series) the reported plot was this: It's 2013 and a supercomputer named Aries has become a ruling force, and humans need to figure out how to take their power back. Later came films like Terminator (1984), with it's hive-mind Skynet keeping humans under its virtual thumb.


5 professions that could see significant growth with the rise of AI

#artificialintelligence

The words "artificial intelligence" often conjure up a sense of fear and apprehension. Fear for the unknown possibilities of AI, fear for the AI-fueled dystopian images brought about by movies like The Terminator, and most practically, fear for the possibility that AI will someday take our jobs. This fear is neither new nor totally unfounded. As with any disruptive technological invention, faster, more efficient machines are bound to replace human workers. However, those who fear AI will take their jobs can rest a little easier knowing they will at least have the potential to find a new job.