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Don't worry, driverless cars are learning from Grand Theft Auto

#artificialintelligence

In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix. The blockbuster video game is one of the simulation platforms researchers and engineers increasingly rely on to test and train the machines being primed to take control of the family sedan. Companies from Ford Motor Co. to Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo may boast about putting no-hands models on the market in three years, but there's a lot still to learn about drilling algorithms in how to respond when, say, a mattress falls off a truck on the freeway. If automakers and tech enterprises want to make their deadline, they have to hurry up.


Don't Worry, Driverless Cars Are Learning From Grand Theft Auto

#artificialintelligence

In the race to the autonomous revolution, developers have realized there aren't enough hours in a day to clock the real-world miles needed to teach cars how to drive themselves. Which is why Grand Theft Auto V is in the mix. The blockbuster video game is one of the simulation platforms researchers and engineers increasingly rely on to test and train the machines being primed to take control of the family sedan. Companies from Ford Motor Co. to Alphabet Inc.'s Waymo may boast about putting no-hands models on the market in three years, but there's a lot still to learn about drilling algorithms in how to respond when, say, a mattress falls off a truck on the freeway. If automakers and tech enterprises want to make their deadline, they have to hurry up.


Self-Driving Cars Safety: Radar-Based 4D Mapping System Could Make Autonomous Cars Safer

International Business Times

When it comes to self-driving cars, safety remains a prime concern, especially after recent crashes involving such vehicles. Currently, such cars use cameras and sensors for object detection with only Tesla using radars in limited capacity for the same purpose. An Israeli firm, Arbe Robotics, aims to make self-driving safer with its radar-based 4D mapping system called Ultres, which will provide self-driving vehicles with high-resolution imaging with 360-degree obstacle detection up to 300 meters. The company claims that the car would be able to act faster with relation to obstacles than humans in all weather conditions. Ultres is the combination of the company's patented hardware, signal processing and 3D modeling algorithm.


Waymo's self-driving van heads to Tahoe for some time in the snow

#artificialintelligence

Waymo is working on one of the key areas it still needs to tackle ahead of any general public launch of its self-driving technology: snow. The company's vehicles still had a lot to learn in this specific realm as of late last year, and it's one of the most challenging road conditions any autonomous vehicle can face, because of the effects of deep cold and blanketing snow not only on traction and vehicle handling, but also on sensors and optics. Waymo CEO John Krafcik posted a tweet with an image of the Waymo Chrysler Pacifica minivan, kitted out with its in-house self-driving sensor technology, in a snowy setting at South Lake Tahoe in California. The Lake Tahoe location keeps Waymo within the domain of its license to test autonomous systems on state roads, but also provides snowy environs to test more extreme conditions and help it build out its flexibility in terms of weather conditions. Waymo's Pacifica vans began test drives on public roads in both California and Arizona in January.


Waymo's self-driving van heads to Tahoe for some time in the snow

#artificialintelligence

Waymo is working on one of the key areas it still needs to tackle ahead of any general public launch of its self-driving technology: snow. The company's vehicles still had a lot to learn in this specific realm as of late last year, and it's one of the most challenging road conditions any autonomous vehicle can face, because of the effects of deep cold and blanketing snow not only on traction and vehicle handling, but also on sensors and optics. Waymo CEO John Krafcik posted a tweet with an image of the Waymo Chrysler Pacifica minivan, kitted out with its in-house self-driving sensor technology, in a snowy setting at South Lake Tahoe in California. The Lake Tahoe location keeps Waymo within the domain of its license to test autonomous systems on state roads, but also provides snowy environs to test more extreme conditions and help it build out its flexibility in terms of weather conditions. Waymo's Pacifica vans began test drives in January, on public roads in both California and Arizona.


AI is already driving the future of connected cars

#artificialintelligence

In 2017, we are at the dawn of the third great revolution in end-user devices. First came the PC in the 1990s with Windows, and then arrived the smartphone in 2006 with the iPhone. Now, we are on the cusp of the next big shift in end-user experience: the automobile. This shift is shaping up to be more significant than the previous two because it marks a digital path to understanding the physical world. The automotive business will grow and change dramatically over the next 5 to 15 years, with 2017 setting the stage for that growth.


Intel Gives A Glimpse Inside Its Autonomous Driving Lab On Wheels

Forbes

Many of the top players in technology and automobiles are fervently working towards a world in which autonomous driving vehicles are commonplace. Some current vehicles, like the Tesla Model S, already offer self-driving, auto-pilot capabilities, but these are a precursor to fully autonomous vehicles that operate with virtually no human intervention. As you'd probably expect, Intel is actively working in the area as well. Massive amounts of processing power and storage are needed to churn through and store the deep learning models that will disseminate data for autonomous vehicles. Today the company posted a short video that gives a glimpse into its Autonomous Driving Lab in Chandler, Arizona.


Ford wants to keep drivers alert on the long road to autonomous cars

AITopics Original Links

Self-driving vehicles will make the driver redundant, but long before that, smarter cars may leave the driver thinking about other things. Ford is already studying that problem, anticipating an evolution toward autonomous cars that will take a lot longer than projects by the likes of Google may suggest. For now, the motorist is still in charge--with some help. "We still have a driver-centric model. We still think the driver needs to be engaged," said Don Butler, Ford's executive vice president of connected vehicle and services.


Self-driving cars to learn from human drivers to help spot risks

AITopics Original Links

Driverless cars are being taught to drive more like human motorists in an attempt to help them recognise and respond to risks on the road. The technology is being developed in the hope of overcoming some of the problems that are thought to have led to the fatal crash involving a Tesla electric car with its autopilot feature enabled. Scientists and road safety campaigners insist there is still significant development needed before motorists will be able to take their hands entirely off the steering wheel and let robots take over. Driverless cars are to learn from human drivers about how to spot the risks on real city roads (pictured) in a new project. Suppose a driverless car is headed towards five pedestrians - it can stay on course and kill them or swerve into a concrete wall, killing its passenger.


Alibaba says it can 'quickly' adapt cars to become self-driving

AITopics Original Links

Last year, Chinese tech firm Alibaba paired with the country's largest automaker to connect their cars to the internet. Now, in an attempt to keep up with emerging technology, the companies will soon be implementing self-driving features into their vehicles. The car company's CEO Wang Jian told Reuters on Wednesday the new internet technology will allow the joint venture to quickly adapt its cars to become self-driving. Chinese auto maker SAIC Motor Corp Ltd joined forces with e-commerce giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd to invest 1 billion yuan ($160 million/£123 million) in a fund to develop internet-connected cars. Chinese auto maker SAIC Motor joined forces with e-commerce giant Alibaba last year.