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Tesla poaches Apple vet for self-driving job

USATODAY

Panasonic will invest more than $256 million in a New York production facility of Elon Musk's Tesla Motors to make photovoltaic cells and modules, deepening a partnership of the two companies. SAN FRANCISCO -- Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk famously called Apple a "Tesla graveyard" where his failed employees go to toil. That was a nifty bit of Musk-esque verbal sparring in what is a growing talent war between the tech titans. But it seems he's now robbing the graveyard. In a blog post Tuesday, Tesla announced that it was hiring 11-year Apple veteran Chris Lattner, an engineer who was primarily responsible for creating Swift, the programming language for building apps on Apple platforms.


iPhone turns 10: Apple CEO Tim Cook promises 'best is yet to come' for revolutionary smartphone

The Independent

Tim Cook has said that the "best" of the iPhone is still yet to come, as Apple celebrates its 10th birthday. The first phone was introduced on 9 January 2007 at a Macworld event in San Francisco, by Steve Jobs. The late Apple co-founder described the pocket computer as three products in one – "a widescreen iPod with touch controls, a revolutionary mobile phone and a breakthrough internet communications device". Now, 10 years later, the company is celebrating the anniversary by promising that the upcoming phones – presumably including the much-rumoured iPhone 8 – will bring updates better than those seen in the phones since 2007. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Tech trends we're most looking forward to in 2017

#artificialintelligence

As the end of the year looms over the horizon, it's time to take a look forward and mull over the next big thing in technology. Like any year before, 2017 will bring its own problems and solutions, shaping up both the way we use and think about technology. TNW Conference is back for its 12th year. So without further ado, take a dive into the future and check out some of the most exciting tech trends to look forward to in 2017. With forecasts predicting its growth into a $30 billion market as early as 2020, much has been said about the bright future of virtual reality.


Couple sues Apple after FaceTime was 'involved' in car crash killing daughter

The Independent

A bereaved family is suing Apple after the death of their young daughter, who died in a car crash allegedly caused by a driver who was using FaceTime behind the wheel. The family said the tech giant should have implemented software it patented in 2008 which would have prevented the app being used by a driver. Five-year-old Moriah Modisette was travelling in the back of her parent's car near Dallas in 2014 when it was hit at 65 mph by Garrett Willhelm, 22, who was using the Apple app while driving, police said. She later died of her injuries and her parents, James and Bethany Modisette, and sister, Isabella, eight, were also hurt. Officers at the scene found the FaceTime app still running after the crash.


Tech trends we're most looking forward to in 2017

#artificialintelligence

As the end of the year looms over the horizon, it's time to take a look forward and mull over the next big thing in technology. Like any year before, 2017 will bring its own problems and solutions, shaping up both the way we use and think about technology. So without further ado, take a dive into the future and check out some of the most exciting tech trends to look forward to in 2017. With forecasts predicting its growth into a $30 billion market as early as 2020, much has been said about the bright future of virtual reality. Although the technology remained on the verge of mainstream culture throughout most of 2015, things finally started to pick up over the last 12 months – and it seems this time around VR might legitimately reach the masses next year.


These Are The Five Key Battlegrounds For The Big Tech Platforms In 2017

#artificialintelligence

Large platform companies like Amazon, Apple, Google, Samsung, and Microsoft want to provide the operating system for our lives, and they will fight hard in 2017 to establish their foothold in the emerging technologies we will likely come to rely on in the future. Those with the most complete product offerings have an advantage. Since people like to buy products that play well with the other products they already own, a platform company risks losing customers by not having a product in a hot category. These large companies already have an advantage over smaller companies due to their massive R&D budgets and their ability to hire the best people to build the stuff we want now and to anticipate the technology we'll want in the future. And if a hot product is developed by some ambitious startup, these giants can easily swoop in and acquire both the product and the people who created it.


5 Tech Predictions for 2017

TIME

I've been writing a tech predictions column for nearly 30 years now. I study our research and look for trends and information that give me hints of what I believe might be the hot topics, trends or issues that will impact the tech industry in the coming year. It's well known that Silicon Valley was generally not a big supporter of President-elect Donald Trump. However, technology executives are pragmatic, and they know they need to deal with his administration if they want to see their tech agenda advanced over the next four (or eight) years. Trump's recent meeting with leaders like Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla and SpaceX and others allowed these leaders to share with Trump their concerns.


With Self-Driving Cars, We're All Cartographers

Forbes

Mapmaking used to be the domain of a select group of cartographers that would gather, review, and plot out data onto sheets of paper. The chances that you actually knew a cartographer in the past were probably pretty slim--but not anymore. Today and in the future, virtually everyone is or will be a contributor to the increasingly detailed maps that represent the world we live in. As our vehicles become increasingly automated, they need ever more detailed maps and not just the maps we get from Google or Apple on our smartphones. The self-driving car will need much more information.


Apple's Robo-Car Letter Reveals 30-Year Detroit Veteran On Its Stealth Auto Team

Forbes

As carmakers and tech companies race to perfect self-driving vehicles, Apple's program and its automotive intentions remain notably ambiguous. Like Washington's old rule about the National Security Agency, its very existence isn't to be mentioned – at least not by the company. Yet when Apple recently offered views on preliminary guidelines for autonomous vehicles in a letter to U.S. regulators, it let slip an interesting detail: Its "Titan" project team has a high-level Big 3 veteran with more than 30 years of industry expertise. The author of Apple's comments to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is Steve Kenner, identified in the letter as the company's director of product integrity. It confirms that Apple wants the option to test automated vehicles on public roads, though it doesn't mention a specific plan to do so or an intention to commercialize such technology.


Samsung does not have to pay Apple $399 million in patent dispute, Supreme Court rules

The Independent

The US Supreme Court told a lower court to take another look at a $399 million award won by Apple from rival Samsung for copying the design of the iPhone. The unanimous decision extends a legal battle that dates back to 2011 and at one point spanned the globe and engulfed every major maker of smartphones. Writing for the court, Justice Sonia Sotomayor said Apple might not be entitled to Samsung's entire profit on 11 infringing smartphones. She told a federal appeals court to consider whether Apple should be able to recoup profits attributable only to particular components. The high court stopped short of deciding that question itself.