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Inside Microsoft's AI Comeback

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But while his peer scientists Yann LeCun and Geoffrey Hinton have signed on to Facebook and Google, respectively, Bengio, 53, has chosen to continue working from his small third-floor office on the hilltop campus of the University of Montreal. Shum, who is in charge of all of AI and research at Microsoft, has just finished a dress rehearsal for next week's Build developers conference, and he wants to show me demos. Shum has spent the past several years helping his boss, CEO Satya Nadella, make good on his promise to remake Microsoft around artificial intelligence. Bill Gates showed off a mapping technology in 1998, for example, but it never came to market; Google launched Maps in 2005.


Microsoft Infuses SQL Server With Artificial Intelligence

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SQL Server 2017, which will run on both Windows and Linux, is inching closer to release with a set of artificial intelligence capabilities that will change the way enterprises derive value from their business data, according to Microsoft. The Redmond, Wash., software giant on April 19 released SQL Server 2017 Community Technology Preview (CTP) 2.0. Joseph Sirosh, corporate vice president of the Microsoft Data Group, described the "production-quality" database software as "the first RDBMS [relational database management system] with built-in AI." Download links and instructions on installing the preview on Linux are available in this TechNet post from the SQL Server team at Microsoft. It's no secret to anyone keeping tabs on Microsoft lately that the company is betting big on AI, progressively baking its machine learning and cognitive computing technologies into a wide array of the company's cloud services, business software offerings and consumer products. "In this preview release, we are introducing in-database support for a rich library of machine learning functions, and now for the first time Python support (in addition to R)," stated Sirosh, in the April 19 announcement.


Facebook's Caffe2 AI tools come to iPhone, Android, and Raspberry Pi

PCWorld

New intelligence can be added to mobile devices like the iPhone, Android devices, and low-power computers like Raspberry Pi with Facebook's new open-source Caffe2 deep-learning framework. Caffe2 can be used to program artificial intelligence features into smartphones and tablets, allowing them to recognize images, video, text, and speech and be more situationally aware. It's important to note that Caffe2 is not an AI program, but a tool allowing AI to be programmed into smartphones. It takes just a few lines of code to write learning models, which can then be bundled into apps. The release of Caffe2 is significant.


What is AI? Even Elon Musk Can't Explain

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Word leaked Monday via The Wall Street Journal that Tesla / SpaceX industrialist Elon Musk has been funding a company called Neuralink-- allegedly with some of his own money -- attempting to connect computers directly into human brains. This is the same Musk profiled in this month's Vanity Fair, where he tells journalist Maureen Dowd in all seriousness that humanity needs a Mars colony to which we can escape'if AI goes rogue and turns on humanity." In short, Musk is one of many big thinkers who believe a human-computer hybrid is essential to allowing humans to keep their own machines from marginalizing them. Neuralink's technology is said to be a neural lace, which Musk has spoken about for over a year. But for most people, the first question isn't whether artificial intelligence will usurp our planet.


What's Machine Learning? It's Expensive, Slow and Exclusive -- For Now

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AI and NLP are two acronyms many in the world of chatbots toss around glibly, sometimes without understanding themselves what these terms mean. There's a third acronym that's an essential component beneath these two: ML, which stands for machine learning. Machine learning is a lot easier to explain in one tweet than AI or NLP: It's the process by which an advanced software system trains itself from a massive set of examples, rather than being explicitly programmed with rigid algorithms devised by human coders. Over time, it gets better and better as it acquires more data to train on. An ML system is still programmed with standard one-and-zero logic, but it's programmed to modify its behavior to meet specified goals based on patterns it discovers in the sample data.


*Applause* YouTube's caption upgrade shows how machine learning is helping the disabled

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FCC rules require TV stations to provide closed captions that convey speech, sound effects, and audience reactions such as laughter to deaf and hard of hearing viewers. YouTube isn't subject to those rules, but thanks to Google's machine-learning technology, it now offers similar assistance. YouTube has used speech-to-text software to automatically caption speech in videos since 2009 (they are used 15 million times a day). Today it rolled out algorithms that indicate applause, laughter, and music in captions. More sounds could follow, since the underlying software can also identify noises like sighs, barks, and knocks.


*Applause* YouTube's caption upgrade shows how machine learning is helping the disabled

#artificialintelligence

FCC rules require TV stations to provide closed captions that convey speech, sound effects, and audience reactions such as laughter to deaf and hard of hearing viewers. YouTube isn't subject to those rules, but thanks to Google's machine-learning technology, it now offers similar assistance. YouTube has used speech-to-text software to automatically caption speech in videos since 2009 (they are used 15 million times a day). Today it rolled out algorithms that indicate applause, laughter, and music in captions. More sounds could follow, since the underlying software can also identify noises like sighs, barks, and knocks.


*Applause* YouTube's caption upgrade shows how machine learning is helping the disabled

#artificialintelligence

FCC rules require TV stations to provide closed captions that convey speech, sound effects, and audience reactions such as laughter to deaf and hard of hearing viewers. YouTube isn't subject to those rules, but thanks to Google's machine-learning technology, it now offers similar assistance. YouTube has used speech-to-text software to automatically caption speech in videos since 2009 (they are used 15 million times a day). Today it rolled out algorithms that indicate applause, laughter, and music in captions. More sounds could follow, since the underlying software can also identify noises like sighs, barks, and knocks.


*Applause* YouTube's caption upgrade shows how machine learning is helping the disabled

#artificialintelligence

FCC rules require TV stations to provide closed captions that convey speech, sound effects, and audience reactions such as laughter to deaf and hard of hearing viewers. YouTube isn't subject to those rules, but thanks to Google's machine-learning technology, it now offers similar assistance. YouTube has used speech-to-text software to automatically caption speech in videos since 2009 (they are used 15 million times a day). Today it rolled out algorithms that indicate applause, laughter, and music in captions. More sounds could follow, since the underlying software can also identify noises like sighs, barks, and knocks.


*Applause* YouTube's caption upgrade shows how machine learning is helping the disabled

#artificialintelligence

FCC rules require TV stations to provide closed captions that convey speech, sound effects, and audience reactions such as laughter to deaf and hard of hearing viewers. YouTube isn't subject to those rules, but thanks to Google's machine-learning technology, it now offers similar assistance. YouTube has used speech-to-text software to automatically caption speech in videos since 2009 (they are used 15 million times a day). Today it rolled out algorithms that indicate applause, laughter, and music in captions. More sounds could follow, since the underlying software can also identify noises like sighs, barks, and knocks.