Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


AI 'lawyer' correctly predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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Researchers from the University of Sheffield, the University of Pennsylvania and University College London programmed the machine to analyse text from cases heard at the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) and predict the outcome of the judicial decision. "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but we think they'd find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," explained Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science. The team of computer and legal scientists extracted case information published by the ECtHR in their openly accessible database. The researchers identified English language data sets for 584 cases relating to Articles 3, 6 and 8 of the Convention and applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text.


Predicting judicial decisions of the European Court of Human Rights: a Natural Language Processing perspective

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In this paper, our particular focus is on the automatic analysis of cases of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR or Court). Our task is to predict whether a particular Article of the Convention has been violated, given textual evidence extracted from a case, which comprises of specific parts pertaining to the facts, the relevant applicable law and the arguments presented by the parties involved. Accordingly, in the discussion we highlight ways in which automatically predicting the outcomes of ECtHR cases could potentially provide insights on whether judges follow a so-called legal model (Grey, 1983) of decision making or their behavior conforms to the legal realists' theorization (Leiter, 2007), according to which judges primarily decide cases by responding to the stimulus of the facts of the case. It can also be used to develop prior indicators for diagnosing potential violations of specific Articles in lodged applications and eventually prioritise the decision process on cases where violation seems very likely.


AI judge predicts outcome of human rights cases with remarkable accuracy

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An artificial intelligence algorithm has predicted the outcome of human rights trials with 79 percent accuracy, according to a study published today in PeerJ Computer Science. Developed by researchers from the University College London (UCL), the University of Sheffield, and the University of Pennsylvania, the system is the first of its kind trained solely on case text from a major international court, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). "Our motivation was twofold," co-author Vasileios Lampos of UCL Computer Science told Digital Trends. The algorithm analyzed texts from nearly 600 cases related to human right's issues including fair trials, torture, and privacy in an effort to identify patterns.


AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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The judicial decisions of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) have been predicted to 79% accuracy using an artificial intelligence (AI) method developed by researchers at UCL, the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania. It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights," explained Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science. "Ideally, we'd test and refine our algorithm using the applications made to the court rather than the published judgements, but without access to that data we rely on the court-published summaries of these submissions," explained co-author, Dr Vasileios Lampos, UCL Computer Science. They identified English language data sets for 584 cases relating to Articles 3, 6 and 8* of the Convention and applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text.


Artificial Intelligence Predicts Outcomes of Human Rights Trials –

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Using Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine learning technology, a team of researchers has predicted outcomes in judicial decisions at the European Court of Human Rights (EctHR) with 79 per cent accuracy. The AI method, developed by researchers from University College London (UCL), University of Sheffield and US-based University of Pennsylvania is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm. The team along with Daniel Preotiuc-Pietro from University of Pennsylvania extracted case information published by the ECtHR in their publically accessible database. They identified English language data sets for 584 cases applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text.


British scientists have developed an 'AI judge'

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A team of researchers in the UK have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) program that can predict the outcome of human rights cases involving torture, degrading treatment, and privacy. The AI -- developed by researchers at University College London (UCL) and the University of Sheffield, alongside Dr Daniel Preo?iuc-Pietro from the University of Pennsylvania -- successfully predicted the verdicts for 79% of 584 cases at the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). "We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers, but we think they'd find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," said Dr Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL Computer Science, in a statement. "Previous studies have predicted outcomes based on the nature of the crime, or the policy position of each judge, so this is the first time judgments have been predicted using analysis of text prepared by the court," said co-author, Dr Vasileios Lampos, also from UCL Computer Science, in a statement.


Now, Artificial Intelligence can predict outcomes of human rights trials - The Economic Times

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LONDON: Using Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine learning technology, a team of researchers has predicted outcomes in judicial decisions at the European Court of Human Rights (EctHR) with 79 per cent accuracy. The AI method, developed by researchers from University College London (UCL), University of Sheffield and US-based University of Pennsylvania is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm. The team along with Daniel Preotiuc-Pietro from University of Pennsylvania extracted case information published by the ECtHR in their publically accessible database. They identified English language data sets for 584 cases applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text.


Artificial Intelligence predicts outcomes of human rights trials

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London, Oct 24 (IANS) Using Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine learning technology, a team of researchers has predicted outcomes in judicial decisions at the European Court of Human Rights (EctHR) with 79 per cent accuracy. The AI method, developed by researchers from University College London (UCL), University of Sheffield and US-based University of Pennsylvania is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm. The team along with Daniel Preotiuc-Pietro from University of Pennsylvania extracted case information published by the ECtHR in their publically accessible database. They identified English language data sets for 584 cases applied an AI algorithm to find patterns in the text.