Civil Rights & Constitutional Law


tencent-qq-messaging-app-kills-unpatriotic-chatbots

Engadget

A popular Chinese messaging app had to pull down two chatbots, not because they turned into racist and sexist bots like Microsoft's Tay and Zo did, but because they became unpatriotic. According to Financial Times, they began spewing out responses that could be interpreted as anti-China or anti-Communist Party. While these responses may seem like they can't hold a candle to Tay's racist and sexist tweets, they're the worst responses a chatbot could serve up in China. Tay, for instance, learned so much filth from Twitter that Microsoft had to pull it down after only 24 hours.


Banned In China: Why Live Streaming Video Has Been Censored

International Business Times

A recent ban affecting three of China's biggest online platforms aimed at "cleaning up the air in cyberspace" is just the latest government crackdown on user-generated content, and especially live streaming. This edict, issued by China's State Administration of Press, Publication, Radio, Film and Television (SAPPRFT) in June, affects video on the social media platform Sina Weibo, as well as video platforms Ifeng and AcFun. In 2014, for example, one of China's biggest online video platforms LETV began removing its app that allowed TV users to access online video, reportedly due to SAPPRFT requirements. China's largest social media network, Sina Weibo, launched an app named Yi Zhibo in 2016 that allows live streaming of games, talent shows and news.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

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By keeping ISPs and websites under threat of closure, the government is able to leverage that additional labor force to help monitor a larger population than it would otherwise be able to. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers that enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, professor of law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. "Context is crucial to many free-speech questions like whether a threat amounts to a true threat and whether a person is a limited-purpose public figure," professor Keats Citron told Engadget.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

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According to a 2016 report from internet liberty watchdog, Freedom House, two-thirds of all internet users reside in countries where criticism of the ruling administration is censored -- 27 percent of them live in nations where posting, sharing or supporting unpopular opinions on social media can get you arrested. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers which enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. "Context is crucial to many free speech questions like whether a threat amounts to a true threat and whether a person is a limited purpose public figure," Professor Keats Citron told Engadget.


How artificial intelligence can be corrupted to repress free speech

Engadget

According to a 2016 report from internet liberty watchdog, Freedom House, two-thirds of all internet users reside in countries where criticism of the ruling administration is censored -- 27 percent of them live in nations where posting, sharing or supporting unpopular opinions on social media can get you arrested. This past July, the Cyberspace Administration of China, the administration in charge of online censorship, issued new rules to websites and service providers which enabled the government to punish any outlet that publishes "directly as news reports unverified content found on online platforms such as social media." And the Supreme Court, especially the Roberts Court, has been, on the main, a strong defender of free expression," Danielle Keats Citron, Professor of Law at the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, wrote to Engadget. The popular game managed to reduce toxic language and the abuse of other players by 11 percent and 6.2 percent, respectively, after LoL's developer, RiotGames, instituted an automated notification system that reminded players not to be jerks at various points throughout each match.


U.N. votes for Japan co-drafted resolution slamming North Korea for diverting dire food funds to arms programs

The Japan Times

The U.N.'s new rights expert on North Korea, Argentine Tomas Quintana, is In an unusual move, the General Assembly's human rights committee approved Tuesday's resolution sponsored by Japan and the European Union without a vote despite North Korea's vehement opposition. North Korean Counselor Ri Song Chol told the committee before the vote that his government totally rejects the resolution as "full of lies, fabrications," calling it "an illegal and unlawful document, a plot, which is not worth … consideration." The draft resolution expresses "very serious concern" at continuing reports of North Korean human rights violations including torture, rape, public executions, arbitrary executions, severe restrictions on freedom of religion, expression and peaceful assembly, and the absence of due process and the rule of law. Japan's Bessho said North Korea continues to divert its limited resources to develop weapons of mass destruction in spite of the "dire humanitarian situation" in the country, where a U.N. report said 18 million of the country's 24.9 million people need assistance.


Tay: Microsoft issues apology over racist chatbot fiasco - BBC News

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Microsoft has apologised for creating an artificially intelligent chatbot that quickly turned into a holocaust-denying racist. In China, people reacted differently - a similar chatbot had been rolled out to Chinese users, but with slightly better results. "Tay was not the first artificial intelligence application we released into the online social world," Microsoft's head of research wrote. That said, Mr Lee said a specific vulnerability meant Tay was able to turn nasty.


In Contrast to Tay, Microsoft's Chinese Chatbot, Xiaolce, Is Actually Pleasant

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When you heard about Tay, Microsoft's tweeting A.I., were you really surprised that a computer that learned about human nature from Twitter would become a raging racist in less than a day? Naturally, Microsoft apologized for the horrifying tweets by the chatbot with "zero chill." In that apology, the company stressed that the Chinese version of Tay, Xiaoice or Xiaolce, provides a very positive experience for users in stark contrast to this experiment gone so very wrong. "In China, our Xiaolce chatbot is being used by some 40 million people, delighting with its stories and conversations.