Cybersecurity


Mark Cuban: Invest in AI or Get Left Behind

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About 4,000 people listened to Cuban as he kicked off his shoes--literally--and explained how AI will change the game for companies, educators, and future developments. He's also keeping his eyes peeled for smaller companies in machine learning and AI, and already has at least three companies in his investment portfolio. "[Software writing] skill sets won't be nearly as valuable as being able to take a liberal arts education … and applying those [skills] in assisting and developing networks." But in order for the country to advance to that future, AI and robotics need to become core competencies in the U.S., and not just in the business world, Cuban said.


AI: The promise and the peril

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The forecast is not all gloomy – artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML) and automation are also expected to create jobs that will likely be much more interesting and creative than the repetitive tasks of the industrial age. According to Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at MIT and co-director of the university's Initiative on the Digital Economy (IDE), AI amounts to, "the largest disruption in labor and the way we work," in generations. But as Joi Ito, director of the MIT Media Lab and moderator of a panel titled, "Putting AI to Work," put it, the fear that machines will become smarter than humans and take over the world is tempered by the reality that "they're stupid and they've already taken over the world." Seth Earley, CEO of Earley Information Science, while agreeing there will be, "an enormous amount of disruption," from AI, was more optimistic about retraining for the jobs of the future.


Q&A: How artificial intelligence is changing the nature of cybersecurity

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With the rise of cloud-based apps and the proliferation of mobile devices, information security is becoming a top priority for both the IT department and the C-Suite. Businesses ranging from startups to large corporations are increasingly looking to new technologies, like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, to protect their consumers. For cybersecurity, AI can analyze vast amounts of data and help cybersecurity professionals identify more threats than would be possible if left to do it manually. But the same technology that can improve corporate defences can also be used to attack them.


Q&A: How artificial intelligence is changing the nature of cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

With the rise of cloud-based apps and the proliferation of mobile devices, information security is becoming a top priority for both the IT department and the C-Suite. Businesses ranging from startups to large corporations are increasingly looking to new technologies, like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, to protect their consumers. For cybersecurity, AI can analyze vast amounts of data and help cybersecurity professionals identify more threats than would be possible if left to do it manually. But the same technology that can iimprove corporate defences can also be used to attack them.


Artificial intelligence-powered malware is coming, and it's going to be terrifying

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Artificial intelligence will open the door to ever-more devastating attacks -- but the most effective ones may be the most subtle, Darktrace's Dave Palmer says. Imagine you've got a meeting with a client, and shortly before you leave, they send you over a confirmation and a map with directions to where you're planning to meet. It all looks normal -- but the entire message was actually written by a piece of smart malware mimicking the client's email mannerisms, with a virus attached to the map. It sounds pretty far out -- and it is, for now. But that's the direction that Dave Palmer, director of technology at cybersecurity firm Darktrace, thinks the arms race between hackers and security firms is heading.


Why Artificial Intelligence will be the Future of Cybersecurity?

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In cybersecurity, Artificial Intelligence (AI) is implemented through Machine Learning techniques. The Machine Learning algorithms allow computers to learn and make predictions based on data already known. When we talk about Artificial Intelligence, people often refer to a world dominated by robots in a science fiction universe. But Artificial Intelligence is rooted in reality and is already used in many fields, such as online shopping, surveillance systems and many others. Artificial Intelligence has already proven effective in the treatment of millions of malware every day.


4 ways man and machine are teaming up to fight cyberthreats

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With the use of data-centric business models and big data services on the rise, it is becoming increasingly harder to detect threats and data breaches. Cybersecurity experts are finding themselves hard pressed to keep tabs on the reams of data that are being generated by their companies and organizations. Attackers on the other hand are finding it easier to hide their malicious packets in the flood of data that is being exchanged over corporate networks. Gary Vaynerchuk was so impressed with TNW Conference 2016 he paused mid-talk to applaud us. And with a widening talent gap plaguing the cybersecurity industry, there's no sign of the odds tipping in favor of IT security any time soon.


IDG Connect Artificial Intelligence in the workplace: Timesaving, chatbots & security

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Artificial Intelligence is a buzzword that is impossible to ignore in the world of technology. However, not all talk about the area has been positive. Many believe that, in the foreseeable future, AI computer systems will match human intelligence and may even be better at certain tasks. This introduces the fear that the technology could even replace mankind. While there's certainly no denying that AI is a force to be reckoned with, we're still relatively far from this outcome.


IBM is #1 on U.S. Patent List in 2016

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ARMONK, N.Y. - 09 Jan 2017: IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced that it broke the U.S. patent record with 8,088 patents granted to its inventors in 2016, marking the 24th consecutive year of innovation leadership. IBM's 2016 patent output covers a diverse range of inventions in artificial intelligence and cognitive computing, cognitive health, cloud, cybersecurity and other strategic growth areas for the company. "Leading the world in innovation for 24 years in a row is a result of IBM's unmatched commitment to innovation and R&D–reflected in this year's new U.S. patent record, breaking the 8,000 barrier for the first time," said Ginni Rometty, IBM's chairman, president and CEO. "We are deeply proud of our inventors' unique contributions to discovery, science and technology that are driving progress across business and society and opening the new era of cognitive business." More than 8,500 IBM inventors residing in 47 states and territories and 47 countries are responsible for IBM's record-setting 2016 patent tally.


2017 tech trends: 'A major bank will fail' - BBC News

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If 2016 seemed politically tumultuous, 2017 promises to be equally tumultuous on the technology front. The pace of change is accelerating at a dizzying rate, with profound implications for the way we work, play and communicate. So what are the big technology trends to watch out for in 2017? Cybersecurity will undoubtedly be the dominant theme of 2017, as all tech innovations could be undermined by data thefts, fraud and cyber propaganda. Forget Kim Kardashian, it's hacking that could break the internet - and much more besides.