Cybersecurity


Mark Cuban: Invest in AI or Get Left Behind

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About 4,000 people listened to Cuban as he kicked off his shoes--literally--and explained how AI will change the game for companies, educators, and future developments. He's also keeping his eyes peeled for smaller companies in machine learning and AI, and already has at least three companies in his investment portfolio. "[Software writing] skill sets won't be nearly as valuable as being able to take a liberal arts education … and applying those [skills] in assisting and developing networks." But in order for the country to advance to that future, AI and robotics need to become core competencies in the U.S., and not just in the business world, Cuban said.


AI: The promise and the peril

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The forecast is not all gloomy – artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML) and automation are also expected to create jobs that will likely be much more interesting and creative than the repetitive tasks of the industrial age. According to Andrew McAfee, principal research scientist at MIT and co-director of the university's Initiative on the Digital Economy (IDE), AI amounts to, "the largest disruption in labor and the way we work," in generations. But as Joi Ito, director of the MIT Media Lab and moderator of a panel titled, "Putting AI to Work," put it, the fear that machines will become smarter than humans and take over the world is tempered by the reality that "they're stupid and they've already taken over the world." Seth Earley, CEO of Earley Information Science, while agreeing there will be, "an enormous amount of disruption," from AI, was more optimistic about retraining for the jobs of the future.


Q&A: How artificial intelligence is changing the nature of cybersecurity

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With the rise of cloud-based apps and the proliferation of mobile devices, information security is becoming a top priority for both the IT department and the C-Suite. Businesses ranging from startups to large corporations are increasingly looking to new technologies, like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, to protect their consumers. For cybersecurity, AI can analyze vast amounts of data and help cybersecurity professionals identify more threats than would be possible if left to do it manually. But the same technology that can improve corporate defences can also be used to attack them.


Q&A: How artificial intelligence is changing the nature of cybersecurity

#artificialintelligence

With the rise of cloud-based apps and the proliferation of mobile devices, information security is becoming a top priority for both the IT department and the C-Suite. Businesses ranging from startups to large corporations are increasingly looking to new technologies, like artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, to protect their consumers. For cybersecurity, AI can analyze vast amounts of data and help cybersecurity professionals identify more threats than would be possible if left to do it manually. But the same technology that can iimprove corporate defences can also be used to attack them.


Artificial intelligence-powered malware is coming, and it's going to be terrifying

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Artificial intelligence will open the door to ever-more devastating attacks -- but the most effective ones may be the most subtle, Darktrace's Dave Palmer says. Imagine you've got a meeting with a client, and shortly before you leave, they send you over a confirmation and a map with directions to where you're planning to meet. It all looks normal -- but the entire message was actually written by a piece of smart malware mimicking the client's email mannerisms, with a virus attached to the map. It sounds pretty far out -- and it is, for now. But that's the direction that Dave Palmer, director of technology at cybersecurity firm Darktrace, thinks the arms race between hackers and security firms is heading.


The Deep Learning Market Map: 60 Startups Working Across E-Commerce, Cybersecurity, Sales, And More

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New York-based Calrifai -- backed by investors including Google Ventures, Lux Capital, and NVidia -- entered the R/GA accelerator this year, after raising $10M in Series A in Q2'15. BI, Sales & CRM: Applications here include voice analytics to extract information from calls, automated customer response solutions, business data analytics, and sales targeting. To name a few, Palo Alto-based Mariana raised $2M in seed money from investors including Blumberg Capital; London-based True AI, previously seed funded by Entrepreneur First, entered the Microsoft Ventures Accelerator in Q3'16; another UK-based startup, Ripjar, raised funds from Winton Ventures in Q2'16. Three startups in the private sector using AI in e-commerce raised funding rounds this year: Reflektion raised $18M in Q1'16 from investors including Intel Capital, Battery Ventures, and Marc Benioff; ViSenze raised $10.5M in Series B from investors including Rakuten Ventures, Enspire Capital, and Phillip Private Equity; India-based Staqu raised angel funds in Q2'16.


The Deep Learning Market Map: 60 Startups Working Across E-Commerce, Cybersecurity, Sales, And More

#artificialintelligence

New York-based Calrifai -- backed by investors including Google Ventures, Lux Capital, and NVidia -- entered the R/GA accelerator this year, after raising 10M in Series A in Q2'15. BI, Sales & CRM: Applications here include voice analytics to extract information from calls, automated customer response solutions, business data analytics, and sales targeting. To name a few, Palo Alto-based Mariana raised 2M in seed money from investors including Blumberg Capital; London-based True AI, previously seed funded by Entrepreneur First, entered the Microsoft Ventures Accelerator in Q3'16; another UK-based startup, Ripjar, raised funds from Winton Ventures in Q2'16. Three startups in the private sector using AI in e-commerce raised funding rounds this year: Reflektion raised 18M in Q1'16 from investors including Intel Capital, Battery Ventures, and Marc Benioff; ViSenze raised 10.5M in Series B from investors including Rakuten Ventures, Enspire Capital, and Phillip Private Equity; India-based Staqu raised angel funds in Q2'16.


Exploiting machine learning in cybersecurity

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MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) has led one of the most notable efforts in this regard, developing a system called AI2, an adaptive cybersecurity platform that uses machine learning and the assistance of expert analysts to adapt and improve over time. The system uses near-real-time analytics to identify known security threats, stored data analytics to compare samples against historical data and big data analytics to identify evolving threats through anonymized datasets gathered from a vast number of clients. Combining this capability with the data already being gathered by IBM's threat intelligence platform, X-Force Exchange, the company wants to address the shortage of talent in the industry by raising Watson's level of efficiency to that of an expert assistant and help reduce the rate of false positives. This technique gives the cybersecurity firm the unique ability to monitor billions of results on a daily basis, identify and alert about the publication of potentially brand-damaging information and proactively detect and prevent attacks and data loss before they happen.


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Machine learning and AI could be the key to protecting enterprise IT from advancing cybersecurity threats, Cylance CEO Stuart McClure said on Tuesday. McClure's company, which bills itself as "advanced threat protection for the endpoint," uses machine learning to analyze massive amounts of data in an organization and classifies that data automatically. Cylance, in offering breach protection, is often confused with legacy anti-virus software, McClure said. The US Office of Personnel Management (OPM) eventually brought Cylance in to help them work on the early days of what would eventually be determined to be a massive breach.


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It feels like the barbarians are continually at the gate. We can't seem to go more than a week before a new data breach is in the news, impacting potentially millions of individuals. The targets range from companies like Omni Hotels, which had been breached affecting up to 50,000 customers whose personal and credit card information was exposed, to North Carolina State University, where over 38,000 students' personal information, including their SSNs, were at risk. As I mentioned in a recent blog'Internet of Things and Big Data - who owns your data?', we have been storing our personal and credit card information in a variety of systems, credit card companies, banks, online retailers, hotels - and that's just naming a few. The information in those systems is more valuable than gold to the hackers.